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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone with a car that needs a replacement part now needs to worry whether the parts will be available. Some parts are seeing a wait time of 1-4 or more months. Naturally, the frustration and cost at being without a car for an extended period can turn to anger at the dealer or the car manufacturer or government being blamed.

This video gives some insight into some of the causes, though I'm sure there are also other complexities involved as well:

 

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The best thing parts wise is to have a common vehicle. There's no issue getting parts for your F150. The past few years are also a reminder that we need to have robust manufacturing here, and the dangers of being too reliant on other nations, especially those that are unfriendly.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The best thing parts wise is to have a common vehicle. There's no issue getting parts for your F150.
I have said the same in other threads. The Volt is a low volume, discontinued car. Parts can be an issue even without the current supply chain problem. And the parts that break most widely will be the ones that run out the fastest. Scrounging ebay and auto salvage yards is the next step.

The past few years are also a reminder that we need to have robust manufacturing here, and the dangers of being too reliant on other nations, especially those that are unfriendly.
Yes. However, if there are only a few domestic producers and one of them goes down it can create big problems. Exhibit A: Abbott Labs baby formula. Close one plant, issue a recall and all hell breaks lose. Best to have some safety net sources overseas as well.
 
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I'm thinking 7 years is how long MFGs are "required" to have parts available for things sold in USA, so any Volt older than 2015 may be in trouble.
 

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I'm thinking 7 years is how long MFGs are "required" to have parts available for things sold in USA, so any Volt older than 2015 may be in trouble.
Nope. No such requirement. It's an internet myth. The ONLY requirement is to honor the fix or buy warranty. So they keep what they think will be enough parts to honor warranty repairs. If they run out, they can buy the car back at some price (not the purchase price of course...).
 

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waited 9 months for a old 350 cam shaft, the new norm
I waited 3 months for custom core bbc double swap cams.5 came in and I snagged 2 for my boat.got lucky that day,,they had just come in,,all 5 of them.:p
waited over a week for a rear caliper for my cadi.
 

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I'm thinking 7 years is how long MFGs are "required" to have parts available for things sold in USA, so any Volt older than 2015 may be in trouble.
The time period is 10 years, but not for parts. This is the time window the NHTSA requires auto manufacturers support recalls. Unfortunately this is only the window for issuing the recall as the Takata airbag recall is still dragging on for some lower volume models.
 
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Needed a new front bumper for my ELR. Body shop told me the conversation went like this:

"So, I called the GM parts department to order the bumper. After the guy at GM stopped laughing, he told me the part was backordered indefinitely and it could be months until we are able to get it."
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Needed a new front bumper for my ELR. Body shop told me the conversation went like this:

"So, I called the GM parts department to order the bumper. After the guy at GM stopped laughing, he told me the part was backordered indefinitely and it could be months until we are able to get it."
ELR is a rare (but beautiful) car. Auto-salvage yard?
 

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Needed a new front bumper for my ELR. Body shop told me the conversation went like this:

"So, I called the GM parts department to order the bumper. After the guy at GM stopped laughing, he told me the part was backordered indefinitely and it could be months until we are able to get it."
depending on the damage,,the bumper can be fixed.my friend who owns an autobody shop was able to plastic weld a crack in mine.been fine for 3 yrs now.some a-hole hit my car when I was at the supermarket.
 

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depending on the damage,,the bumper can be fixed.my friend who owns an autobody shop was able to plastic weld a crack in mine.been fine for 3 yrs now.some a-hole hit my car when I was at the supermarket.
Or wear your Mad Max battle scar proudly :)

 

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depending on the damage,,the bumper can be fixed.my friend who owns an autobody shop was able to plastic weld a crack in mine.been fine for 3 yrs now.some a-hole hit my car when I was at the supermarket.
Or wear your Mad Max battle scar proudly
It truly is a beautiful car but for a life lesson, never give a rare car to your teen son to drive as his first car but I digress...

FWIW, the body shop did just get the bumper in (took about a month) and it's being painted so hopefully it will be replaced soon. Right now, zip ties are holding things together and it actually doesn't look too bad :)
 
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It truly is a beautiful car but for a life lesson, never give a rare car to your teen son to drive as his first car but I digress...
My kids had a 15-year-old, plastic, maroon Saturn SL that they named "Pete."
Pete was the perfect car for the kids...

1. Just fast enough to keep up with traffic.
2. Just warm enough to keep them from freezing.
3. Just cool enough to keep them from broiling.
4. Just dependable enough to get from here to there.
5. Just good enough mpg to not bust the bank.

I paid hardly anything for it. Put hardly anything into it. Sold it for hardly anything.

Looking back, I should've kept it.
By now, it'd be a hit at cars-and-coffees.
 

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I've been debating whether, or not, I should sell my 2013 Volt. Bought it used at the end of 2016, and it did have some frame damage, but it hasn't caused me any problems. And it has served me well for about 5 1/2 years. Mostly paid for itself on gas savings going to work and back for about 5 years. Now I'm retired. The Volt mileage per charge is at 31 miles per charge now.
Because of gas prices in SoCal, I can get almost what I paid for it if I clean it up and fix a few things - net amount might be close to $10,000 after the cost of fixing things, and selling at what they seem to be going for now.
And that would cover the cost of gas even at $8 in my Ridgeline for the next 4 or 5 years.
But then what happens if I need a fix on the Ridgeline, and the parts aren't available for several months?
Or if the battery on the Volt goes out if I keep it, and then it's almost worthless?
Oh my...
So many unknowns to deal with...
And the parts unavailable just adds another one to have to deal with.
I think that problem is leaning me back in the direction of keeping both.
That's while I'll never buy a house with one bathroom - I want a backup option while I fix the one that has the problem at times.
 

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My 2013 Volt is waiting for a back-ordered transaxel (don't ask why I need a new one :( ). The service manager tells me that "back-ordered" to him means a 2 week wait for the part. It sounds like maybe he is just blowing smoke. :(
 

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My kids had a 15-year-old, plastic, maroon Saturn SL that they named "Pete."
Pete was the perfect car for the kids...

1. Just fast enough to keep up with traffic.
2. Just warm enough to keep them from freezing.
3. Just cool enough to keep them from broiling.
4. Just dependable enough to get from here to there.
5. Just good enough mpg to not bust the bank.

I paid hardly anything for it. Put hardly anything into it. Sold it for hardly anything.

Looking back, I should've kept it.
By now, it'd be a hit at cars-and-coffees.
The SL was probably the best made GM car of that era. The plastic/paint bond was incredibly good, so I still see an occasional one that looks almost factory original (other parts aside). The powertrain (although a bit oil leaky) was durable and didn't have too many issues with forged or cast parts failing. I think the part of those vehicles that fail first are the interior fabrics. Of course, it was a squeak box because of (too cheap) fastener selection for isolation between the plastic body panels and the metal space frame they were mounted to which degraded with each passing summer/winter expansion/contraction cycle.

And the electronics of the era were better built than the crap they put in today's cars. In those days they didn't have to manage the heat on the boards as carefully as they weren't trying to cram as many transistors in a small space as they do now.

There is NO modern car that is safe from the failed electronic board today as it costs way too much to make small batch electronics necessary to replace the underestimated stock OEMS keep on hand.
 

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I think I’ll buy a 1956 Jeep, next. No electronics. At all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I think I’ll buy a 1956 Jeep, next. No electronics. At all.
Good in case of an EMP attack... Of course almost all the rest of modern life will be toast, but the Jeep may still run.
 
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