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Does the 200+ mile battery EV provide better value to the user, make better use of the energy infrastructure and is friendlier to the environment than an extended range EV like the Volt? Here's an interesting study on these issues.

"The 2016 Chevrolet Volt with an electric range of 53 miles[2] is the first commercial car that almost qualifies as a PHEVLER.

PHEVLERs[3] are a disruptive technology that will help revolutionize both the clean transportation and the clean stationary energy sectors of our economy. These vehicles are the green machines that will provide a critical part of the renewable and sustainable society that we need for the future.[4] 2016 Chevrolet Volt with an electric range of 53 miles[2] is the first commercial car that almost qualifies as a PHEVLER."


http://www.greencarcongress.com/2016/04/20160422-phevler.html
 

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Does the 200+ mile battery EV provide better value to the user, make better use of the energy infrastructure and is friendlier to the environment than an extended range EV like the Volt? Here's an interesting study on these issues.

"The 2016 Chevrolet Volt with an electric range of 53 miles[2] is the first commercial car that almost qualifies as a PHEVLER.

PHEVLERs[3] are a disruptive technology that will help revolutionize both the clean transportation and the clean stationary energy sectors of our economy. These vehicles are the green machines that will provide a critical part of the renewable and sustainable society that we need for the future.[4] 2016 Chevrolet Volt with an electric range of 53 miles[2] is the first commercial car that almost qualifies as a PHEVLER."


http://www.greencarcongress.com/2016/04/20160422-phevler.html
This is what most of us have been saying all along. At the moment, cars like the Volt (EREV) are the best overall compromise for a primary vehicle for most families.
 

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Ignoring gm-VOLT forum bias the only key difference between the two is the ability to do long distance travel (which depends on infrastructure). My wife will not be on board with BEV without charging stations as ubiquitous as gas stations. This being said she has no problem and encourages my upcoming purchase of a Volt. My normal driving consists of 89% of trips under 35 miles, 6% with under 200 miles and 5% about 300 miles. The 16 days a year I will need to drive past the vehicles range or Recharge mid trip would cause an inconvenience to me (hopefully less then 30 mins per trip).

200 miles is the minimum for myself and I believe will be a popular option (at the right price) If Charging infrastructure were better (especially in rural areas) I would feel confident in a 200+ mile EV or if full charge in about 20 mins were an option on major highway routes every 20 miles or so.

I vote EREV until infrastructure is improved.
 

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My wife will not be on board with BEV without charging stations as ubiquitous as gas stations. I vote EREV until infrastructure is improved.
Since it takes about a half hour for a fast charger to charge an EV vs. about 5 minutes to gas up a car, I would argue that we'll need about 6 times as many fast chargers as we need gas pumps.

My rough calculations are that a gas pump can "charge" a Chevy Volt (or any gas powered car) at about a 1 MW rate. That's REALLY hard to beat from a speed of charging point of view.
 

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A 200 mile BEV would be a great local car, but I would not want to count on it for out of state travel at this point.

I really like knowing that my Volt is all electric for routine driving, but can still be driven on out of state trips with no range anxiety or special planning required. It just makes the car more versatile and useful for me. I also have a good option in the event of a major electrical outage, which we get occasionally where I live due to hurricane or ice storm. It would be hard to give that up even for a long range BEV.

For a family with multiple cars, there is no reason you can't have one of each.
 

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Since it takes about a half hour for a fast charger to charge an EV vs. about 5 minutes to gas up a car, I would argue that we'll need about 6 times as many fast chargers as we need gas pumps.

My rough calculations are that a gas pump can "charge" a Chevy Volt (or any gas powered car) at about a 1 MW rate. That's REALLY hard to beat from a speed of charging point of view.
We won't need to replace all of the gas station capacity with public charging capacity because most EVs will charge at home overnight and rarely use public charging.
 

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For the vast majority of users, a BEV is a second (or third) car. An EREV can be your only car.
 

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Another consideration is where you live. People who live in apartment buildings usually have less control over their access to charging while they are at home. This would make owning a pure BEV more difficult.

I would only own a BEV if I had more than one car and lived in a single family home. Neither of those things were true for me in my younger single days, so an EREV or PHEV would have been necessary then, IMO.
 

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All-electric vehicles will need at least a range of 300 miles before they can compete with the long-distance range of a hybrid plug-in. If the dedicated use is short commuting, then an all-electric vehicle is fine. If the use is comprehensive transportation, then the hybrid plug-in with range-extender generator such as the Volt is the only rational decision.
 

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Since it takes about a half hour for a fast charger to charge an EV vs. about 5 minutes to gas up a car, I would argue that we'll need about 6 times as many fast chargers as we need gas pumps.

My rough calculations are that a gas pump can "charge" a Chevy Volt (or any gas powered car) at about a 1 MW rate. That's REALLY hard to beat from a speed of charging point of view.
NO.

Something like 15% of miles are on 1% of trips, those 70+ miles one way. And even then, the majority of _those_ longer trips aren't _extremely_ long, with frequency declining with length.
And then there's destination charging and overnight hotel charging.

So, either you have EREV, in which case you can simply reduce pumps more than 80%, or if you have long-range and long-distance BEV which refuels at 1/6 the speed, but needs on-the-road refueling for less than 1/6 of total miles, then you'll need no more OTR plugs than gas pump nozzles. Combine the two and you'll reduce pump nozzles even more and not need that many plugs. But even if you do need plugs, it's _much_ easier to add them than add gas nozzles.
 

