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The problem is the SAE disagrees with you. A "hybrid" by SAE definition must have 2 different sources of energy that directly provide torque for propulsion (from either/or both simultaneously). Since the Volt has only 1 direct source of propulsion, the electric motor drive, it's an electric vehicle (EV) with a range extending feature powered by an ICE- hence E-REV.
WopOnTour
WopOnTour,

Thanks for explaining it so well. The REEV or E-REV nomenclature will stand, because it so simply and perfectly explains the concept.
 

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The problem is the SAE disagrees with you. A "hybrid" by SAE definition must have 2 different sources of energy that directly provide torque for propulsion (from either/or both simultaneously). Since the Volt has only 1 direct source of propulsion, the electric motor drive, it's an electric vehicle (EV) with a range extending feature powered by an ICE- hence E-REV.
WopOnTour
OK WopOn, after reading more of the posts I agree with you and the others. I will try to think E-REV.

But I wager that with 2 more years of exposure to the designation Hybrid before the Volt hits the market the general public will always refer to the Volt as a hybrid. What advertising agency ever felt constrained by standards, or for reality as far as that goes, so they will probably call it a Hybrid as that term conjures up a vision of an electric drive car. GM has two years to create a new vision for the Volt. Maybe they should have named it eVolt.

Christi Landry calls the Volt a Hybrid
 

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It's true, sometimes it's difficult to shed the "historical baggage" when it comes to terminology :eek:

I mean if you think about it, given the context of the new SAE definitions, the term "series hybrid" has become a bit of a misnomer.

In the end, those that know...know
;)
WopOnTour
 

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Thanks. Hadn't seen that. She's very comfortable on camera. They should try to avoid her going on camera.

One thing that struck me as really stupid that is illustrated in this video is that shift lever. I find it really ironic and baffling, that on an electric vehicle, that needs no shift lever, they chose to put one that is actually 2 - 3 times bigger than the ones in a conventional car! This car could have been the push button car of tomorrow that the engineers of my old '62 Dodge Lancer envisioned when they devised a mechanical push button shifter, but no, the interior designers were thinking more like the Model T of yesteryear. Then she goes on to point out that there is a clever little storage area behind the shifter that you can only access when the car is in drive!? This is good design how??!

The exterior design of this car is only boring, but the interior design borders on bizarre to silly. They should have just let the car share the interior with the Cruze, it's much better. Oh well, at this point it is what it is and they aren't going to change it. I hope I can get a chance to meet the interior design guy again. I met him at Volt Nation. I have more questions...
 

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I think the intention was to make it as easy as possible to just get in and just drive it, despite the high technology. People are "used to" shifters, and ignition switches, and rotating knobs for things like volume and temperature.
Ergonomics is a funny thing. People tend to hate change, but once they get "used to it" it's not so bad (the centrally mounted IP gage unit in the Ion comes to mid, which I hated at first but came to appreciate after driving one a while)

Have you ever driven a Prius?
The first time you hop into a Prius and have to figure out where to insert that silly ignition "key" (basically just a security device) and then it's "OK how do I start this thing" followed by "how do I shift into reverse?" and then "how the f**k do I get the damn air conditioning ON (and then commences the video game)
Inspite of the Prius' popularity lots of people are put off by this, at least initially.

Sure once they get some instructions or figure it all out it's not such a big deal, but if you discover you actually like it because it's "different" then fine.
But a great many people feel it shouldn't have to rewrite the basic rules of the driving experience, just because you can.
JMO
WopOnTour
 

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I think the intention was to make it as easy as possible to just get in and just drive it, despite the high technology.
I really believe that if you put four huge buttons on the dash labeled P,R,N and D everybody would figure it out the first time. Moot point. We got the ejection seat handle.:rolleyes:
 

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I get how "D" and "R" work on an electric vehicle, but explain how "P" and "N" work . . .
 

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I get how "D" and "R" work on an electric vehicle, but explain how "P" and "N" work . . .
P is for park, when you want to engage the mechanical brake so that it stays put.

N, is for Never mind, just put it into N when you want to push the car off the cliff. :)
 

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I really believe that if you put four huge buttons on the dash labeled P,R,N and D everybody would figure it out the first time. Moot point. We got the ejection seat handle.:rolleyes:
No, I hear ya, but again have you ever driven a Prius or jumped in some other car with a push-button start?(like a Vette or XLR or perhaps some others) It really throws you for a loop.

I mean on most newer cars the ignition switch is really no longer an "ignition switch" It's just a low voltage (usually 5V) input to one of the modules and then that module "reports" the state of the ignition switch on the network. (the "crank" state for instance) and then all for the network members perform whatever function their firmware dictates they do when in a "crank" power mode. (perhaps nothing or perhaps "energize starter relay for 15 seconds or until min 400 engine rpm is observed")

So a button will suffice, but many people just don't like it. ie They would prefer to rotate a key because that is the normal functionality they are most familiar with.

In the case of the shifter don't you think there would be a lot a people going, "hey wheres the damn shifter" at lease for a bit until they seen the HUGE buttons labeled PRNDM?
Should they change it just for the sake of change?
It wouldn't be that hard, but then again it depends on exactly what transmission is used. ;)
A "Park" assembly usually needs to have a mechanical mechanism to lock the output shaft/s from turning, so maybe that is a cabled mechanism on the Volt... just a possibility
WopOnTour
 

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I had a Prius as a rental car, and had never been in one before. After a brief time, I figured out the "key" and how to start the car. Never had another problem with it. If someone can't spend five seconds to learn how to use new technology, maybe they shouldn't have it.
 

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Oh, propeller heads such as yourself have zero problems ;)
It's the average Joes and Kimbers that end up calling the auto club.
:D
WOT
 

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Should they change it just for the sakechange?
It wouldn't be that hard, but then again it depends on exactly what transmission is used. ;)
A "Park" assembly usually needs to have a mechanical mechanism to lock the output shaft/s from turning, so maybe that is a cabled mechanism on the Volt... just a possibility
WopOnTour
No, they should change it to make it better. Eliminating the mechanical shift mechanism would lower cost, improve reliability and free up console space for something more useful. The locking mechanical pall for the park position can easily be achieved with a solenoid. Again, it's a moot point. They did what they did.
 

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No, they should change it to make it better. Eliminating the mechanical shift mechanism would lower cost, improve reliability and free up console space for something more useful. The locking mechanical pall for the park position can easily be achieved with a solenoid. Again, it's a moot point. They did what they did.
Unfortunately an electric solenoid will likely not be easily configured to meet FMVSS208.
But don't get me wrong,I'm not defending what they've done to the shifter area of the car as there's certainly some kludgyness there IMO. So it certainly may have been just "cobbled" together from existing parts for the pre-production car. So I don't believe your points are moot, as I'm certain these types of details are not cast in stone.
I still think some of what you've stated has merit.
Regards
WopOnTour
 
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