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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
BMW i3? Weak engine and 2.4 gallon tank good luck on a 1,000 mile road trip or hell, even a 300 Mile trip.

RAV4 Prime? SUV, good battery, good ground clearance and .. oh yeah, they basically don't exist and cost $50,000; no thanks!

Tesla, Mach E, Hyundai Kona, Ioniq, whatever else you find.. about 280 miles of effective EV range, 30 minutes to an %80 charge, yeah.. your 12 hour 1,000 mile road trip just got 2+ hours longer.. Which will do if you have to but that really isn't ideal. oh yeah, and these "long range" models still cost like $45,000.

Bolt, leaf, VW ID 4, [insert whatever here], 200 miles effective range>see above ^^^

Fusion hybrid, Malibu hybrid, Prius etc... well you get 50 MPG roughly, that's.. cool. ish.. OR you could get one of the PHEV variants get a whopping 20 miles all electric plus 45 MPG.. which is.. cool.. ish..

Smart Car, older Nissan leafs, Chevy spark, Mitsubishi I, Fiat 500 e, etc.. [Laughs internally]

The Volt is the only car that can handle the upper end of the "average" work commute or all your errands around town while also having the convenience of short stops while on the road.

I'm open to suggestions but yeah.. there's nothing practical out there to drive around town for dirt cheap AND bypass the long charging times for longer trips. At this point, when the Volt dies or perhaps at the end of its warranty, I'll shell out for that 2019 I want or maybe just get a Bolt and rent a car for road trips. Of course renting is super expensive too so maybe not..
 

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If you like to tinker a little... I'd suggest a Honda G1 Insight.

Beautifully engineered. Wonderfully built. Aluminum body. Inexpensive.
70 mpg at highway speeds. Simple enough to wrench on.
You can even replace the aging battery pack with new chemistries.

Plus, a huge and very helpful enthusiast community.
Honda Insight Forum (insightcentral.net)

But... 20 years old. No back seat. Small car.
Drives great, though. Tons of fun. One of the best cars I ever owned.

I always took mine to the local (very good) dealer. Never had a lick of trouble with it.
Sometimes, I wish I still had mine!
 

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It gets even worse in the truck space. Rivian towing anything significant in weight or with poor aerodynamics drops the range to the 100-130 mile range according to recent videos by TFL and Out of Spec. Then you'll take ~2 hours to charge it up again to go another 100 miles. We'll see how Cybertruck does but the laws of physics are not on the side of it towing much better either.

200kWh of Ultimum batteries in the Hummer would have been way better allocated to putting 34kWh in 6 PHEV trucks. Same with Lightning. The fact that the OEMs have left this market untapped (relying on upfitters like Via Motors, XLFleet, etc) is absolutely baffling to me.

Somebody, for the love of all that is good, make an AWD, high ground clearance, holds a full sheet of plywood, and tows ~10k triple strength Volt already!

Until then, yeah it's an electric for every day and rental for special cases world. This doesn't work well for me though, as my closest rental office is ~70 miles away.
 

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The Volt is the only car that can handle the upper end of the "average" work commute or all your errands around town while also having the convenience of short stops while on the road.

I'm open to suggestions but yeah.. there's nothing practical out there to drive around town for dirt cheap AND bypass the long charging times for longer trips. At this point, when the Volt dies or perhaps at the end of its warranty, I'll shell out for that 2019 I want or maybe just get a Bolt and rent a car for road trips. Of course renting is super expensive too so maybe not..
Having both a 2011 Volt and a 2017 Bolt EV, I'll say the Volt is a nice looking sedan, lots of cargo space with the fold-down seats and hatch. The dual fuel is great for very long trips.

On the other hand, the Bolt is our go to car. With it's new 260 mile range (my battery got replaced with the newest one during the recall), the Bolt is great for even long trips. It's a hoot to drive and handles a daily commute of 70 miles with ease. I think of the remaining 190 miles as it's backup "range extender" :) That's plenty for extra trips around the Chicago metro area even in winter. The Bolt also has roof rails, enabling me to add cross bars to haul some sheet goods like 4x8 plywood, etc. The cargo space is taller than the Volt's but a little shorter. I like the Bolt's "space wagon" styling, others don't.
 
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The Volt is the only car that can handle the upper end of the "average" work commute or all your errands around town while also having the convenience of short stops while on the road.
People talk about the Volt handling longer work commutes on pure electric, but do most people consistently do straight commutes without any side trips to the grocery store, gym, daycare, a hike, etc.? I have a mere ~5 mile work commute, but I find I still occasionally use up all of the Volt's electric range on days where I'm doing a few fairly short trips in addition to the commute. The Gen2 Volt's electric range is perfect for me--and of course I have the ICE as a backup on days when it's insufficient--but the electric range would be a lot less of a good fit if I didn't have such a short commute.
 