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Another consideration is where you live. People who live in apartment buildings usually have less control over their access to charging while they are at home. This would make owning a pure BEV more difficult.

I would only own a BEV if I had more than one car and lived in a single family home. Neither of those things were true for me in my younger single days, so an EREV or PHEV would have been necessary then, IMO.
... for now. If plug-in electric vehicles succeed it'll become easy. There are _no_ technological barriers to home charging.
 

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I am still in the EREV camp.

Long range BEV's will be better than the sub-100 mile BEV's now, but the still lack the freedom of an EREV. This will be this way for many years..

Public charging availability will continue to be limited for many years. Long trips are still a risky adventure at best, even in a Tesla.

High speed charging is improving, but still a far cry from the speed it takes to refuel using gasoline.

For the foreseeable future, I will be more than satisfied with 80%-90% of my miles being electric and having the freedom to drive anywhere I want without worrying about charging issues.
 

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Does the 200+ mile battery EV provide better value to the user, make better use of the energy infrastructure and is friendlier to the environment than an extended range EV like the Volt? Here's an interesting study on these issues.

"The 2016 Chevrolet Volt with an electric range of 53 miles[2] is the first commercial car that almost qualifies as a PHEVLER.

PHEVLERs[3] are a disruptive technology that will help revolutionize both the clean transportation and the clean stationary energy sectors of our economy. These vehicles are the green machines that will provide a critical part of the renewable and sustainable society that we need for the future.[4] 2016 Chevrolet Volt with an electric range of 53 miles[2] is the first commercial car that almost qualifies as a PHEVLER."


http://www.greencarcongress.com/2016/04/20160422-phevler.html
PHEVLER: A new and more complicated acronym for those who refuse to use EREV...
 

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In my neck of the woods, I don't expect a lot of charging infrastructure for the foreseeable future, so I'll stick with PHEV.
 

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For the record, I would have no problem stopping to recharge for 20-30 minutes every 200-300 miles on a long trip in a BEV if there were amenities nearby like a highway rest stop or a restaurant. I tend to stop almost that much anyway in a gas car.
 

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Whether it's BEV or EREV, its mostly a personal decision. As stated by others, a BEV will likely be a 2nd or 3rd vehicle and used primarily for local travel.

I think the article focuses more on the relationship between the PHEVLER (60+ mile EREV) and the grid.

Let's look at this website for ISO New England, the entity responsible for reliable power supply in New England.

http://www.iso-ne.com/

Note that this morning at about 3 am, the power demand was only 9 GW. By early evening it's projected to peak at 15 GW! Then as the night continues, demand will wane until we come back to 9 GW tomorrow at 3 am.

So throughout the day, power plants are being started, loaded up to meet demand, and then throttled back, and then shut down. Add in the complication of backing up wind power, and even more modulation is needed.

By incentivizing PHEVLER charging during night time hours, the peaks and valleys in the power generation demand can be levelized. If there is excess wind power during the am hours, smart chargers at the workplace charge your PHEVLER to avoid shutting down a natural gas combined cycle plant, and then asking it to restart several hours later. More nuclear power plants, which prefer to operate continuously at full power to maximize their core life, can be put into service as there will be more base load.

When there are system problems, such as downed transmission lines or power plants that trip offline, the smart grid can stop all PHEVLER charging and save power for more critical service, as the PHEVLER can always divert to liquid fuel if necessary. In addition, a PHEVLER can actually return power to the grid, as its battery energy is not critical to its operation.

In summary, I think the article focuses on the relationship between electric vehicles and the grid, and that the PHEVLER can help level the demand on the grid, not cause undue peak demands, and relinquish demand when necessary. These factors will help to make the grid more reliable and also allow for more integration of renewable power sources.
 

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For the record, I would have no problem stopping to recharge for 20-30 minutes every 200-300 miles on a long trip in a BEV if there were amenities nearby like a highway rest stop or a restaurant. I tend to stop almost that much anyway in a gas car.
While I can totally relate to that position sometimes, on long trips with the family (wife, myself, two daughters), like 600-800+ miles, we tend to pack lunches and only stop to go potty a few times. We tend to make great time as long as traffic will allow ;)
 

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When the future "self-driving" version of the Volt runs low on fuel on a trip, will it head to a gas station or a recharging station? Will Oregon and New Jersey still have no self-service gas stations, making those two states the only places where the self-driving Volt can refuel away from home without requiring the passenger to perform the task? Will "plug-less" public recharging stations be commonplace by then?
 

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PHEVLER: A new and more complicated acronym for those who refuse to use EREV...
"About the authors

... Dr. Frank is Professor"

That's what all that time and effort spent getting a PhD does for you. :p
 

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Most of the time I'm within the Volt's range or can adapt my plans to fit the Volt's battery with very little effort.
however
I do have family 400 miles North and 350 miles South, ageing parents in both cases, so the times I've needed to "go" I can't mess around, I have to get there. If I owned a pure EV with a 200 or even 300 mile range I'd still have to rent an ICE or something because time would be a serious concern.

For that reason the PHEV is still the ideal vehicle for me at this time in my life.
 
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