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I believe its been 6 years now since the first Volt came into service. Now years later does any other car out there have the similar characteristics as the Volt?

Our 2016 Volt will go just on 100% electric 45 miles (winter) to 60 miles plus (summer). The gas engine will never kick in when you floor it like some other plug in's when driving in pure electric.

The gas engine, when the battery is depleted, still delivers well over 40 mpg, our 2016 with nearly 15,000 miles has been averaging 47+ mpg, on good ole reg. 87 octane gas.

So what other car out there has the same characteristics as the Volt?
 

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I believe its been 6 years now since the first Volt came into service. Now years later does any other car out there have the similar characteristics as the Volt?

Our 2016 Volt will go just on 100% electric 45 miles (winter) to 60 miles plus (summer). The gas engine will never kick in when you floor it like some other plug in's when driving in pure electric.

The gas engine, when the battery is depleted, still delivers well over 40 mpg, our 2016 with nearly 15,000 miles has been averaging 47+ mpg, on good reg. 87 octane gas.

So what other car out there has the same characteristics as the Volt?
Are you kidding me. Every red blooded American knows that the Prius Prime is the best as it gets the best gas mileage.













LOL ;)
 

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The only other PHEV that I can think that works just as well as the Volt is the Prius Prime. When comparing the two. The Volt is great for in-town traveling since it has over twice the EV range. The Prius Prime is great for long trips since it has better REX efficiency and more cargo area.
 

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The new Honda PHEV (just announced) is about a match to the gen1.5 volt, with 42mi EV and 42MPG.

The 2017 prius prime still doesn't come close to matching a 2011 volt and the 2018 Honda Clarity PHEV only just exceeds it.

I think that says a lot about how ahead of its time the volt was, and that other manufacturers now see it as a viable product type to even bother trying to match it.
 

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None....especially in its price range. That's why I now own a brand new Chev.

The last brand new Chev my family bought was my Dad's '65 Bel Air.

GM would be wise to take note if they want to retain further sales.
 

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The Prius Prime this year is everybody's "pick" but it is so UGLY looking. I just can't get over the wasp/insect look of the thing. I've seen a few on the roads and even the color pallet of the vehicle is a turn off for me. Maybe the styling will get better. That's the one thing I like about the VOLT. It looks somewhat futuristic without being over the top. In my opinion the GEN 1's still look just as stylish as today. Also - the Prius Prime is all new, and although it offers great performance, leg room, etc etc blah blah, I never buy a year 1 car. I did it once, and it was just short of being a lemon. 72 RECALLS! on my focus.
 

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The new Honda Clarity PHEV available late this year is the Volt' s first competitor as pointed out already. It isn't for sure, but GM and Honda entered a partnership for hybrid tech, so there is a pretty good chance it is Volt DNA anyway.
 

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I believe the upcoming Ioniq from Hyundai is probably the first real close competition the Volt will see.

But even still the PHEV variant only gets 27 miles of EV range... about half of the Gen 2 Volt.
 

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The only other PHEV that I can think that works just as well as the Volt is the Prius Prime. When comparing the two. The Volt is great for in-town traveling since it has over twice the EV range. The Prius Prime is great for long trips since it has better REX efficiency and more cargo area.
That's why we have one of each.
 

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So far as I can tell, the Volt and i3 REx are in a unique class. They have full rated HP in BEV mode.

All PHEVs I've driven so far, or read about, require the ICE to be running to achieve the advertised HP and acceleration.

Whether the Hyundai or Honda need to run the ICE to get full performance? Dunno yet.

The Prius Prime absolutely has to run the ICE unless 12.x seconds to 60 mph blows wind up your skirt. It's one of the better PHEVs, but the 2017 Volt is far more powerful at all speeds, and the i3 even has more punch than the Volt.

However, besides the i3 REx being over $15,000 more than a Volt, the Range Extender is a joke. It's a two cylinder motorcycle engine with 34hp vs the Volt's direct injection i4 with 101HP.
 

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Prius Prime is competitive with the Volt. Less power and smaller battery pack in the Prius, but better fuel economy for long trips. For commuting, Volt is the best choice. For long-distance travel, the Prius is superior. Two Teslas are plugged into my neighborhood charging station, so I am not getting any electricity tonight without staying up late to charge for a half-gallon equivalent of gasoline. Inconvenience may exceed rewards for a plug-in depending on circumstances.
 

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Everything has pretty well been said on this thread Except....having owned two Prius before the Volt I can tell you that the hwy. handling of the Volt and the solid ride especially on long road trips is far superior in the Volt.
 

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So far as I can tell, the Volt and i3 REx are in a unique class. They have full rated HP in BEV mode.

All PHEVs I've driven so far, or read about, require the ICE to be running to achieve the advertised HP and acceleration.

Whether the Hyundai or Honda need to run the ICE to get full performance? Dunno yet.

The Prius Prime absolutely has to run the ICE unless 12.x seconds to 60 mph blows wind up your skirt. It's one of the better PHEVs, but the 2017 Volt is far more powerful at all speeds, and the i3 even has more punch than the Volt.

However, besides the i3 REx being over $15,000 more than a Volt, the Range Extender is a joke. It's a two cylinder motorcycle engine with 34hp vs the Volt's direct injection i4 with 101HP.
Actually agree with this...However, there have been some crazy $10K off sales price and super low leases on the i3...

But as we'll soon see, range isn't everything, its inevitable the Prime will surpass the Volt in sales and its quite possible it can be this month...
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)




My wife and I took a trip from home to the Long Beach Washington Peninsula , Ocean Park. Weather 55 degrees sunny, nice for a change.
Not bad for a car with both of us in it weighs 4,000 lbs. Mostly moderate speeds to a high of 60 mph, and flat terrain, highest elevation from sea level from where we live is about 150 feet, over the Megler Bridge in Astoria Oregon.

