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Weather,moderate driving habits,no heat/air conditioning if possible-all ensure adequate "guess o meter" miles!
My 2017 LT-Big Island Hawaii-max was 86 due speed limit 50 where I usually drive.Use regen (L)/steering wheel paddle
for downhills-control speed and provide recharge.
 

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Highest I've seen on my GOM has been 63, however that's also using the a/c. Now that it's finally cool enough to stop using the a/c it'll be interesting to see if it goes a little higher.
 

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I was wondering how high the all-electric range estimate can go. I have a 2018 LT, and driving around town it's not unusual to average around 5 miles/kWh. With 14 kWh usable, I figured 70+ mile estimates were possible, and the other day it finally hit 70 for me. I did a quick look for old posts but didn't find much. What's the highest you've gotten?

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Mine is a 2018 and I also have gotten just over 70 miles, in fact 72 miles on the range while driving in town, using paddle regen, with outside temps in the 70 degree range and no air conditioning. I would bet I could get 80 miles at a steady 30-35 miles per hour, but have never seen that.
 

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It runs on regular gasoline and, with a full tank and full charge, Volt has a total range of up to 420 miles.
I just did a Sacramento CA to Los Angeles CA road trip, 417 miles each way. Went 75mph on the way up and had to fill up (was in a hurry). Went 60-65mph on the way home and drafted reasonably when possible. Used mountain mode for each direction on the Grapevine. Made it easily past 420 mile range on the way home.

-Charlie
 

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I was wondering how high the all-electric range estimate can go. I have a 2018 LT, and driving around town it's not unusual to average around 5 miles/kWh. With 14 kWh usable, I figured 70+ mile estimates were possible, and the other day it finally hit 70 for me. I did a quick look for old posts but didn't find much. What's the highest you've gotten?

View attachment 173268
72, Summer, Midwest-USA
 

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Slow, constant speed driving. I've gotten as much as 68 miles on a single charge with careful driving in LA traffic (and that includes AC use!). Say, 40-45mph driving on country roads would get you up to those numbers. Speed limit on the freeway? Expect 50 miles or less.

-Charlie
Are you saying I should slow down? is this with using gas and EV combined? How does it calculate this?
 

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Are you saying I should slow down? is this with using gas and EV combined? How does it calculate this?
The guess-o-meter range is just a rolling average of the recent electric performance that you have achieved. Remaining gas range is similar, but based on how you have done recently in 'hybrid' mode.

If you want higher electric range, you have to slow down - there is no way around it. It is up to you whether the increased range is worth it to you.

-Charlie
 

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Are you saying I should slow down? is this with using gas and EV combined? How does it calculate this?
Try this: when you unplug from the wall and start driving, bring up the energy usage display on the center console screen. See how many electric miles you have driven when the fuel counter reaches 1.0 kWh Used, and then when it reaches 2.0 kWh Used. If you can get 4 ev miles from that first kWh used, that mileage rate will get you 56 electric miles if your full charge gives you 14.0 kWh Used. If you can get closer to 5 electric miles on that first kWh used, or 10 electric miles on the first 2 kWh used, you’re on your way to a 70 ev miles per full charge drive (you ARE getting ~14.0 kWh Used from a full charge, right?).

I find that seeing how far I can drive on that first kWh of the day helps me understand how my driving habits and how the terrain and weather impact my "ev mileage," and thus my full charge range.

This also gives me a "benchmark" over time. When I drive from home to my usual grocery store (at a slightly lower elevation), I almost always use 0.6 kWh to drive the 3.9 miles to that store. A couple of years ago I put a new set of tires on the car... and that number crept up to 0.7 and 0.8 kWh Used to drive to that store, demonstrating the impact of the new tires... and after enough wear and tear was put on those tires, the number returned to the 0.6 kWh Used to drive to that store.
 

