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Discussion Starter #1
I'm a new owner of a Volt since Earth Day (happy coincidence) and am now considering getting a 220 charger mounted. Which brand is the most reliable, and how much should I prepare to pay for installation? :confused:

Is it a good idea to have my local Chevrolet dealer supply and install? I'm thinking about possible warranty issues in a situation where something goes wrong

What are your thoughts? I apologize if this topic has been discussed to death in another thread. :).
 

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Just a few questions/thoughts:

  1. Have you checked out the "Similar Threads" listed at the bottom of the page?
  2. Have you done a search for threads with EVSE in the title?
  3. Do you have any 240V outlet at all, as in a dryer outlet?
  4. Are you charging in a garage or outdoors? Private house, apartment, condo?
  5. How far is your panel from the charging location?
  6. Do you want to spend the absolute minimum possible, or future your install for a future EV that may be able to charge at a much faster rate?
  7. Describe where any wiring will need to be run? Through finished walls, open-stud garage, conduit?
  8. Are you aware that your OEM EVSE is capable of charging at 240V and 12A by using a pigtail adapter?
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Here's what I've got so far. Didn't know there was a test. LOL

Just a few questions/thoughts:

  1. Have you checked out the "Similar Threads" listed at the bottom of the page? YES, NOW
  2. Have you done a search for threads with EVSE in the title? UUGH!
  3. Do you have any 240V outlet at all, as in a dryer outlet? YES
  4. Are you charging in a garage or outdoors? Private house, apartment, condo? OUTDOORS, PRIVATE HOUSE
  5. How far is your panel from the charging location? 25 FT
  6. Do you want to spend the absolute minimum possible, or future your install for a future EV that may be able to charge at a much faster rate? DON'T KNOW
  7. Describe where any wiring will need to be run? Through finished walls, open-stud garage, conduit? OUTSIDE WALL
  8. Are you aware that your OEM EVSE is capable of charging at 240V and 12A by using a pigtail adapter? YES, BUT NOT SURE IF I CAN PLUG IT INTO A 220 WITHOUT MODIFYING IT MORE THAN ADDING A PIGTAIL
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I've read that the 110 EVSE that came with the car needs some interior soldering to work in 220. Then I've read that it's a plug and play as long as you have a pigtail adapter cord. Which is correct? I'd hate to plug my EVSE into a 220 outlet and end up frying the EVSE or the car.

Many of the posts about installing a 220 chargers
are from 11-12. Does 400 bucks still sound like a reasonable price to have one installed?
 

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Here's what I've got so far. Didn't know there was a test. LOL
How do you expect anybody to estimate a cost when you give absolutely no info what you want or how it needs to be installed?

See http://gm-volt.com/forum/showthread.php?218442 . Consider running an extension cord from the existing outlet and buying an adapter for $60, and you are done. $300-$500 might get an external outlet with conduit on outside of house (if that's what you meant by "outside wall."
 

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Discussion Starter #7

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I've read that the 110 EVSE that came with the car needs some interior soldering to work in 220. Then I've read that it's a plug and play as long as you have a pigtail adapter cord. Which is correct? I'd hate to plug my EVSE into a 220 outlet and end up frying the EVSE or the car.
If you have the EVSE that came with a 2016 or newer Volt, it's just a pigtail that is needed. If you have a first gen (2011-2015) Some can be modified with internal soldering, others are 110 only. I believe the 2013+ require internal modification with the 11/12's being 110 only.

As for options. Pretty much anything out there that your budget can handle will work fine for the Volt. If you see yourself upgrading to another EV or EREV in the future that has a higher rated charger than the Volts 3.3/3.6kW onboard charger then you might consider a 30 or 40 amp unit. If not, anything that's in the 20 amp range will be suitable for full speed charging.

One side note regarding the use of a pigtail on the stock EVSE for the Gen 2 volt is that it will be limited to 12 amps. It's not a significant decrease, but will require about an additional 30-45 minutes to charge when compared to the full 16 amps that a traditional EVSE can offer. If you're mainly doing overnight charging, this won't impact you since you'll get a full charge in about 5 hours from a completely depleted battery.

If you wish to pick up a pretty cheap EVSE, there are a few threads on the Duosida EVSE which can be had for under $200. The nice thing about that unit is that it's also a dual voltage depending on which style plug is installed (no modifications needed, just plug swap) and will allows a full 16 amp output at 220V. ChrisTX did a review of sorts on it and his conclusion suggested that it's a reasonably well built unit. On a side note, he also sells an adapter pigtail to use 220 on your existing 2016+ EVSE.
 

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But if you are intent on buying one, Clipper Creek is a forum favorite. Made in the USA, solid, and inexpensive. A 16A EVSE will do, but if you want to spend some money now, you might be able to future proof with a 30 or 40A EVSE. I wouldn't as who knows, maybe the next vehicle might run off of a Mr Fusion and a flux capacitor.

I paid way too much for my Bosch SPX 30A EVSE and should have saved my money instead of trying to maximize my state EVSE rebate. With two ex state governors in jail and the state budgets in shambles, I could have lived without the state's $850 that they gave me for my trouble.
 

