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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I was removing my wheels today and ran into an issue: one wheel would NOT come off. It was firmly "glued" to the hub. I was thinking, "how the heck will I get this wheel off? What if I was needing to change a flat?"

Fortunately, I found an easy solution:


After removing the wheel, I cleaned up the hub with a wire brush. Someone else here posted how they cut out plastic separators from a paper thin sheet of clear plastic. There is some discussion that the plastic is not needed and may even melt at high braking temperatures potentially causing the wheel to be lose and wobble. So I think I'll try anti-seize or maybe high temperature paint instead.

However, if you want to cut out your own plastic separators and give that a try, here is a PDF pattern you can print out:
Volt-Dielectric-Wheel-Shim.jpg here is the PDF: View attachment Volt Dielectric Wheel Shim.pdf
 

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I was removing my wheels today and ran into an issue: one wheel would NOT come off. It was firmly "glued" to the hub. I was thinking, "how the heck will I get this wheel off? What if I was needing to change a flat?"

Fortunately, I found an easy solution:


After removing the wheel, I cleaned up the hub with a wire brush. Someone else here posted how they cut out plastic separators from a paper thin sheet of clear plastic. I may try that. or maybe a thin wipe of oil.
Bottle jack method works well to remove stuck wheel...:)
 

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Hi, Steverino!

The guy who placed a plastic high temp film is me. :)

http://gm-volt.com/forum/showthread.php?21922-Wheel-corrosion-because-of-two-different-metals-...

I did also spray some clear coat paint on the bare aluminum surface of the wheel,
and did remove and paint (with high temp. paint) the disk rotors. (A bit of paint on the friction surface of the rotors
do get scrubbed off at the first or second time you depress the brake pedal to stop the Volt. Non friction surfaces of the
rotors do stay clean.

For the plastic films placed between the wheel and the rotor,
I placed those in november 2012 and they are still there. There was no wheel that felt, came apart,
and the car did ride perfectly as usual. The plastic films stayed as nice as the day I installed them.
they are 3 mils thick.

I also replaced the steel lug nuts by aluminum lug nuts. There was another thread I started about this.
They look a bit better IMHO than the OEM lug nuts.

Result so far: no corrosion on the inside surface of the wheel, No corrosion on the wheel hub surface
(behind the disk rotor - visible with the rotor removed.) No corrosion on the contact surfaces where the
lug nuts contacts the wheel. :) The wheel is EASY to remove, to do the rotations (I do rotations twice per
year, when I put the winter wheels at fall, and the summer wheels at spring).

So, if you have the time and energy to do this kind of proactive preventive maintenance, it's well worth it, and recommend it.

Francois & Line
B2653 & C19249
 

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Discussion Starter #4

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Discussion Starter #5
Hi, Steverino!

The guy who placed a plastic high temp film is me. :)
I thought that was a clever and inexpensive solution, frankydude. I'm wondering if a thin coat of Permatex anti-sieze would do the trick too. The center hubs get corroded as well as the plate the holding the lug nuts.
 

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Yes, I have a bottle of jack daniels. Drink it before or after? :)
Close...Bottle jack on its side and a length of steel pipe or 2x4 and you can just push it off...:)
 

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suggestions:

get a jack stand under that car.

place lug nuts on loosely. this way if it comes off standsthe wheel is still there).

can go from back side with a 4 by 4 (prefered) and punch wheel off.

never sieze the inside center hub.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for all the suggestions :)

Yes, I have a second jack for added support/safety.

Two kicks as in the video and the stuck wheel popped right off. I'll keep the bottle jack idea in mind for more recalcitrant wheels!
 

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I thought that was a clever and inexpensive solution, frankydude. I'm wondering if a thin coat of Permatex anti-sieze would do the trick too. The center hubs get corroded as well as the plate the holding the lug nuts.
My neighbor uses effectively the Permatex with copper on the hub bearing / disk rotor touching surfaces
with success against seizing. He also puts some on the rotor / wheel surface.

I prefer paint, as it's cleaner, and gives a better / nicer look.
Once you put Permatex, you cannot paint it.

Francois
B2653
 

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Bottle Jack can bend wheel .... Why not try the GM method ... Have Wheel nuts on but fractionally lose - lower car - if that doesn't do it drive it forward /back - should pop.

GM says you should put a bit of grease on the inner ID after you clean it up......
Glad we don't have these problems in Oz - must be your winters and salt on the roads = ugly...
 

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I have aluminum wheels and steel hubs on my 1995 Buick Regal, and I knew that they could stick or seize due to chemical reactions. My solution for the next 18 years is to coat the inside of the wheel (where the mating surfaces are) with silicon spray. It is clear, waterproof, and non-greasy. The heat from braking will not deteriorate the surface or remove the silicon coating.

