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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Since there is a few Level 2 chargers out there now, I am wondering which one to get.

what charger you have and what you like or don't like about it?
 

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Since there is a few Level 2 chargers out there now, I am wondering which one to get.

what charger you have and what you like or don't like about it?
It is a personal choice. If you like to build things then OpenEVSE is the Heathkit of the EVSE world. Many have high praise for ClipperCreek and their LCS series and HCS series of EVSE. Well designed EVSE with none of the frills (no WiFi, no display panel only status lights.) 3 year warranty and a strong customer service department. Other brands include Chargepoint, Siemens and Juicebox. Some choose to save some $ and purchase a Level 2 EVSE from an off-shore supplier. You can find these for sale on ~zon and ~bay. They may not last as long as an EVSE from a first line brand but then again the off-shore EVSEs generally cost half as much as the name brand EVSEs (i.e., ClipperCreek LCS-20) for an equivalent power rating, capable of charging an EV/PHEV at 230V and up to 16 amps.

Your Volt only needs a 20 amp rated EVSE (the Gen 2 Volt draws a maximum of 16 amps when charging.) The ClipperCreek LCS-20 series is perfectly sized for charging any Chevrolet Volt at 230V. Any larger capacity EVSE such as a 30, 40 or 50 amp rated EVSE will work just fine too but the Volt won't draw any more power than 3.6kW and the extra power rating of a 30 amp or higher EVSE will only be used if you someday own an EV or PHEV that can charge at the higher power level. Rumor is that the 2019 Volt may come with a 7.2kW on-board charger (like the Chevy Bolt does today), we will know in a few months. A 7.2kW on-board charger can draw up to 30-32 amps and requires a minimum of a 40 amp rated EVSE such as ClipperCreek HCS-40 to charge the vehicle at 7.2kW. A 7.2kW on-board charger can also charge at lower power levels too if the EVSE is, for example, limited to 16 amps (3.6kW.)

I purchased a ClipperCreek LCS-20P with a NEMA 14-50 power plug. I have been using my CC LCS-20 since October 2016 with no issues. I like that the LCS series is compact, plugs into a 230V 14-50 receptacle. I can easily upgrade in the future to a higher power rated EVSE but right now the LCS-20 provides all of the power my Volt can use. The ClipperCreek EVSE are well engineered, closely follow the EVSE specifications. When my LCS started displaying a red LED light indicating a Power Fault condition this was traced to when I was using my plug-in leaf blower. I contacted ClipperCreek's Customer Service department and I was able to speak with a ClipperCreek engineer who explained that certain home appliances can generate enough noise on the ground wire connection that the ClipperCreek EVSE may trigger a fault. The EVSE will reset after ~ 20 minutes with no harm done. An EVSE designed to looser tolerances might not detect the excess noise but the ClipperCreek EVSE correctly detects the fault. I never use my leaf blower while charging so it is not an issue. My next leaf blower will be powered by a battery. I believe that my ClipperCreek LCS-20 will last as long as I plan to own my Volt, probably much longer.
 

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I bought this one and very happy with it so far:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07BM1XT4Q/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o03_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

it can be plugged to Level 1 or 2, 120V or 240V auto-sensing without flipping any switch or any change in settings or any problem at all.
the cables are really heavy duty just like that in the charging stations, unlike the flimsy one that came with the Volt.
Delivers the maximum power that the Volt can take at 240V, the OEM EVSE delivers only 2.88 kW, this one for sure at 3.88kW is easy.
It comes with plugs NEMA 6-20 plug at 240V and 110v NEMA14-50 adapter for 120/240 outlets. You know sometimes, in charging stations, there's an outlet below the typical J1772 plug and often they're 120/240V outlets and having the NEMA 6-20 is cool, as most likely no one plugs into them.

And the price with free shipping (prime member) is very reasonable, $199.
 

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Also consider this AmazingE:

https://amazing-e.com/


It is essentially a cheaper clipper Creek unit, made in USA with a three-year warranty, just with the smaller Volt OEM style portable housing (that one is also made by clipper Creek). Be advised it does only come with a 20 foot cord though, that’s the only significant drawback I see with it.

I own two of the dousida units that I got from China directly for $350 (for both) shipped. That is the same as the other unit from Amazon posted above. One has lasted for 18 months without issue the other had to be replaced for free after about nine months of service and the replacement has been fine. However I always prefer to buy US-made components if possible and the amazingE was not available when I bought the Duosidas.



