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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
On a couple of recent trips I averaged about 140MPGe. These were just regular nothing special type trips around town. I did not do anything special or take extra care to get more mpge. As you can see from the pics they were both 15-20 miles trips on surface streets with speed between 40-50mph with a few stop lights and stop signs. Climate control was on fan-only mode and outdoor temperature was about 65-67 def Farenheit.
Car was fully occupied with passengers, not driving solo.
Tire psi on dash 37-38 psi.
Age of car - 2800 miles, ~2 months.
Drive mode: "D".

While I average about 102 mpgs in daily use, this is no fluke either, its real, not on a test track but on real roads in a real trip (not short 1-2 mile trips), and it's reproducible.

I am curious to know what is the best mpge others got on similar type of trips.

mpge1.jpg mpge2.jpg
 

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As you evaluate your Volt’s performance using MPGe mileage, keep in mind the Gen 2 Volt’s electric fuel tank holds only a half gallon of "energy equivalence" fuel (window sticker 53 miles/106mpge = 0.5 Ge). Your car is rated at 106 miles per gallon, and it only takes about 2 or 3 cups of such fuel to drive 15-20 miles. Perhaps the relative significance of an MPGe reading obtained from using a minuscule amount of fuel should be treated in the same way one would view the relative significance of similar variations in ev mileage when the distance driven per fuel unit is only a few miles (i.e., for each kWh of power used).

As an example, I live just under 4 miles from a grocery store, and at a slightly higher elevation. On the drive to the store in my 2012 Volt I average 6.3 miles/kWh. On the way home, that drops to 2.2 miles/kWh.

Converted into "energy equivalence" fuel terms, when I drive to the store, I reach 176.4 MPGe. When driving home on the same route, that drops to 60.9 MPGE (these numbers are my calculations, the Gen 1 Volts have no MPGE display).

It’s a shame that we have no good way to talk about Volt fuel performance other than in "gas car" terms (MPG, MPGcs, MPGe). Even miles/kWh is an unsatisfactory measurement because driving conditions can be so variable within each of the distances covered by the consumption of each fuel unit.
 

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The highest I have ever had was 146 MPGe. Only round trips count because that negates any advantage due to terrain.
 
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Discussion Starter #6
Pretty impressive numbers.
It would also be good to know if there's anything peculiar about the drive or driving, or not. For example, if almost all miles are in stop and go or very short or very low speed trips, unusual terrain, tire pressure, etc.. Or is it just a regular city+hwy+stopandgo on fairly flat terrain.
 

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My daily commute is 103 miles r/t with access to charging while I'm at work. There is a 1,200 foot elevation difference between home and work meaning I don't quite get 53 miles on the way to work; the last 6-8 miles is on ICE. I can make it home with 10-15% battery left. I'm using about 8 gallons of gas every 1.5 months or so. I have never looked for "best" but I typically get 250+ MPG. I'm not sure about MPGe.

I've done a few 1,400+ trips in this car to skew my lifetime results but I'm still very pleased.

Screenshot 2018-05-22 09.41.14.jpg
 
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Discussion Starter #8
I got 141 on the way to work today. Up and down terrain over 13 miles of primarily highway, but traffic was a little backed up, going about 50 for most of the drive and using regen braking to maintain a good distance from the car in front of me. Was around 60 degrees in the area and I drove with just the seat heaters on, so pretty ideal conditions for this sort of testing. My energy readout says terrain helped, albeit very slightly. Will report back later today regarding my return mileage.

While slightly off topic, does anyone have any scientific or anecdotal evidence regarding how much tire life is reduced by slight over-inflation (Maybe 39-40psi over the recommended 36)? If it reduces tire life by 10,000+ miles, seems like a waste, but if it's only 1-2K seems worth it.
 

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While slightly off topic, does anyone have any scientific or anecdotal evidence regarding how much tire life is reduced by slight over-inflation (Maybe 39-40psi over the recommended 36)? If it reduces tire life by 10,000+ miles, seems like a waste, but if it's only 1-2K seems worth it.
My personal experience has been that you can actually get better life and more even tire wear by using higher pressure (without ever going over the max pressure on the side of the tire). The pressure listed on the door jamb is usually a compromise between fuel economy and ride comfort. The volt may have less comfort cushion than most vehicles, though. I run a couple of extra pounds. Time will tell. One downside to higher pressure is that the tires are more susceptible to road hazard damage.
 
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Discussion Starter #11
I got 141 on the way to work today. Up and down terrain over 13 miles of primarily highway, but traffic was a little backed up, going about 50 for most of the drive and using regen braking to maintain a good distance from the car in front of me. Was around 60 degrees in the area and I drove with just the seat heaters on, so pretty ideal conditions for this sort of testing. My energy readout says terrain helped, albeit very slightly. Will report back later today regarding my return mileage.
My personal experience has been that you can actually get better life and more even tire wear by using higher pressure (without ever going over the max pressure on the side of the tire). The pressure listed on the door jamb is usually a compromise between fuel economy and ride comfort. The volt may have less comfort cushion than most vehicles, though. I run a couple of extra pounds. Time will tell. One downside to higher pressure is that the tires are more susceptible to road hazard damage.
So at the end of my ride home, I was back to 125 MPGe total, so the return trip was about 109 MPGe. Traffic was moving a bit quicker, but I think the terrain had a lot to do with it. Still, 125 is pretty darn good for a short highway round trip commute.

Will have to give the tire inflation a shot. I'm at 35 all around right now.
 
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