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Discussion Starter #1
Is it better to use Regen on Demand instead of breaking?

I tried playing with it while doing my test drive. I noticed that the car will come to a stop, but not as quickly as if you step on brake pedal.

So if you have the option of a slow stop, would you use Regen on Demand (behind steering wheel) or brake pedal?

What has been the experience of using Regen on Demand while at high speed? In my test drive, I did not go that fast while trying Regen on Demand.
 

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Is it better to use Regen on Demand instead of breaking?

I tried playing with it while doing my test drive. I noticed that the car will come to a stop, but not as quickly as if you step on brake pedal.

So if you have the option of a slow stop, would you use Regen on Demand (behind steering wheel) or brake pedal?

What has been the experience of using Regen on Demand while at high speed? In my test drive, I did not go that fast while trying Regen on Demand.
Define "better"? I mean, the floor pedal does "regen on demand", as the paddle does, and in a wider range of power than just that single set point, and with the added bonus of automatically blending in additional friction if you need more slowing than the regen alone can manage.
 

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I find the 'Regen' paddle will slow my Volt until about 2mph but not to a complete stop. When coming up to a stop (or coasting through a turn), I always use the paddle until I need to actually stop the car - then I use the brake.
 

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IMO the pedal works better than the paddle. Both devices regen, but the pedal is variable where the paddle is just one speed. The slower you stop, the greater efficiency of regen.

The Volt is amazingly good with figuring out how to max regen from the pedal before mixing in friction brakes. A lot of people get OCD and think the friction brakes might be activating because they are pressing the same pedal, but the Volt will only apply friction brakes only if you command stopping at a speed faster than max regen can do alone.

Using the pedal, IMO, is also safer because it allows for faster emergency breaking if things go unexpectedly. Your foot is already there.
 

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I use the regen on a downhill run from the Hwy 17 Santa Cruz Summit to Los Gatos. It seems like the regen paddle and the brake regen both have their place.

Just curious, does the regen paddle activate the brake lights?
 

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Thanks. I figured the brake light would be required, but I hadn't looked into it.

No wonder people probably think I'm crazy when they see the brake light flashing on and off.
 

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I use the regen on a downhill run from the Hwy 17 Santa Cruz Summit to Los Gatos. It seems like the regen paddle and the brake regen both have their place.

Just curious, does the regen paddle activate the brake lights?
Driving in L works very well with long grades. In many cases, just "shift to low and go" is all you need to do. When at the bottom of the hill, shift back to D.

In L, use the accelerator to decrease or increase regen as you need to control speed. Just like pressing the brake pedal doesn't mean you are activating the friction brakes, pressing the accelerator doesn't necessary mean you are putting power into the motor. On most steep downgrades, you will be putting energy back into the pack even with the accelerator pressed (If in doubt, watch the little DIC energy display). The computer will figure out how to manage regen up and down to match your driving commands. Best of all, the brake lights don't illuminate unless you really do need to hit the brake pedal. Using the paddles on hills makes you looks like a clueless driver riding the brakes all the way down the hill.
 

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The brake pedal allows infinite variability, as opposed to the fixed amount you get from the paddle. Additionally, that fixed level of regen is not as efficient as coasting or light braking. I think the paddle is just a marketing gizmo. The concept looks sexy in the sales brochures, but in practice it's not really as effective as coasting in "D" or light braking over longer distances as far as efficient regen is concerned.
 

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Most of the time, driving in D and using the brakes will give y out better electric range than L or any regen on demand. The reason why is as you are approaching stopped cars at a red light, you will lift the accelerator earlier and coast. If you are a habitual regen paddle person, you will stay on the accelerator until the perfect lift point then slow quickly to 2 mph then brake. all of this wastes the momentum you've put into the car by staying on the accelerator. If you coast early enough you might get lucky and the light turns green and you get to roll thought the light without wasting your momentum. regen is only about 70% efficient which means you are wasting 30% of your momentum trying to recapture it back into the battery. So avoiding regen is better than using any mechanism that causes regen (paddle, L, or brake pedal).
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Define "better"? I mean, the floor pedal does "regen on demand", as the paddle does, and in a wider range of power than just that single set point, and with the added bonus of automatically blending in additional friction if you need more slowing than the regen alone can manage.
I am trying to understand the rationale behind this fancy button because as you correctly said, the floor pedal also does "regen on demand".
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I find the 'Regen' paddle will slow my Volt until about 2mph but not to a complete stop. When coming up to a stop (or coasting through a turn), I always use the paddle until I need to actually stop the car - then I use the brake.
That's what I also experienced.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks everyone! You confirmed what I was thinking but was not totally sure about. It all makes sense.
 

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Driving in L works very well with long grades. In many cases, just "shift to low and go" is all you need to do. When at the bottom of the hill, shift back to D.

In L, use the accelerator to decrease or increase regen as you need to control speed. Just like pressing the brake pedal doesn't mean you are activating the friction brakes, pressing the accelerator doesn't necessary mean you are putting power into the motor. On most steep downgrades, you will be putting energy back into the pack even with the accelerator pressed (If in doubt, watch the little DIC energy display). The computer will figure out how to manage regen up and down to match your driving commands. Best of all, the brake lights don't illuminate unless you really do need to hit the brake pedal. Using the paddles on hills makes you looks like a clueless driver riding the brakes all the way down the hill.
Thanks. I'm learning more about the Volt every day. It's very counterintuitive when going downhill in L, and you have to push the accellerator pedal down further to keep up with traffic.
 

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I am trying to understand the rationale behind this fancy button because as you correctly said, the floor pedal also does "regen on demand".
The rationale is to provide different tools to use regenerative breaking.

They don't change efficiency in itself, as its is mostly your way of driving that really affects efficiency, but they can provide different experiences. L and the paddle for example allow you to less often switch your foot between the accelerator and brake pedal (one pedal driving).

This is a new way to drive with electric cars, and you should try it for a few weeks (month) so you can build the motor skills associated with them. Then you can make up your mind on whether you like it or not, or what are the circumstances where they provide you with a more comfortable driving experience.

But it is mostly a matter of preference :)
 

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I am trying to understand the rationale behind this fancy button because as you correctly said, the floor pedal also does "regen on demand".
Because the ELR has it and it's a new toy for folks to play with. I"ve called "gimmick" for months now, though I don't have a gen2. If I had one, I'd probably use it while driving like speed racer, but I know I won't be fooling myself thinking that maximizing the use of the regen paddle actually helps your overall mileage.
 

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Because the ELR has it and it's a new toy for folks to play with. I"ve called "gimmick" for months now, though I don't have a gen2. If I had one, I'd probably use it while driving like speed racer, but I know I won't be fooling myself thinking that maximizing the use of the regen paddle actually helps your overall mileage.
I definitely would not call it a gimmick. I have gotten so used to the paddle in fact that I now instinctively reach for it in vain in my other cars. In my opinion, it makes for a more pleasant driving experience.
 

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I definitely would not call it a gimmick. I have gotten so used to the paddle in fact that I now instinctively reach for it in vain in my other cars. In my opinion, it makes for a more pleasant driving experience.
Same here. I was driving my Suburban semi-off road last weekend. Kept thinking how nice that paddle would have been.

Paddle really works best with "L". Way too abrupt with "D".
 

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I definitely would not call it a gimmick. I have gotten so used to the paddle in fact that I now instinctively reach for it in vain in my other cars. In my opinion, it makes for a more pleasant driving experience.
Just don't rear end another car reaching for the regen paddle in vain....same goes to the sport L drivers who lift the accelerator and expect heavy regen. Don't try that with your ICE vehicles.
 
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