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What kind of mpg would I get if I had exhausted my batteries and I was running just on the gas generator ?

Also, would I feel a significant power loss when using just the gas generator?
 

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Typically 45 mpg give or tale a couple when driving a steady 70 mph. A little less in the city, which is why it's always a good idea to save some of your battery power for stop and go city use

No, the car performs essentially the same running on gas or electricity. It never allows the battery to get near full depletion, so when running on gas and it needs more power, it will still use battery power for short bursts when it needs to. You're really never relegated to 100% gasoline only power

Don
 

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mettam: Where do you live (it helps to put your location in your signature). MPG in any vehicle depends largely on the terrain.

2014 ELR, driving from Tulsa (where I purchased the car) to Ft. Worth, I averaged right at 38mpg. As for power, I'm not sure about the Gen I Volt, but with the 2014 ELR, the ONLY time you get both elec and gas combined (in D or L) is when the battery is fully depleted, or when driving in "Hold".
 

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I achieved 44 MPG running at 75 MPH on the way to and from Colorado Springs from Denver as well as from Colorado Springs to Cripple Creek and back. The latter being an uphill climb (from about 6,000 feet to about 9,500). For the trip to Cripple Creek I used the ICE the entire way. On the return trip I didn't use the ICE until Monument Hill.

Performance with the ICE was just as it was on the battery (though I did use Mountani Mode in preparation for Monument Hill). Aside from some light engine noise neither I nor my passenger would have been aware it was operating on the ICE.

This one trip is my only data point for ICE operation (save for EMM) as all my other driving has been 100% electric.
 

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I make a 156 mile commute and I'm averaging 42-43 mpg driving on very flat freeways doing 67-68 mph. I can get about 42 miles of battery, and then I'm on gas. In all, I use 2.7-2.9 gals on the commute
Keep in mind that this question was asked in the Gen 2 forum and the above numbers are (evidently) for a Gen 1 car . . . .

Don
 

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Nearly 50,000 miles now on our 2016 Volt Premier, my wife's car. Nearly 17,000 of that just on the gas engine.
My daily driver is a 2010 Prius. I just filled the Prius and the mpg, calculated (miles divided by gas used) was 50.2 mpg; The computer read 54 MPG.

Our Volt last fill up, 141.1 miles on gas ( two trips that gas was used after battery ran out) gas pumped,regular 87 octane, 2.665 gal's calculated to 52.94 mpg. (Note: voltstats.net mpg just on gas (cs) is nearly 49 mpg lifetime).

Cost per mile, now that gas is nearing $3.30 / gal (87 reg. octane), and electric (all costs, taxes sur charges etc is $.113 / KWH), the Volt cost far less to operate than the Prius.
 

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2017 Volt LT:

38 to 40 MPG when running 70 to 75 MPH
45 to 48 MPG when running 65 MPH
50 to 55 MPG when running 55 MPH
55 to 60 MPG when running 45 to 50 MPH

I see these numbers consistently at the listed speeds. Mountains and hills don't impact these figures either due to regenerative braking.
 

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2017 Volt LT:

38 to 40 MPG when running 70 to 75 MPH
45 to 48 MPG when running 65 MPH
50 to 55 MPG when running 55 MPH
55 to 60 MPG when running 45 to 50 MPH

I see these numbers consistently at the listed speeds. Mountains and hills don't impact these figures either due to regenerative braking.
I see similar. Mileage really drops over 70mph.

And OP, the car has an engine that connects directly to the wheels. It is not a generator. This car is a plug in hybrid with some fancy marketing on top.
 

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...the drag force increases proportional to the square of the speed of the vehicle, hence why going from 55 to 75MPH is not simply arithmetic.
 

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I see similar. Mileage really drops over 70mph.

And OP, the car has an engine that connects directly to the wheels. It is not a generator. This car is a plug in hybrid with some fancy marketing on top.
It was my understanding what separated the Volt from a Hybrid is the electric motor was the only thing which powered the wheels. Do you know where I can learn more about the power train configuration for the Volt?
 

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...the drag force increases proportional to the square of the speed of the vehicle, hence why going from 55 to 75MPH is not simply arithmetic.
And the Horse Power needed for steady speed driving goes up as the cube of the speed.
 

