GM Volt Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
121 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Got "new" level 2 charger, went to move old one around to install it and found this! Used a 12 gauge extension cord, but must have been warm enough to melt the rubber around the prongs. Never noticed a large amount of heat any time I checked it. Waiting on electrician to hook new one to panel, so I replaced plug end so I could still use it until then. (Without the extension cord)
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
1,027 Posts
That's usually caused by a poor connection, from the connectors in the receptacle wearing out and not making good enough contact.

resistance = heat

At least it sacrificially melted and didn't burn anything up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,784 Posts
Ummm,
That's not a L2 / 240V connector.
That's a typical L1 / 120V connector.

Are dikin around with a 240V to 120V Adaptomatic, Ho Made Special?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
385 Posts
Yep, I agree with Aseras. A 12 ga wire is fine for the current draw. It was almost certainly a poor outlet connection that started arcing due to being either loose or dirty.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,405 Posts
No, you do not replace a 12ga circuit with a 12ga extension cord.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
121 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
No that's the 120v OEM charger plug. 240v is new Clipper Creek I have yet to hook up.
Ummm,
That's not a L2 / 240V connector.
That's a typical L1 / 120V connector.

Are dikin around with a 240V to 120V Adaptomatic, Ho Made Special?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
260 Posts
No that's the 120v OEM charger plug. 240v is new Clipper Creek I have yet to hook up.
In that photo, is the black piece on the left the end of your extension cord? Was it plugged into a 120v or a 240v outlet (adapter)?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,339 Posts
Yikes, that's a bummer, and is probably one of the reasons why the owner's manual says to not use extension cords. But I use one too... I think as long as you use 12ga or better, short as possible, with quality connectors, then it's fine. The problem is that most cords have crappy crimped connectors that seem to fail over time with the duty cycle an EV demands. I ended up making a custom 8' 12ga cord from Home Depot power cord, and used quality screw terminal connectors. Going strong 3 years later! YMMV.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
260 Posts
Yikes, that's a bummer, and is probably one of the reasons why the owner's manual says to not use extension cords. But I use one too... I think as long as you use 12ga or better, short as possible, with quality connectors, then it's fine. The problem is that most cords have crappy crimped connectors that seem to fail over time with the duty cycle an EV demands. I ended up making a custom 8' 12ga cord from Home Depot power cord, and used quality screw terminal connectors. Going strong 3 years later! YMMV.
Do you think something like this would work okay? It's a 10-gauge 10-foot heavy duty cord at Home Depot, but maximum amps are only 15, while max volts is 300.

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Panamax-10-ft-10-1-AC-Heavy-Duty-Extension-Cord-GEC-1410/203821304


There is this 25ft 10-gauge generator cord that says it can do 30 amps and 250 volts, too:

http://www.homedepot.com/p/RIDGID-25-ft-10-4-Generator-Cord-615-18046AB/100665722
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
121 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Yes, it was the end of a (I thought) good quality heavy gauge extension cord plugged into a 120v 15A dedicated circuit. Rubber seemed to melt and lock the prongs in the plug. Pulled and tugged and that's what I got. I never felt any heat except at plug end and even that wasn't hot just warm. Guess it was just poor connection inside plug.
In that photo, is the black piece on the left the end of your extension cord? Was it plugged into a 120v or a 240v outlet (adapter)?
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top