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I bought a wall-mounted giant EVSE and only charge Volt/ELR. A do-over would be a portable unit. Dual voltage would be good, but not necessary since the cars came with 110v units.

Today, I'd either buy a CC 20-amp or a 2016/17 OEM and use an adapter for 220. Neither were available five years ago.

Buying a large unit to "future proof" is over-rated. It's been 5 years (7 for some) and the only things with a bigger battery than Volt are not "better" than my ELR.
 

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As you can see most of the responses have been about using this EVSE instead of that one or using an adapter plug for your OEM unit. But the real thing is getting a 240 volt outlet to a convenient location that's near where your car is parked. Unless you're real handy with electrical work, you'll want to hire an electrician to install an outlet. His price (sorry, or her's) will depend on how close is your breaker box, whether or not it has available capacity to install another circuit, and how difficult will it be to run the wire. This is where you want to future proof yourself. Run a line as if you're going to install a 40amp EVSE, even if you have no plans to do that right now. If your plans change later, then you wont have to have a costly rewire.

BTW...My vote is for the adapter plug for your OEM unit. My second choice would be the Clipper creek. Proven to be very reliable and affordable.
 

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" This is where you want to future proof yourself. Run a line as if you're going to install a 40amp EVSE, even if you have no plans to do that right now. If your plans change later, then you wont have to have a costly rewire."

What if your plans don't pan out. I can think of several scenarios where selecting a 40-amp installation could be obsolete.

- Car ownership might be too expensive. TAAS (transportation as a service) could take over the current paradigm.
- 40-amps is too small. Some Tesla owners have 80-amps.
- 40-amps is too big. For a 40-mile commute, 16 amps will fully top off ANY EV in ~4 hours.
- Do you drive 200mi/day? Might consider moving instead of driving.
- VR/AR could be a better reality. Transporting your physical body is rarely needed.
- Solar. Either cars charge themselves in the sun, or, panels charge the car directly as D.C. not A.C.
 

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I've read that the 110 EVSE that came with the car needs some interior soldering to work in 220. Then I've read that it's a plug and play as long as you have a pigtail adapter cord. Which is correct? I'd hate to plug my EVSE into a 220 outlet and end up frying the EVSE or the car.

Many of the posts about installing a 220 chargers
are from 11-12. Does 400 bucks still sound like a reasonable price to have one installed?
http://gm-volt.com/forum/showthread.php?218442-Gen2-Volt-EVSE-conversion-to-L2-L1-combo-DONE!&highlight=chris

Pay attention to what is being said in the post.
 

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Although I have no Volt, I do have a 230 VAC Level 2 EMW JuiceBox EVSE built from a kit in 2014 (see my signature). Here in the forums I posted pictures of this EVSE, which is designed to handle up to 80 Amps or 16 kW. I have upgraded all the interior wires for 80 amps, but for now it is wired externally for 40 A and set to 30 A (7.2 kW), which GM seems to have guessed and set the 2017 Chevy Bolt EV to that same power. The total cost was less than $300 since I did all the work myself as an EE with over 40 years of experience.

EMotorWerks (https://emotorwerks.com/) sells many EVSE models (no more kits), and has DC chargers, too, but only has the CHAdeMO interface, although they are working on the SAE CCS interface for the Chevy Bolt Ev and others. Look at their models and ask questions before choosing and buying.

I have in a way "future proofed" myself for other EVs, and if I do buy up to two BEVs, I will also buy and install the DC charger myself. My local utility power service is all underground (piped) and my service transformer is less than fifty feet away across the street, so I can add a new 100 A or more 230 VAC service for this DC charger (25 KW or more).
 

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I'm using a https://www.amazon.com/JuiceBox-WiFi-equipped-Electric-Vehicle-Charging/dp/B00UB9R4KO/ref=sr_1_1?s=automotive&ie=UTF8&qid=1496506359&sr=1-1&keywords=juicebox+pro+40 for my 2017 Volt.

It cost me $189.00 to put in a NEMA 14-50 plug for the JuiceBox and I also had a additional 110 volt wall plug installed next to the 240 volt outlet for other purposes.

My Volt with charge in 3.5 hours when the remaining mileage is showing 3 miles. The JuiceBox can also send texts for things like charging started, charging ended, plus I can start and stop charging from my iPhone and see various stats on the cars charging history.

I'm happy with my 240 volt charger. The other charger I looked at was the ClipperCreek HCS-40 which was recommended by several people. The Clipper Creek is also on Amazon here: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00TJD0ZW2?psc=1
 

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Any popular L2 EVSE will work great with both generation Volts (Gen 1 has 3.3kw charger, and Gen 2 has 3.6kw charger, and all L2 EVSEs I know can meet or exceed these requirements). For the Volt, I highly recommend Clipper Creek LCS20: https://store.clippercreek.com/lcs-20-lcs-20p-16-amp-level-2-ev-charging-station

If you have a Gen 2 Volt and don't mind slower charging (but still faster than L1), the EVSE that comes with the vehicle can be converted to L2 with a simple plug adapter!

Finally, when it comes to wiring for your garage .. try to invest more there so you can support 40A or better, in future.
 

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If I had to buy another Duosida's $165 shipped unit would be the way to go
 
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