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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm currently in the market for a Gen2 and would like to get some advice on what to check for when looking the vehicle over. With the fairly high prices on even high mileage Volts, I really need to take every precaution I can to make sure I don't buy a clunker.

I've read about the shift-to-park issues. If a Volt has had this issue repaired is it likely to come back? If it's out of warranty is it an expensive fix?
 

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I'm currently in the market for a Gen2 and would like to get some advice on what to check for when looking the vehicle over. With the fairly high prices on even high mileage Volts, I really need to take every precaution I can to make sure I don't buy a clunker.

I've read about the shift-to-park issues. If a Volt has had this issue repaired is it likely to come back? If it's out of warranty is it an expensive fix?
I think the shift to park is an easy fix and not that pricey,

I recently bought a 2017 gen2, one thing to keep in mind is that they come with a 3 year/ 36k bumper-to-bumper, 5 year/60k powertrain warranty and Voltec warranty for 8 years/100k. might be more in Carb states" but don't quote me on that" On a different note, if you can find a certified pre-owned, you might be in a better spot and have more peace of mind.

I always try to get my vehicles with some sort of factory warranty on them for my peace of mind.

For testing, do the normal car testing stuff, then test it in both electric and hold mode to make sure there are no issues with switching over. Some might recommend test driving it on an empty battery and get the battery readings but that gets more complicated for the average user.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the reply. Most of the Gen2 with ACC that im finding are approaching 100k miles unfortunately. Volts do seem quite reliable but I would hate to have a serious problem for this much money. Is there any advice for finding one with low mileage at a reasonable price in this market?

For testing, do the normal car testing stuff, then test it in both electric and hold mode to make sure there are no issues with switching over. Some might recommend test driving it on an empty battery and get the battery readings but that gets more complicated for the average user.
Thank you! I'm actually quite comfortable doing this. I already own an OBD2 dongle, I was just reading about the apps which can show battery state. I'm happy that these are available for diagnostics.
 

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I own a 2011 (just since June 2021), so I cannot relate any specifics based on firsthand knowledge. However, take some time to read up on a bunch of Gen2 problem forum posts, and you will get a sense of the more frequent issues. Based on my exposure to this forum, I would be slightly concerned that a BECM issue may be a worry based on the number of posts (especially appears to be an issue for 2017s?) If you are buying it from the current owner, ask them for details on any issues that have been fixed. If you are buying it from a dealer, ask them for a complete service/recall printout.

Since you are comfortable using the OBD, ask them to have it partially charged, and then take it for a drive until the engine switchover occurs so you can look at the cell voltages. Also, try to bring a more conventional OBD reader that will report pending codes as well as the number of drive cycles since the check engine light has been reset. You may also want to comeback for a second test drive timed to coincide with the charge cycle finishing. (I guess you could make this happen with one really long test drive, but in a Gen 2 that may take over an hour to fully deplete the battery).

As previously stated, if you can get one with a factory (or possibly manufacturer certified), that would allay some concerns. Just be sure it covers all the black magic parts (i.e. voltec system/battery)
 

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I purchased my 2017 Premier in late 2019 not knowing the future car pricing endemic. Out of curiosity, I sometimes check the current prices of the volt and am amazed seeing the asking prices of 2017 volts without the options I have and with high miles in comparison to mine. So, I really understand your concern! If you MUST buy, I recommend that you purchase a Certified volt, as mentioned by Mike. I have had two unscheduled maintenance issues that were covered simply due to the fact that I had some additional warranty with my purchase. Next, be certain that the dealership that you purchase from has "volt certified" mechanics as they will be the only ones permitted to service your car. Believe it or not, not all dealerships sold enough volts to keep certified mechanics in their shops. If your does not, expect possible lengthy delays when bringing the car in for maintenance. Don't forget to read the dealership reviews as good service in close proximity to your residence is a real plus. Further, get a list of the number of times that the car has been serviced during its lifetime. I was comfortable knowing that my purchase had only been serviced 5 times--none of which was out of the ordinary. That meant that the car was not experiencing an abnormal amount of malfunctions. I hope this helps. Good luck with your purchase. The volt is a really great car!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I was completely unaware of this BECM issue, thanks for bringing it to my attention. I don't see a recall for it, so I assume it has to fail for them to cover it. And if it fails out of warranty, SOL. Any idea of the out-of-pocket cost for this job?