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Try this: when you unplug from the wall and start driving, bring up the energy usage display on the center console screen. See how many electric miles you have driven when the fuel counter reaches 1.0 kWh Used, and then when it reaches 2.0 kWh Used. If you can get 4 ev miles from that first kWh used, that mileage rate will get you 56 electric miles if your full charge gives you 14.0 kWh Used. If you can get closer to 5 electric miles on that first kWh used, or 10 electric miles on the first 2 kWh used, you’re on your way to a 70 ev miles per full charge drive (you ARE getting ~14.0 kWh Used from a full charge, right?).

I find that seeing how far I can drive on that first kWh of the day helps me understand how my driving habits and how the terrain and weather impact my "ev mileage," and thus my full charge range.

This also gives me a "benchmark" over time. When I drive from home to my usual grocery store (at a slightly lower elevation), I almost always use 0.6 kWh to drive the 3.9 miles to that store. A couple of years ago I put a new set of tires on the car... and that number crept up to 0.7 and 0.8 kWh Used to drive to that store, demonstrating the impact of the new tires... and after enough wear and tear was put on those tires, the number returned to the 0.6 kWh Used to drive to that store.
This screen?
Vehicle Gadget Communication Device Personal luxury car Vehicle audio
 

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Yes. Think of it as a Trip C meter. Fully recharging the battery resets it to zero miles/zero fuel used.

Then glance at it as you drive those first distances of the day. Can you drive at least 3 electric miles before the display reads 1 kWh Used? Or 4? During that first portion of the trip, are you driving to a slightly lower elevation? Higher elevation? Stop and go traffic, or cruising smoothly for a while? Low or high speed driving?

This picture shows you averaging only 2.5 electric miles per kWh for the first 5 kWh used. That’s below window sticker ratings of 3.8 mi/kWh, and at that rate (70.3 MPGe) you would only get 35 electric miles out of a full charge... so were you blasting the air conditioning even though you say earlier your San Jose area temperatures are in the 70s (heat, a/c uses battery power, too)?

Your trip gas mileage when using gas was 40 mpg, about 95% of window sticker ratings. Such driving habits should carry over into electric driving, and 50 miles per charge (14.0 kWh) is ~95% of window sticker ratings. Of course, window sticker ratings don’t including use of battery power for cabin climate control. Blasting the heat or air conditioning will reduce ev range.

Don’t know why you prefer to drive your Volt as a gas hybrid car instead of as an electric car. Your Lifetime MPGe, 41.4, is about where it would be if you rarely, if ever, drove in Electric Mode. On the pictured trip, you drove 90 miles, yet used less than half of the battery’s full charge. Lots of Hold Mode use suggests lots of highway and freeway driving, suggesting large portions of the daily driving are being done at higher speeds, which lowers the fuel mileage numbers. Slowing down a bit or taking alternative routes might help boost the mileage.
 

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Yes. Think of it as a Trip C meter. Fully recharging the battery resets it to zero miles/zero fuel used.

Then glance at it as you drive those first distances of the day. Can you drive at least 3 electric miles before the display reads 1 kWh Used? Or 4? During that first portion of the trip, are you driving to a slightly lower elevation? Higher elevation? Stop and go traffic, or cruising smoothly for a while? Low or high speed driving?

This picture shows you averaging only 2.5 electric miles per kWh for the first 5 kWh used. That’s below window sticker ratings of 3.8 mi/kWh, and at that rate (70.3 MPGe) you would only get 35 electric miles out of a full charge... so were you blasting the air conditioning even though you say earlier your San Jose area temperatures are in the 70s (heat, a/c uses battery power, too)?

Your trip gas mileage when using gas was 40 mpg, about 95% of window sticker ratings. Such driving habits should carry over into electric driving, and 50 miles per charge (14.0 kWh) is ~95% of window sticker ratings. Of course, window sticker ratings don’t including use of battery power for cabin climate control. Blasting the heat or air conditioning will reduce ev range.