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No, the ICE does power the wheels under many torque situations. It really is a hybrid. Probably best explained in this video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o3-wGOyT2-I
Thermodynamics explains why the ICE drives the vehicle directly when in use. By having the ICE drive the vehicle directly you only lose energy once. Having it drive an electric generator which then drives the vehicle results in two energy loss points.
 

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Just did 809 miles round trip on Volt, 754 miles on gas and burned 19.7 gallons of gas, outside temp was 80F, AC was on. Average speed on engine was 75 mph. Average fuel economy 38.3 mpg - very impressive for the speed of 75mph with AC on.
 

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Just did 809 miles round trip on Volt, 754 miles on gas and burned 19.7 gallons of gas, outside temp was 80F, AC was on. Average speed on engine was 75 mph. Average fuel economy 38.3 mpg - very impressive for the speed of 75mph with AC on.
That's not bad, but nothing to write home about. I've gotten 42 mpg on a non hybrid Altima on a trip that was all above 70mph.
 

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It was my understanding what separated the Volt from a Hybrid is the electric motor was the only thing which powered the wheels. Do you know where I can learn more about the power train configuration for the Volt?
It’s the Gen 1 Volt that operates as an electric car on generator output when in Hold Mode or the battery is depleted. As I understand it, the Gen 1 is capable of full performance using only the single large motor. The smaller motor is clutched to the drivetrain under certain driving conditions to improve efficiency.

When in single motor configuration for Extended Range Mode driving (e.g., when in stop and go driving, when accelerating quickly), the Gen 1 Volt is an all-electric car running entirely on gas-generated electricity. GM calls this "electric like" driving. When cruising down the road (>35+ mpg), the generator motor may be clutched to the drivetrain (split-power configuration), which allows engine torque to flow through the generator to the wheels, increasing overall efficiency, reducing the generator’s fuel consumption rate, and thus improving the "gas" mileage.

The Gen 2 Volt, with two planetary gears, operates much more like a "gas hybrid" vehicle when operating on gas than does the Gen 1 Volt.
 

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I would say a more realistic MPG range when running using the ICE is in the 38-43 MPG range depending on speed, terrain, trip length, etc... When I usually drive on long highway stretches going *ahem* slightly above posted speeds, I will typically see around 39 MPG. Driving at the posted speed limit will often yield a little higher (e.g. ~42 MPG).

While it may be lower than a true hybrid, the fact that many people (myself included) drive the majority of the time using only electric, the fuel consumption vs. savings numbers make a lot more sense.
 

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I've only gone through about 9 gal of gas in my 2018, but so far it seems to average right around 42-44 mpg. This is a mix of higher speed (~70-75 mph) highway, and also some ~40-50 mph local roads/highways. It actually seems to do better at slightly higher speeds(~60-75 mph) since it's probably getting into a better gear ratio than down in the ~30-50 mph range.


That said, I still get a distinct burning/something getting hot smell of something when running the ICE for more than a few minutes. It almost makes me want to really run the ICE for a solid tank or two just to get rid of that smell, but I really have no need to. I just run it ~10 miles every 1-2 weeks to keep things going. EMM is annoying, so I'd rather run the ICE on my own terms.
 

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I've only gone through about 9 gal of gas in my 2018, but so far it seems to average right around 42-44 mpg. This is a mix of higher speed (~70-75 mph) highway, and also some ~40-50 mph local roads/highways. It actually seems to do better at slightly higher speeds(~60-75 mph) since it's probably getting into a better gear ratio than down in the ~30-50 mph range.


That said, I still get a distinct burning/something getting hot smell of something when running the ICE for more than a few minutes. It almost makes me want to really run the ICE for a solid tank or two just to get rid of that smell, but I really have no need to. I just run it ~10 miles every 1-2 weeks to keep things going. EMM is annoying, so I'd rather run the ICE on my own terms.
Your MPG results are the same as my 2017 Volt. The burning smell should lessen over time. Check your fluid levels, at least once a month, (specifically engine oil, coolant overflow tanks (there are 3) and brake fluid for signs of any leaks.
 

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Here is a trip my wife and I took yesterday down to Tillamook County Oregon via Highway 101. Here is the screen shot when we returned home. MPG"s on gas was not too bad. 2016 Volt Premier...



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