I really appreciate all the great advice I've received here. I've been trying to wait the market out since April and I don't think it's changing in the next 5 months so I just need to accept paying "too much". I'm not finding any Certified volts under 20k with ACC. Great advice about Volt mechanics and I will call around, even if I buy private. I really hate the idea of gambling on private party now, but it may be my only option. It's been a rough time to need to buy but I don't think I can holdout any longer.

Happy to take in any general advice as well and thanks to everyone again
 

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The only things people keep talking about over and over for problems are:

  • EGR failure
  • BECM failure

I have a 2017 Premier I have had just over a year now and I love this car. I got it with 36k miles now I am at like 50k. We have taken it on long road trips, around town is great, I love it. Knock on wood I don't have any major issues with the car. When I bought mine I didn't know a whole lot about the Volt and mine was from California the dealer bought at auction or something but it is a CPO so that helped with the warranty stuff. I don't know if there is a lifetime electric/gas on the dash but on the onstar app you can see it. Mine had lifetime MPG of 41 when I got it and spent a lot of its life driving on gas so I am hoping that the first owner already went through the EGR stuff.

Depending on the year there are a couple changes, the early 17's have the same infotainment system as the 16's and don't have the app store. The later ones change things up, if you get early make sure it has the update to Android Auto because doing it later will cost you money. You can check in the settings if it says CarPlay and Android Auto you are good there.

The default Michelin Eco tires suck like really suck so if it still has them probably prepare to be buying new tires. Some people say the 2nd generation of the tires are better, the ones I had if it was misting at all it was like driving on glass.
 

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In my area, there are plenty of Volts that are under 50k miles, but they go very fast. A local dealer had about 12 gen 2's for sale, and all but one had sold in one week. You have to check daily, and be ready to go look/test drive. It's no fun, especially if you work full time and have other obligations, but competition amongst buyers is nuts right now. If you already have some dealers in mind, you can tell them what you're looking for, and to call you should what you're after come in, and they will gladly do so if they believe you are a serious buyer. They will also have a pretty good idea as to what lease returns are coming up as well, so that's another avenue.
 

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I'm currently in the market for a Gen2 and would like to get some advice on what to check for when looking the vehicle over. With the fairly high prices on even high mileage Volts, I really need to take every precaution I can to make sure I don't buy a clunker.

I've read about the shift-to-park issues. If a Volt has had this issue repaired is it likely to come back? If it's out of warranty is it an expensive fix?
Would stay away from vehicle unless still under warranty AND your local Chevy dealer has an expert volt technician on staff. I have three dealers in my area, none have volt experience. Like vehicle just won’t buy from GM again. My 2012 has battery heater issue and the ‘repair’ is to replace battery or sell me a new vehicle.
 

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Would stay away from vehicle unless still under warranty AND your local Chevy dealer has an expert volt technician on staff. I have three dealers in my area, none have volt experience. Like vehicle just won’t buy from GM again. My 2012 has battery heater issue and the ‘repair’ is to replace battery or sell me a new vehicle.
I know what you mean. My Trane AC needed some servicing and a local heating and A/C company botched it up. So I won't buy a Trane again. It's their fault some 3rd party I hired did a bad job... /s

Kidding aside, yes a bad dealer can make a good car bad. But I blame the dealer.
 

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I'm currently in the market for a Gen2 and would like to get some advice on what to check for when looking the vehicle over. With the fairly high prices on even high mileage Volts, I really need to take every precaution I can to make sure I don't buy a clunker.

I've read about the shift-to-park issues. If a Volt has had this issue repaired is it likely to come back? If it's out of warranty is it an expensive fix?
I have a 2019 that is coming off lease in October and I’m not going to buy it. If it’s possible I would sell it to somebody it will have probably about 40,000 miles and it has had the shift to park done
 

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My advice is to keep in touch with Devoclub and make an offer. My 2017 premier has had 2 recalls and one "loss of Propulsion" issue--that at the 60,000 mileage mark. Even so, I plan to keep my car because I believe it is well made and will last (breakdown free) for many many years. The 19 has some advantages that the prior models don't have. I wish I were still in the market to purchase. If I was, I'd be taking my own advice. Remember, you will have the warranties to lean on. My only concern is that I wonder if GM will continue to spend $ training Volt technicians for future support to those of us fortunate enough to own these cars.
 
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