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Worlds largest EV may produce more energy than it consumes. It’s a huge dump truck that goes up a steep hill to be loaded and then produces more energy during regeneration on the descent than it uses to climb the hill when empty. The plan is to discharge the batteries to the grid rather than charge from the grid. Moving the minerals from the quarry to a refining site is a plus also.

https://phys.org/news/2017-09-e-dumper-world-largest-electric-vehicle.html
 

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Most probably already know that typical diesel-electric locomotives use regen for braking going down grades. Without any storage medium, however, they just dump the generated energy through resistance coils in the big radiators on top of the engines.
 

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Ore haulers are all electric vehicles.

It is expected to transport material down from a mountain ridge and into the valley.....The empty truck then uses this energy to travel back up the hill. If all goes as planned, the electric dumper truck will even harvest more electricity while traveling downhill than it needs for the ascent.
That's fine if the load is hauled downhill. In many quarries the challenge is getting the load up and out of the quarry. In that case the already electric drive will still need the diesel powered generator to run the motors.

The electric drive carries key advantages for these journeys: instead of heating up the brakes during the descent, the gigantic electric engine acts like a generator recharging the battery pack.
This is not a breakthrough. Depending on the incline many haulers operate without using the hydraulic brakes already. Storing the regen energy in a battery is unusual in this type of vehicle though.

As these vehicles are already very heavy, I wonder about adding so much battery weight.

If all goes as planned..............If the use of the new vehicle proves successful
It's unproven. It might be better to write the story after it's in use and productive. We get so many maybe stories it's getting hard to believe anything these days.

He is primarily interested in how the cells respond if an accident occurs. What happens if a cell is damaged mechanically? If a switch malfunctions and the battery does not disconnect from the electricity once charged? "Some batteries start smoking, others burst into flames," as Held is all too aware. "The crucial thing in this instance is to make sure the neighboring cells are not damaged by the fire and heat, otherwise there is the risk of a chain reaction." Held will conduct overcharging tests at Empa's test rig and also mistreat a few cells with a steel nail.
Keep your fingers crossed!
 

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Mining is looking beyonds trucks...

Truckless Technology
Some mining companies are choosing to replace trucks with more environmentally friendly conveyor belt systems. The Brazilian mining company Vale recently replaced its in-mine trucks with 23 miles of conveyor belts at its iron ore mine, connecting the ore deposits to the company’s processing plant.



According to Vale project director Jamil Sebe, the conveyor belts are expected to reduce fuel consumption by an estimated 77%, while decreasing emissions by the equivalent of 75,000 small cars. (See related article, “Trucks or Conveyor Systems: Which Is Better?“)
https://www.mcshanemetalproducts.com/blog-post/trucks-conveyor-systems-which-is-better/


I like the Fun Fact about the over 60 mile long conveyor visible from space...

Underground mining operations are also increasingly opting for mine rail cars for material hauling. Because of the uneven surfaces of underground passageways, maintaining the trucks and other equipment required to carry heavy loads can be very costly and time-consuming. Although tracked haulage systems typically require a substantial initial investment, they are often much less costly to operate, as mine rail cars are not likely to be affected by rugged terrain.

In addition, some materials, such as coal, are much more energy-efficient to haul by rail than by truck.

Simon Walker, European editor for Engineering & Mining Journal, recently endorsed railway haulage, “With mines getting deeper, investment financing harder to come by, and energy prices rising, operators need to choose an underground haulage system that will help them cut costs and reduce their environmental footprint…. Although expensive to install, rail networks are relatively cheap to maintain….”
 
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