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The Volt is amazing and was ahead of its time.

The closest car to the Volt that I know of is the BMW 330e. 22 miles on EV only and then the gas engine takes over like the Volt. We went shopping for one, but they are very scarce, only 40 in the whole country.
 

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The closest car to the Volt that I know of is the BMW 330e. 22 miles on EV only and then the gas engine takes over like the Volt. We went shopping for one, but they are very scarce, only 40 in the whole country.
My cousin's husband finally got his very end of last year, after like 11 months of delay from BMW. He likes it, but yeah that shorter range is just silly. Even the Rav4 EV at 42 miles city / 31.6 70mph highway range is like ... really? Ten years after the Volt debut and we're still producing vehicles that can't match its highway AER?
 

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BMW i3? Weak engine and 2.4 gallon tank good luck on a 1,000 mile road trip or hell, even a 300 Mile trip.

RAV4 Prime? SUV, good battery, good ground clearance and .. oh yeah, they basically don't exist and cost $50,000; no thanks!

Tesla, Mach E, Hyundai Kona, Ioniq, whatever else you find.. about 280 miles of effective EV range, 30 minutes to an %80 charge, yeah.. your 12 hour 1,000 mile road trip just got 2+ hours longer.. Which will do if you have to but that really isn't ideal. oh yeah, and these "long range" models still cost like $45,000.

Bolt, leaf, VW ID 4, [insert whatever here], 200 miles effective range>see above ^^^

Fusion hybrid, Malibu hybrid, Prius etc... well you get 50 MPG roughly, that's.. cool. ish.. OR you could get one of the PHEV variants get a whopping 20 miles all electric plus 45 MPG.. which is.. cool.. ish..

Smart Car, older Nissan leafs, Chevy spark, Mitsubishi I, Fiat 500 e, etc.. [Laughs internally]

The Volt is the only car that can handle the upper end of the "average" work commute or all your errands around town while also having the convenience of short stops while on the road.

I'm open to suggestions but yeah.. there's nothing practical out there to drive around town for dirt cheap AND bypass the long charging times for longer trips. At this point, when the Volt dies or perhaps at the end of its warranty, I'll shell out for that 2019 I want or maybe just get a Bolt and rent a car for road trips. Of course renting is super expensive too so maybe not..
Plus it's basically the only PHEV (that I can think of off the top of my head) that drives like an EV regardless if the engine is on or not. Always having that instant power & smooth acceleration is so nice & makes the jerkiness of other cars a lot more noticeable. Whenever my Gen1 dies (hopefully not for years) I struggle to figure out what I'll replace it with, Gen2 seems to have a lot more issues so unless I'm able to go full EV by the time I need another car nothing really compares to the Volt, I absolutely love it even with the few minor issues I've had.
 

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People talk about the Volt handling longer work commutes on pure electric, but do most people consistently do straight commutes without any side trips to the grocery store, gym, daycare, a hike, etc.? I have a mere ~5 mile work commute, but I find I still occasionally use up all of the Volt's electric range on days where I'm doing a few fairly short trips in addition to the commute. The Gen2 Volt's electric range is perfect for me--and of course I have the ICE as a backup on days when it's insufficient--but the electric range would be a lot less of a good fit if I didn't have such a short commute.
I work 12 hour shifts at a mine, 29 miles from my house. We have free level 2 charging at work, which is excellent. I don't deviate on my commute unless absolutely necessary, and if needed I drive right past a couple of hardware stores and grocery stores.

The only time I burn gas is visiting family in another town or in the winter (stupid Canadian winters ;) ).
 

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I agree. I've been looking for a PHEV and so far the clear stand-out is the Chevrolet Volt. I've noticed that car reviews for similar cars (see my list below) compare to the Volt and usually the Volt is the better option.

In my opinion, the Volt is the perfect car for someone (like me) that isn't ready to plunge into pure EV but wants a partial solution.

Some of the similar vehicles that I've also looked at are:
2019-2022 Hyundai IONIQ Plug-In Hybrid (nice car but don't like the looks compared to Volt)
2016-2018 Audi A3 e-tron (nice car but only 16 ev miles and not a fan of the looks)
2018-2021 Honda Clarity Plug-In Hybrid (don't care for the looks but did get decent reviews)
2001-2022 Toyota Prius (nah, not for me)
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Hmm. loo
I work 12 hour shifts at a mine, 29 miles from my house. We have free level 2 charging at work, which is excellent. I don't deviate on my commute unless absolutely necessary, and if needed I drive right past a couple of hardware stores and grocery stores.