This was a roundtrip, it would probably be even higher in the summer with warmer weather and summer formulated gasoline.

2016 Volt Premier/ 87 octane Costco Gasoline / 10% ethanol blend
 

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Another close analogue to the Volt's operating characteristics is the Chrysler Pacifica minivan. It has a similar sized battery pack, with the much larger vehicle results in 33 miles of EV range, operates like the Volt in depleting the battery before the v6 ice comes on. The V6 does drive the wheels from time to time but is also set up as a range extender. It has a higher rated internal charger and recharges much faster: in 2 hours on level 2.


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Ford Fusion?
 

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After driving two Priuses for ten years and 140K I find it hard to compare them to my Volt unless Toyota is building MUCH better cars today than in 2004 and 2007. I've been driving exclusively in "Hold Mode" for ten days since the FMM kicked in, trying to burn the full tank the dealer put in nine months ago. So far I've gone from an estimated fuel range of 434 to 199 today, so it's gonna take some time. I don't know what mileage the Prius Prime gets running on gas, but my mileage for the last ten days according to the
Energy Used Report is 64.7. However, some how, I've managed to expend 1.8 KwH's [about 11 miles] even in Hold, so the actual mileage is slightly lower.
 

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The Volt is still in a class by itself, it's the only true extended range electric car available. The Prius Prime is just a hybrid, 25 miles of electric range gets you to the grocery store and back and no more, that's just a tease. The i3Rex is just a short range electric with a limp home feature, it's not a road car. BMW's decision to put in a 2 gallon tank instead of a 9 gallon tank like the Volt's was a finger in the eye to drivers, it was done solely to please California regulators. I've done numerous 3-400 mile trips in my Volt and even on the longest I've gotten home with a couple of gallons left in the tank, you could never do that in an i3REX without stopping at every exit to fill up.

That said I really hope that the 2019 Volt at least doubles it's electric range and ups the charger to 7.2KW instead of the current 3.6. Although the 53 mile EV range is much better than any other PHEV available today it's really not adequate. A range of > 100 miles would make it a true EV for local driving purposes and the increase in the charger capacity to full Level II rates would make destination charging much more useful. For example we went to Portsmouth NH yesterday for several hours. There was free destination charging there but it was only able to add 35 miles (on the guess-o-meter) during the three hours we were there. I ended up driving on the ICE for a total of 50 miles during the round trip, a hundred mile battery range and full level II charging would have allowed me to do the entire trip on battery. Note that there are no BEVs available that could handle all of my driving, not even a Tesla. I wouldn't have dared do my short trip to Portsmouth in a Leaf because there is no way of knowing if the destination chargers would be available when I arrived, with the Volt I don't need a guarantee, if they are available that's great and if not so what. The Bolt could have made that trip easily but I couldn't go to Portland ME without a guarantee of a charger at my destination and I couldn't do any of my Vermont trips because there are no CCS chargers and no destination chargers at any of the places I go. Even a Tesla, which has the only fast charging network available. couldn't go everywhere I regularly go. Vermont would be doable because even though they only have 3 supercharger stations there they are all in the right places, it's not as good as the Volt which can do those trips with no stops at gas stations, but it's not unreasonable. I couldn't do my Maine trips, except to Portland because there is a Supercharger in Seabrook NH where you could top off if you needed to, because they only have two superchargers in the state and they are in the wrong places, there is no coverage on a seacoast route. For the next few years the Volt is the only fully practical electric car but I wish it were better.
 

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The Volt is still in a class by itself, it's the only true extended range electric car available. The Prius Prime is just a hybrid, 25 miles of electric range gets you to the grocery store and back and no more, that's just a tease. The i3Rex is just a short range electric with a limp home feature, it's not a road car. BMW's decision to put in a 2 gallon tank instead of a 9 gallon tank like the Volt's was a finger in the eye to drivers, it was done solely to please California regulators. I've done numerous 3-400 mile trips in my Volt and even on the longest I've gotten home with a couple of gallons left in the tank, you could never do that in an i3REX without stopping at every exit to fill up.

That said I really hope that the 2019 Volt at least doubles it's electric range and ups the charger to 7.2KW instead of the current 3.6
I believe since GM is pushing Volt (and Bolt) forward into car sharing (Maven) and ride sharing (Lyft drivers can "rent" Volts in select markets) GM will up the charging speed...Yet even at 7.2KW on a 240v (often public L2 are 208v) its still about two hours for a 0-100% charge, DCFC makes far more sense and also provides tremendous benefits...First to sell the Bolt, dealers have to pay for a DCFC charger so dealers would welcome another vehicle that can use their expensive charger...Then there's extra dealer benefits such as quickly charging after a test drive or to help the service dept quickly diagnosis a battery issue...Lastly while not a huge market it could swing some apt dwellers who cannot charge at home or work to add the Volt to their shopping list who could get away with a weekly DCFC charge...

However, with Volt and Bolt projected sales, it would appear the tax credit cap and sunset will be 100% exhausted by year end 2019 so they really need to focus on cost cutting as even 100 mile range Volt for the Bolt EVs $37,500 MSRP will be a tough sell without the tax credit...
 

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Another annoying difference with the Prime compared to the Volt, When you press the DEFROST button the Prime's engine powers up.
The Prime has a Heat Pump system now, so you get cabin heat in mild temps.
But DEFROST requires heat and de-humidification at the same time. A heat pump system can't do that.

And I'm pretty sure it doesn't track engine usage.
You will be changing engine oil at 10k miles, regardless how many miles the engine was running.
 
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