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I think you get what you pay for. Buying the cheapest one you can find might be aggravating with repair issues. Clipper Creek is the de-facto favorite on this site for quality and reliability at a decent (but not the lowest) price. I wish I did my homework as I paid far too much for my Bosch SPX. One thing to consider is paying a little more for a higher amperage EVSE, not that the Volt can use the full capacity, but the next EV might.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I like the OpenEVSE equipment. They are very good value for money, top quality components, provide many features not available in other EVSE's and the price is very reasonable. You can also buy the kit version, put it together yourself and save a couple of hundred....

https://www.openevse.com/
I will have to check this out! I love building things.
 

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Since there is a few Level 2 chargers out there now, I am wondering which one to get.

what charger you have and what you like or don't like about it?
Great deal here with quality parts. My son has been using it a while now on his Volt.

Limited markup EV Car Charger Level 2 - 32A & 16A $249 : http://gm-volt.com/forum/showthread.php?300265-Limited-markup-EV-Car-Charger-Level-2-32A-amp-16A-249

EV Level 2 Car Charging Station 32A, 240VAC, 7.7Kw
J1772 plug with 25-foot Cable to car
Great for Electric vehicles and Plug-in Hybrids alike
Includes 4-foot Power Cable & NEMA 14-50 Plug
Can be easily hard-wired
Charges 6 times faster than basic car chargers! [Note I don't know what this is based on unless it is some cars shipped L1 120v chargers at lower amps like 8 or whatever]
Best car charging station for the lowest price in its class!
It works with all electric and hybrid vehicles on the road today. Uses universal J1772 plug.

This EVSE charge station comes with:
A 32-amp 25-foot vehicle cable with J1772 Plug
6" x 6" x 4" NEMA enclosure for weather-proof and water-resistant usage
Includes 4 heavy duty mounting tabs
Use for Hard-wire mount or use power cable with NEMA plug

Product Description
The EV POWER PLUG product is ready to work with all EVs on the road today.
For the smart buyer this is a great deal!!!!
Internal configuration Options allows Max Amps to be set to 12, 16, 20, 24, 28, or 32 Amps!
If your car uses a J1772 plug then this is the charge station you need!
The EV POWER PLUG station is just 6" x 6" x 4" and weighs about 15lbs with cable/plug.
NEMA Indoor and Outdoor rated
Ready to ship!
3-YEAR WARRANTY parts and labor for any product defects. Warranty does not cover uninstall/reinstall expenses.
 

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I've been using a modified Tesla UMC (mobile connector) called a JESLA for the past 2.5 years. It was modified by snipping off the Tesla-specific plug, and replacing it with a J-1772. The neat thing about the UMC is that it has a variety of adapters for a plethora of 120 and 240v receptacles. Each adapter has a specific resistor built in to it to identify the maximum current of that particular plug type. It normally comes with 5-15 and 14-50 adapters. Other adapters (e.g., 5-20, 6-15, 6-30, 6-50, 10-30, and 14-30) are available at extra cost.

I normally have mine plugged into a 14-50 receptacle 24/7. But if I want to road trip with it, just unplug and take it along.

A version 2 of the UMC was released about the same time as the Model 3. It also has adapters for various receptacles. They are more 'dongle-like' than the one-piece adapters of the original UMC. If I were to do it again, I'd not bother with the J-1772 modification and just get a Tesla to J-1772 adapter cable that a couple of vendors sell. Same goes for the Tesla Wall Charger - which is normally hard-wired.

Actually, truth be told, just using the stock Gen 2 Volt charging cord with a home made 240v adapter cable would be fine for us. It is also the least expensive solution. But I bought the JESLA a few weeks before Chris made his discovery public on the Gen 2s hidden capability. At least I bought the JESLA used on eBay, so didn't pay full freight for it. (And it also included a full set of adapters - including some that were no longer available.)
 

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My used Volt came with this new one still in card board box (bought car from Honda dealership). They got it from local RV dealership. Seems well constructed physically. Don't know about longevity, only had it a month. Came with a 20 amp twist lock so had to put corresponding outlet in my air compressor outlet box. Sharsies. Also put a 20 amp rocker switch in so I can turn it off when not using it to protect it in case of wind storm knocking down a tree (lots of trees here).

https://www.quickchargepower.com/featured-products
 

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1. Clipper Creek is highly regarded as a no frills bomb proof manufacturer.