Don’t know why you prefer to drive your Volt as a gas hybrid car instead of as an electric car. Your Lifetime MPGe, 41.4, is about where it would be if you rarely, if ever, drove in Electric Mode. On the pictured trip, you drove 90 miles, yet used less than half of the battery’s full charge. Lots of Hold Mode use suggests lots of highway and freeway driving, suggesting large portions of the daily driving are being done at higher speeds, which lowers the fuel mileage numbers. Slowing down a bit or taking alternative routes might help boost the mileage.
This is all new to me so i greatly appreciate the information. No, i do not "blast" anything, i specifically got "cloth" interior because black leather is cold and hot, my cloth (my car sits outside my office) does not attract as much temperature!
So are you saying i should drive more on electric? I do travel to work, when i hit freeways (which is most of my driving, to work, and to visit my family) I change to gas, as I was told, electric is better fit for "around town" driving?
 

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So are you saying i should drive more on electric? I do travel to work, when i hit freeways (which is most of my driving, to work, and to visit my family) I change to gas, as I was told, electric is better fit for "around town" driving?
Efficiency at freeway speeds is relatively better in gas mode than electric mode - but not absolutely more efficient. The ideal (highest efficiency) speed for the electric drivetrain is lower than the gas drivetrain, but the electric drivetrain is almost always more efficient in total.

So, if you are going to drive 100 miles between times you can charge, use your gas miles at high speed and electric at low speed - but make sure you use all your electric by the time you park to charge again.

Based on my own rough calculations, (my electric rate and fuel costs), my electric cost is about the equivalent to 70mpg on gas. Your fuel and electric prices will vary from mine, so you'll need to do your own calculations... (you know kWh used and miles travelled and cost per kWh from your electric company, and you know your MPG and gas cost per gallon - use both to calculate your cost per mile travelled in each mode) Higher fuel costs (hello California!) and lower electric costs (yay solar panels!) will tip the scales.

In my own personal commute of 75 miles round trip, I get 55-60 miles of electric miles. I choose the 15-20 miles that use gas for to be the high-speed sections and make sure I have battery power available for the slow traffic filled sections. But I still make sure to arrive home with 0 battery miles left, no matter what.

-Charlie
 

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This is all new to me so i greatly appreciate the information. No, i do not "blast" anything, i specifically got "cloth" interior because black leather is cold and hot, my cloth (my car sits outside my office) does not attract as much temperature!
So are you saying i should drive more on electric? I do travel to work, when i hit freeways (which is most of my driving, to work, and to visit my family) I change to gas, as I was told, electric is better fit for "around town" driving?
Most Volt drivers, I suspect, would prefer to drive on battery power all the time, with the instant torque of electric propulsion, etc. Problem is, the electric fuel tank holds only a gallon or two’s worth of driving distance, and it takes so long to refill the tank... so some of those who normally drive beyond battery range like to "save" the fuel for slow speed driving by using Hold Mode. You should get better ev mileage at slower speeds (more bang for the buck when you use battery power at slower speeds), and the "quietness" of electric driving is most beneficial at the same slower speeds ("why, I can actually hear the birds in the trees singing as I drive down this country lane!"). Note that the Gen 2 Volt round trip distance achievement record of 114.0 ev miles on a single charge in my earlier #6 post was accomplished by driving at ~25 mpg.

I’ve been driving my 2012 Volt for 9+ years now. The 2011/2012 Volts had no Hold Mode, but my retired life limits my driving needs around home to less than a full charge’s worth of distance most days, so I rarely use gas (except for those 500+ mile long road trips in late summer) and have no real need to "save" battery power for later by using Hold Mode. I live in the mild climate of Portland, Oregon, and tend to drive around with the window down and my elbow on the sill, so I rarely turn on the heat or air conditioning.

When to use the battery charge is a personal choice. If you’re driving beyond battery range, sure, you can use Hold Mode to save some power for use at the end of the drive or for the better electric mileage you get when using that fuel at a slower speed. Some do it because they prefer the quietness of electric propulsion on the local streets, so they save it for the end of the trip. Others realize that when driving beyond battery power, the total distance will consist of X electric miles and Y gas miles, and there’s a limit to how many electric miles you can squeeze out of one full charge by creative use of Hold Mode. Does it really matter if that 100 mile drive consists of 55 ev miles and 45 gas miles or 50 ev miles and 50 gas miles?

