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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A new Chevy bolt seems to start at $35k once it hits the showroom. A used Model 3 is fetching $45K to $60k.
VW ID4 are around $40k with RWD. Hyundai/Kia are starting $40k to $50K.

Where is this affordable $25K BEV that's supposed to be coming out? Is it going be $25K with a battery or is that a $15K option?
 

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Vaporware. I wouldn't think that there could ever be a $25k, new EV. Especially adjusting for inflation.:) There wasn't really ever a $35k Model 3 that was promised. It was a discounted $38,000 car with locked features, if you could find one.
 

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The Tesla $25,000 car made good clickbait but don't hold your breath.
 

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The Model 2 wouldn't match Tesla's image of a premier EV. Hopefully we'll see one of the legacy auto makers bring their prices down via volume to create an entry level EV. Just don't hold your breath.
 

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One issue is that 250 miles is now almost considered the minimum range that customers are accepting.
(even if it is a commute car --- certainly winter range and need to race to a hospital require some extra range beyond your normal commute distance, tho).

KEEP in mind:
"The average price Americans paid for a new car topped $47,000 for the first time in December 2022. The average final transaction price last month was $47,077. The figure caps off a year of unprecedented price increases. Jan 14, 2022"
Via: https://www.kbb.com/car-news/average-new-car-price-tops-47000
 

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The Tesla $25,000 car made good clickbait but don't hold your breath.
The Model 2 wouldn't match Tesla's image of a premier EV. Hopefully we'll see one of the legacy auto makers bring their prices down via volume to create an entry level EV. Just don't hold your breath.
Who said USA?
All indicates are Tesla Giga Shanghai where small cars and related distance makes more 'sense'. They even have R&D there.
 

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Battery production costs would have to come way down before they are price competitive with gas cars. They are far from that yet.
 
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They are in no rush as they can't make enough of the high priced cars. GM has an Ultium SUV coming out for $30,000. BYD has the Dolphin at $20,000 ($25,000 landed if they import to your area). Not counting super small city cars. They are on the verge. Tesla will need another factory. You typically start at the top and work down the market segments. Since low priced cars have less profit, they are the last segment to be filled. First they will have to sort out the supply chain problem, build the extra battery factories. With everybody bringing out multiple new models there will be no race to the bottom end. It's not about how many vehicles you make, it's about how much money you can make as new technology is expensive to start up.
 

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The Tesla $25,000 car made good clickbait but don't hold your breath.
I'll probably never pay more than $25K for a car, yet I'll never get a car with a MSRP less than $40K. Does not make sense? Used market ;)


Jokes aside. I would define an affordable car as any car below average in cost and the average cost today with today's inflation is $45K+.

$25K? I would call that budget car. And if you are really on a budget, then buy used.
 

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Tesla is selling every mid to high range car they can make. Why would they spend time and money to build a budget car when they still have factories to build and expand to meet the needs of that market. GM said they are going after that market ($30,000 and below) to get the jump on Tesla (at least in number of cars sold). They are introducing the Equinox next year, still at $30,000 despite increases in raw materials.
 

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GM needs to sell 3 times as many cars as Tesla to make the same operating profit. A $25K car is probably not good for their business. Tesla has made bare-bones Model S (40kWhr) and $35K Model 3, but the more expensive models were better values and there was not a huge demand for those models, so they canceled the bare-bones models. Talk is cheap and people vote with their $.

There are discussions of a more budget model for the Asian market that will be designed and built in the Shanghai factory, but I would not expect that model to come to the US. China is the biggest car market in the world and big on EVs. This model will be smaller and more budget than the Model 3.

A ~$25K EV sounds like a Nissan Leaf. Check that out.
 

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Given the cheapest Tesla currently available begins at $47k, I believe the $25k Tesla AIN'T GONNA HAPPEN.:eek:
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
Out of those choices, the updated Chevy Bolt would be the one I would consider for long range and selling price. Unfortunately, they're still having battery issues and not even allowed to sell it right now.

$30K to $35K is in the sweet spot of affordable EV. The Nissan Leaf has an outdated CHAdeMO port and no thermal battery management. The rest of the pack are too expensive even with the $7500 tax credit which I may or may not qualify.
 

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Out of those choices, the updated Chevy Bolt would be the one I would consider for long range and selling price. Unfortunately, they're still having battery issues and not even allowed to sell it right now.
Maybe you are referring to old news, microVolt?

My 2017 battery was replaced about a month ago (gained an additional 29 miles over the original battery). No issues. And the Bolt EV and EUV production line restarted April 4.
 
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$30K to $35K is in the sweet spot of affordable EV.
Perspective.

For the first time ever, the average price of a new car has edged past $47,000, according to a new report from Kelley Blue Book and data from TrueCar, a CR partner that provides market analysis and an online marketplace for cars.
 
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