2. Charge Point offers their "home" version which integrates smart monitoring, usage tracking, and reporting. When I move into a house I'll probably get this one.

3. I have the TurboCord, which is the smallest L1 & L2 unit combined, and is great to use when you'll carry it in the car daily.

4. I would avoid ANY which aren't UL listed, including Open Evse. If it burns down your house you may have claim issues. Cheaper doesn't equal better.
 

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Also consider this AmazingE:

https://amazing-e.com/


It is essentially a cheaper clipper Creek unit, made in USA with a three-year warranty, just with the smaller Volt OEM style portable housing (that one is also made by clipper Creek). Be advised it does only come with a 20 foot cord though, that’s the only significant drawback I see with it.

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I wonder if this is actually Clipper Creek's portable EVSE charger. The Gen 2 Volt's OEM EVSE is Clipper Creek but the Clipper Creek web-site doesn't list any portable EVSE equipment.
 

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I wonder if this is actually Clipper Creek's portable EVSE charger. The Gen 2 Volt's OEM EVSE is Clipper Creek but the Clipper Creek web-site doesn't list any portable EVSE equipment.
I think it is. It appears to have same housing as the GM oem version made by them and has a Clipper Creek warranty. For some reason they don’t want to use the Clipper Creek name....


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I got a used Clipper Creek LCS-20 from another forum member, and I love it. It is VERY well-built and I'm confident it will outlive the car. It's a hardwired version so I can take it with me when I move and wire on whatever plug I need. It will provide 4.8 KW, so even though it's more than my Volt can take, if anyone else in the house gets a BEV like a Bolt, they should have no issue. I plan on actually relocating it to the exterior of the garage since it is durable enough for it, and it will provide more flexibility for where I can park.

I do regret not having WiFi though, and I discovered the OpenEVSE after my purchase. I'm pretty tech savvy, and for the WiFi advantage I sometimes regret not getting that instead. I cannot speak for its durability, though.
 

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I have a Siemens Versicharge. I spent more for the outdoor rated version, even though I have it indoors, because it has a longer charge cord (20ft vs. 14ft). I located my charger near the back of the car by the entrance to the garage. It allows me to either park in the garage or outside the garage and still plug in. It's worth looking at the charge cable length and where you plan to put your charger. I recommend around 20'. Much longer than that and it becomes too much cord to deal with (though if you have good cable management you can usually wrap up the extra), but shorter than that and it doesn't allow much flexibility in where you can park and charge.
 

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I got a used Clipper Creek LCS-20 from another forum member, and I love it. It is VERY well-built and I'm confident it will outlive the car. It's a hardwired version so I can take it with me when I move and wire on whatever plug I need. It will provide 4.8 KW, so even though it's more than my Volt can take, if anyone else in the house gets a BEV like a Bolt, they should have no issue. I plan on actually relocating it to the exterior of the garage since it is durable enough for it, and it will provide more flexibility for where I can park.

I do regret not having WiFi though, and I discovered the OpenEVSE after my purchase. I'm pretty tech savvy, and for the WiFi advantage I sometimes regret not getting that instead. I cannot speak for its durability, though.
Per the ClipperCreek website, the charging power of the LCS-20 is 16 amp (3.8kW max.) The required supply circuit is 208V/240V @ 20 amp.

I've never had an issue with coiling and uncoiling the 25 ft. length of the charging cord on my ClipperCreek EVSE. I appreciate the flexibility a longer charging cord provides. In any event you would be hard pressed to find a charging cord much longer than 28 -30 ft. without using an EVSE charging extension cord (these do exist, are not inexpensive.)
 

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Per the ClipperCreek website, the charging power of the LCS-20 is 16 amp (3.8kW max.) The required supply circuit is 208V/240V @ 20 amp.

I've never had an issue with coiling and uncoiling the 25 ft. length of the charging cord on my ClipperCreek EVSE. I appreciate the flexibility a longer charging cord provides. In any event you would be hard pressed to find a charging cord much longer than 28 -30 ft. without using an EVSE charging extension cord (these do exist, are not inexpensive.)
Ahh yes you're right. I don't have the LCS-20, I have an LCS-25, which supplies 20 amps or 4.8 Kw (slightly confusing as to why they couldn't use the number to specify amps).
 
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