Also keep in mind that many Gen 2 Volt drivers who post pictures of high start of day, full charge ev range estimates may actually have a daily commute of far fewer miles. Their "slow speed short commute" provides them with ev mileage that translates into large full charge range estimates. If they really could regularly drive 70-80 electric miles on a full charge, shouldn’t they have pictures of the energy usage display screen results to prove it? The Gen 1 Volt driver’s displays had an upper limit on the ev range estimate (50 miles for 2011/2012 Volts, 60 for 2013-2015 Volts). Claims of greater ev ranges could be documented only by pictures of actual achievement, not by GOM guesses.
 

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And keep in mind that every kwh you arrive home with is ~0.07-0.1 gallons of gas burned that you didn't have to. Miles from wall power are almost always cheaper than gasoline miles, outside of Texas in February.
 

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Most Volt drivers, I suspect, would prefer to drive on battery power all the time, with the instant torque of electric propulsion, etc. Problem is, the electric fuel tank holds only a gallon or two’s worth of driving distance, and it takes so long to refill the tank... so some of those who normally drive beyond battery range like to "save" the fuel for slow speed driving by using Hold Mode. You should get better ev mileage at slower speeds (more bang for the buck when you use battery power at slower speeds), and the "quietness" of electric driving is most beneficial at the same slower speeds ("why, I can actually hear the birds in the trees singing as I drive down this country lane!"). Note that the Gen 2 Volt round trip distance achievement record of 114.0 ev miles on a single charge in my earlier #6 post was accomplished by driving at ~25 mpg.

I’ve been driving my 2012 Volt for 9+ years now. The 2011/2012 Volts had no Hold Mode, but my retired life limits my driving needs around home to less than a full charge’s worth of distance most days, so I rarely use gas (except for those 500+ mile long road trips in late summer) and have no real need to "save" battery power for later by using Hold Mode. I live in the mild climate of Portland, Oregon, and tend to drive around with the window down and my elbow on the sill, so I rarely turn on the heat or air conditioning.

When to use the battery charge is a personal choice. If you’re driving beyond battery range, sure, you can use Hold Mode to save some power for use at the end of the drive or for the better electric mileage you get when using that fuel at a slower speed. Some do it because they prefer the quietness of electric propulsion on the local streets, so they save it for the end of the trip. Others realize that when driving beyond battery power, the total distance will consist of X electric miles and Y gas miles, and there’s a limit to how many electric miles you can squeeze out of one full charge by creative use of Hold Mode. Does it really matter if that 100 mile drive consists of 55 ev miles and 45 gas miles or 50 ev miles and 50 gas miles?

Also keep in mind that many Gen 2 Volt drivers who post pictures of high start of day, full charge ev range estimates may actually have a daily commute of far fewer miles. Their "slow speed short commute" provides them with ev mileage that translates into large full charge range estimates. If they really could regularly drive 70-80 electric miles on a full charge, shouldn’t they have pictures of the energy usage display screen results to prove it? The Gen 1 Volt driver’s displays had an upper limit on the ev range estimate (50 miles for 2011/2012 Volts, 60 for 2013-2015 Volts). Claims of greater ev ranges could be documented only by pictures of actual achievement, not by GOM guesses.
Whoa, I am learning alot from this post, thank you so much and how this entire EV thing works with the Volt. I got my volt because of the fuel efficiency and EV. I hope I can go 150k miles in my 2018 Volt, currently im sitting on 30k miles, as I have had my car since May of this year, so I go about 10k miles annually. How many miles do you have on your Gen1?

I hope Chevy stops the BOLT and revives the VOLT! Bolt have their problems, but i would say the Volt also is more sporty looking and bigger trunk space. I had thought they stopped making it due to the cost?
 

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I hope Chevy stops the BOLT and revives the VOLT! Bolt have their problems, but i would say the Volt also is more sporty looking and bigger trunk space. I had thought they stopped making it due to the cost?
Never say never, but the Volt is done. Truck and SUV Ev's are GM's focus.
 
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