GM Volt Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Seems like a basic question but I am getting conflicting answers.

Bought a 2018 Volt LT about 3 weeks ago and want to make sure the main battery lasts as long as possible. I didn't see anywhere in the manual if it is okay to charge the battery at any time or only when completely dead. I called GM and they told me to charge it only when completely dead to prevent battery memory. From the messages on this forum, most seem to charge it at any time.

Not sure if it matters but I am using the supplied 120 volt charger now but I am having the 240 level 2 installed soon. Not sure if there are different opinions depending on voltage.

Any recommendations on when it's okay to charge it?
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
20,460 Posts
Charge fully or partially any time you want to. My car is plugged in unless it's being driven. 7 Years and 96k miles later, all is well.

Battery memory? LOL, nope.

Your options are 120V or 240V, the car takes care of the rest.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,416 Posts
My battery has memory. It remembers to accept the same amount of charge it accepted yesterday. :rolleyes:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,821 Posts
You can charge your Volt on 120V or 240V and the only measurable difference is 240V charging is much faster to charge. Technically charging at higher power levels can affect battery life but here we are talking about a maximum power level (3.6kW) that is so far below 1C (the total battery capacity) being 18.4 kWh as to be insignificant.

240V charging is more efficient than 120V charging because any time you are charging and converting AC voltage to DC voltage there are conversion losses and heat losses. Faster charging means less total energy lost during the charging cycle.

There is no harm done if you leave the Volt plugged in for up to 4 weeks. You can find recommendations in the owners manual for what to do if you need to park your Volt for more than 4 weeks.

Depending on your driving needs you can charge every day, or whenever you need to charge. Depending on where you are located you should leave the Volt plugged in during summer so that the temperature management system can cool the battery if needed. In winter you may want to leave the Volt plugged in to keep the battery temperature above 30F and ready to be used at all times. Plus, preconditioning while plugged in during winter is a luxury you will soon become addicted to using.

It has been stated that the Volt's battery has been designed and tested for up to 8000 full charge/discharge cycles. This is the equivalent of charging twice a day for almost 11 years. Partial charging cycles do not count the same as full charge/discharge cycles. The parts that may wear out such as the Volt's charging port and the J1772 charging connector are relatively inexpensive and easily replaced.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,466 Posts
I left my Volt plugged in at 8 amps for 11 days while on a trip overseas. According to VoltStats, it quit sending data after 5 days and apparently went to sleep. While on the trip, I used the phone app to check on it, and it woke up and did send data that one day, then went back to sleep.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
514 Posts
I only charge mine when it's below 50% SOC - Usually the night before I need to use it

Don
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,538 Posts
To the OP, who at GM told you this?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,298 Posts
OP, Li-Ion batteries don't develop "memory" like the older Ni-Cad and NiMH batteries do. What will kill a Li-On battery is fully charging and fully discharging. The Volt knows and prevents the battery from ever fully charge or discharge.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Obviously I was told the wrong information by GM.

I had called the Volt advisor (800) 263-3777 that was listed on the mychevrolet app.

It will be the last time I call them, this forum offers far more knowledge.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,416 Posts
OP, Li-Ion batteries don't develop "memory" like the older Ni-Cad and NiMH batteries do. What will kill a Li-On battery is fully charging and fully discharging. The Volt knows and prevents the battery from ever fully charge or discharge.
Bingo.....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,466 Posts
I personally like to wake up to a full "tank" of battery power every morning.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,612 Posts
well , I have my electric exercise bike connected to an 12 volt to 120 volt inverter so I can charge the car MYSELF and not just let the car do it for itself :) (just kidding - but I still want to try it - will need 4 more people as 120 Watts is ALL I can do in the morning.

Ever wonder why Ni-Cads worked so well for a long time in space- the groups that did that spent the time to learn how to make better chargers/match the cells and watch the cells not just the whole string. You can not just use a resistor to control battery charging.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,032 Posts
OP, Li-Ion batteries don't develop "memory" like the older Ni-Cad and NiMH batteries do. What will kill a Li-On battery is fully charging and fully discharging. The Volt knows and prevents the battery from ever fully charge or discharge.
And overly fast charging or discharging. Or charging while excessively hot. The car's onboard charger limits the former WAY more than enough, and the battery thermal management system resolves the latter. (And "overly-fast" charging is much faster than any GM product charges, and faster than even Tesla product currently manages. Lithium Ion is at risk when you're charging at twice the pack's capacity per hour.)
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top