The only time I burn gas is visiting family in another town or in the winter (stupid Canadian winters ;) ).
I was going to say, I might be the oddball but I work 12 hours shifts 2/3 days on and 2/3 days off with a 30 mi commute mix of back roads highway and interstate so my commute usually comes to 35 or 40 minutes. My 2014 gen 1 volt has just enough range to make the commute with a little extra to spare. In the winter I let it ERDTT which again lets me finish the commute with about .2 gallons gas used and a little energy to spare. With work shifts like that there really isn't time to make a detour unless it's along the route already. And if I'm not going to work then it easily handles going to town which is about a 15-minute One Way drive country roads.

I've been relying on level one charging since it's cheaper than installing level 2 and frankly it's been adequate unless I end up driving to town multiple times throughout the day.
 
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Hmm. loo


I was going to say, I might be the oddball but I work 12 hours shifts 2/3 days on and 2/3 days off with a 30 mi commute mix of back roads highway and interstate so my commute usually comes to 35 or 40 minutes. My 2014 gen 1 volt has just enough range to make the commute with a little extra to spare. In the winter I let it ERDTT which again lets me finish the commute with about .2 gallons gas used and a little energy to spare. With work shifts like that there really isn't time to make a detour unless it's along the route already. And if I'm not going to work then it easily handles going to town which is about a 15-minute One Way drive country roads.

I've been relying on level one charging since it's cheaper than installing level 2 and frankly it's been adequate unless I end up driving to town multiple times throughout the day.
Another similarity, then, lol. Our detached single garage was wired with one 15 Amp breaker to run everything (door, lights, outlets). It'd be expensive to trench another line so it's Level 1 at home for me!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I agree. I've been looking for a PHEV and so far the clear stand-out is the Chevrolet Volt. I've noticed that car reviews for similar cars (see my list below) compare to the Volt and usually the Volt is the better option.

In my opinion, the Volt is the perfect car for someone (like me) that isn't ready to plunge into pure EV but wants a partial solution.

Some of the similar vehicles that I've also looked at are:
2019-2022 Hyundai IONIQ Plug-In Hybrid (nice car but don't like the looks compared to Volt)
2016-2018 Audi A3 e-tron (nice car but only 16 ev miles and not a fan of the looks)
2018-2021 Honda Clarity Plug-In Hybrid (don't care for the looks but did get decent reviews)
2001-2022 Toyota Prius (nah, not for me)
Thanks, the ionic seems to do better than most with up to 29 all electric miles but even that sadly doesn't compare to the Volt or what I need.

There is one hopeful though. The Clarity looks comparable with up to 48 miles of electric range. It sadly isn't a hatchback but apparently you can get it with adaptive cruise control? And apparently the gas engine can still kick on if you accelerate heavy but... That'll be one to actually keep an eye on when the time comes. See a lot of people hating on the style but I think its kind of cool reminds me of the EV-1 and for some reason I just like that.
 
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Thanks, the ionic seems to do better than most with up to 29 all electric miles but even that sadly doesn't compare to the Volt or what I need.

There is one hopeful though. The Clarity looks comparable with up to 48 miles of electric range. It sadly isn't a hatchback but apparently you can get it with adaptive cruise control? And apparently the gas engine can still kick on if you accelerate heavy but... That'll be one to actually keep an eye on when the time comes. See a lot of people hating on the style but I think its kind of cool reminds me of the EV-1 and for some reason I just like that.
Honda discontinued the Clarity hydrogen fuel cell and plug-in hybrid models in August 2021.

In addition to both the Clarity Plug-in Hybrid and Clarity Fuel Cell, Nikkei also reported that Honda would stop making the Legend, its high-end ICE sedan, as well as the Odyssey luxury SUV – all of which were made at the same factory in Sayama, Japan, which the company announced will close by March 2022[/QUOTE
 

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Volt works for me. I haven't taken any road trips because of COVID. In-laws had a family get together in Calgary, first one in two years, out side in gazebo (no masks). What could go wrong? Out of 18 people, 16 came away with COVID, including one that was fighting cancer with chemo, twice in the hospital but looks ;like he is going to make it through COVID. No road trips for foreseeable future. I live in the country, go past a couple of dairy farms and an egg farm and I only use about half a battery per trip into town and back. Only use engine when I leave the valley (about once a month at most) so the Gen I Volt works great for me.