I don't know if GM recommends using such a solution, but this problem is identical to the spark plug seizing for aluminum engine blocks. I had a 1975 Chevy Vega with the 2.3 L aluminum block, and it was a must to use anti-seizing (based on graphite) on the four plugs.
 

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Hello fellow Volt owners and non Volt owners.

I had this problem with my last car (BMW). Have to do winter tires with RWD in my climate. I'm not sure if this is the best method so please use caution if you decide to try this method. I take no responsibility. I am merely commeting. In the driveway, what I did was I loosened the lug bolts just a bit and move the car forward. I got it up to 10 km/h and braked hard. This separated the wheel from the hub without having to kick the wheel off like the video. I believe kicking the wheel over time damaged my front steering components so I don't recommend the video. I did not find any amount of spray or lube to prevent the sticking/freezing following the next wheel rotation cycle.
 

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Hello fellow Volt owners and non Volt owners.

I had this problem with my last car (BMW). Have to do winter tires with RWD in my climate. I'm not sure if this is the best method so please use caution if you decide to try this method. I take no responsibility. I am merely commeting. In the driveway, what I did was I loosened the lug bolts just a bit and move the car forward. I got it up to 10 km/h and braked hard. This separated the wheel from the hub without having to kick the wheel off like the video. I believe kicking the wheel over time damaged my front steering components so I don't recommend the video. I did not find any amount of spray or lube to prevent the sticking/freezing following the next wheel rotation cycle.
I would like to emphasize that the above suggestion is
the exact method described in the Volt official service
manual to remove a stuck wheel.

However, I always prefer that my wheels never get stuck
by the corrosion of two different metals;-)

Francois
B2653
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I have wire brushed all the corrosion on both the stud plate and the center hub. I brushed on a thin coating of anti-seize and remounted the wheels. Next time I rotate the tires, I'll see how well that works. Banging does seem like a last resort kind of thing.
 

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Hello fellow Volt owners and non Volt owners.

I had this problem with my last car (BMW). Have to do winter tires with RWD in my climate. I'm not sure if this is the best method so please use caution if you decide to try this method. I take no responsibility. I am merely commeting. In the driveway, what I did was I loosened the lug bolts just a bit and move the car forward. I got it up to 10 km/h and braked hard. This separated the wheel from the hub without having to kick the wheel off like the video. I believe kicking the wheel over time damaged my front steering components so I don't recommend the video. I did not find any amount of spray or lube to prevent the sticking/freezing following the next wheel rotation cycle.
You need quite a super serious kicking to be able
To damage the suspension parts.
Lets remember that those parts must "survive" to
Potholes impacts, which have greater force than
tire kicking.

Francois
B2653
 

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I had a wheel that was firmly stuck to the hub of my previous car. I clipped a curb in the parking lot and the tire was quickly deflating so I jacked it up to remove it. No amount of beating or kicking would budge it. My solution was to put the lug not on, just barely touching the rim and then drop the car back down. I then proceeded to drive a few feet and jerk the steering wheel a few feet and presto! Jacked it back up and the wheel came right off.
 

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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
I had a wheel that was firmly stuck to the hub of my previous car. I clipped a curb in the parking lot and the tire was quickly deflating so I jacked it up to remove it. No amount of beating or kicking would budge it. My solution was to put the lug not on, just barely touching the rim and then drop the car back down. I then proceeded to drive a few feet and jerk the steering wheel a few feet and presto! Jacked it back up and the wheel came right off.
Thanks, emartin00. I see this loosen, drive & stop method discussed elsewhere on the web. Loosened (but snug) lug nuts sounds a bit dangerous to me—not to mention some extra work to unjack the car—but apparently it is the "official" way to go. Hopefully the anti-seize (or plastic dielectric separators) will make this a moot point.

I have added a pattern to my initial post that can be used to cut out a plastic separator for those that want to try that method.
 

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You need quite a super serious kicking to be able
To damage the suspension parts.
Lets remember that those parts must "survive" to
Potholes impacts, which have greater force than
tire kicking.

Francois
B2653
My thoughts are potholes and bumps have your suspension travelling up and down which is what its designed for. The hard kicking and smashing it with a mallot has your wheel travelling in and out not what it was designed for. Kind of like bumping a curb. Does that make sense? I can't explain all the loose and worn out steering and suspension parts on my old car (BMW). I like old method of moving it forward better than kicking it off with force.
 

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My thoughts are potholes and bumps have your suspension travelling up and down which is what its designed for. The hard kicking and smashing it with a mallot has your wheel travelling in and out not what it was designed for. Kind of like bumping a curb. Does that make sense? I can't explain all the loose and worn out steering and suspension parts on my old car (BMW). I like old method of moving it forward better than kicking it off with force.
What about hitting a pot when turning left or right? Aren't there side forces involved?
 
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