When I converted my carport to a garage, my brother-in-law carpenter helping me said "do you want a subpanel down here". No I said just run a line down for heater and workbench outlet. Couple years later I picked up a half priced 80 gallon 240V air compressor from a bankruptcy sale. No placed to plug it in for years. When I started my 7 year house renovations in 2010, I ran a 60 amp line down to subpanel in garage, so I could run the air compressor (and a 30amp line to old wall oven for curing ceramic paints, a 110V line for 20 amps, a line back in house for freezer, one for electric fireplace, another for fan exhaust and electronics in fireplace upstairs. Years later when I got the Volt I use the air compressor line (240V 20A) to charge the Volt, only having to spend $30 to match the outlet to the EVSE plug. 2.5 hours charging per trip into town. And the oven circuit if I need it if I ever get an EV. It all worked out in the end.
 
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I agree. I've been looking for a PHEV and so far the clear stand-out is the Chevrolet Volt. I've noticed that car reviews for similar cars (see my list below) compare to the Volt and usually the Volt is the better option.

In my opinion, the Volt is the perfect car for someone (like me) that isn't ready to plunge into pure EV but wants a partial solution.

Some of the similar vehicles that I've also looked at are:
2019-2022 Hyundai IONIQ Plug-In Hybrid (nice car but don't like the looks compared to Volt)
2016-2018 Audi A3 e-tron (nice car but only 16 ev miles and not a fan of the looks)
2018-2021 Honda Clarity Plug-In Hybrid (don't care for the looks but did get decent reviews)
2001-2022 Toyota Prius (nah, not for me)
I always liked the Ioniq lineup & I like that it has the split-window design like the 1st gen Volt, I just can't get over getting downgraded range from a car that's a decade newer, plus the weaker electric motor means the gas engine will come on under heavier acceleration, the engine is required to run to produce heat in the winter, I assume the dual clutch is probably still very noticeable even though the electric motor would smooth out the starting a bit, and I wonder how the engine would fare after several years since Hyundai's GDI motors have carbon buildup issues.. one would think a vehicle that has the engine constantly turning on/off or barely running & for only short periods of time would not be the greatest candidate for that type of engine but hopefully I'm wrong & they know more than I do lol. If Hyundai increased the range and maybe made some performance increases with the electric motor it would be super enticing in my opinion.
 

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If you like to tinker a little... I'd suggest a Honda G1 Insight.

Beautifully engineered. Wonderfully built. Aluminum body. Inexpensive.
70 mpg at highway speeds. Simple enough to wrench on.
You can even replace the aging battery pack with new chemistries.

Plus, a huge and very helpful enthusiast community.
Honda Insight Forum (insightcentral.net)

But... 20 years old. No back seat. Small car.
Drives great, though. Tons of fun. One of the best cars I ever owned.

I always took mine to the local (very good) dealer. Never had a lick of trouble with it.
Sometimes, I wish I still had mine!
If you like to tinker a little... I'd suggest a Honda G1 Insight.

Beautifully engineered. Wonderfully built. Aluminum body. Inexpensive.
70 mpg at highway speeds. Simple enough to wrench on.
You can even replace the aging battery pack with new chemistries.

Plus, a huge and very helpful enthusiast community.
Honda Insight Forum (insightcentral.net)

But... 20 years old. No back seat. Small car.
Drives great, though. Tons of fun. One of the best cars I ever owned.

I always took mine to the local (very good) dealer. Never had a lick of trouble with it.
Sometimes, I wish I still had mine!
Too F..ing slow. I'd get rear ended. Remember, Volt has a 100 mph top speed, and 0 to 30 is similar to a Tesla Model S.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Honda discontinued the Clarity hydrogen fuel cell and plug-in hybrid models in August 2021.
Brilliant, truly.. So we're just going to have to hold out as long as we can. If my gen 1 was paid for I would just bite the bullet and buy a refurbished battery when needed and enjoy the car another 5 years or so, but given I still owe on it its tempting to sell it when I can still make a profit rather than face a loss when it dies or pump thousands on top to keep her going.
 

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Brilliant, truly.. So we're just going to have to hold out as long as we can. If my gen 1 was paid for I would just bite the bullet and buy a refurbished battery when needed and enjoy the car another 5 years or so, but given I still owe on it its tempting to sell it when I can still make a profit rather than face a loss when it dies or pump thousands on top to keep her going.
Yes, the Gen 1 Volt was and still is a marvel of engineering. It's a EV and a backup generator. The Gen 2 Volts lean a little more on the gas engine in a few cases, but still is head and shoulders above PHEV's out there. It has a nice balance of looks, performance and price. Why other's have not been able to offer the same or better a decade later is a mystery.

Yes, when my 2011 battery goes, I'll very likely get it repaired/replaced to take me into the 2024-2025 zone.
 
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