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I just got my new 2017 Volt premier last week. I still can't believe the great price for a fully loaded car, plus the $7500 tax credit, plus 0% financing for 60 months! I'm very pleased with the car and the range is perfect for my daily commute. I started wondering this weekend about the ICE. I could conceivably never use the ICE. My commute is less than 10 miles. I have other cars we use for longer trips and travel.

Should the ICE be run periodically? What about the fuel? Does the fuel go bad after a few years sitting in the tank? Crazy questions for my first electric vehicle.
 

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If you never use the ICE, the car will activate it from time to time to keep it healthy and to burn gas (which might otherwise go bad). There's information on this in the manual, but I don't have an exact page number reference offhand.

If that's your planned use scenario, you might want to keep relatively little gas in the tank so as to minimize the amount of gas that the car will want to burn to keep it fresh.

Note also that the ICE might run periodically for other reasons, such as to help provide heat in cold weather or to provide a little extra power if you're passing at highway speeds.
 

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The GM engineers thought of that, after about 6 weeks (of no ICE use) the car will notify you that an Engine Maintenance Mode (EMM) is necessary. You can select it and it will immediately start the ICE and it will run for about 5 to 7 minutes. In the Gen I it would burn about .03 gallons of gas as it runs all it's checks. You can also DELAY it 24 hours, but you will be forced by the car to do this.

Then after about a year the car will alert you that it's time for a Fuel Maintenance Mode (FMM) to occur, when this happens it will force you to use most of what's in the tank. For this reason some choose to carry only a few gallons of gas. But it's rare for some one not use ANY gas during a year. ERDTT (in cold climates) is usually enough to satisfy these requirements. You can also trick or delay this by adding some fresh fuel. The car is smart enough to take that into consideration.

Don't worry, the Volt will protect you. And all of this is outlined in the Owner's Manual.
 

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I just got my new 2017 Volt premier last week. I still can't believe the great price for a fully loaded car, plus the $7500 tax credit, plus 0% financing for 60 months! I'm very pleased with the car and the range is perfect for my daily commute. I started wondering this weekend about the ICE. I could conceivably never use the ICE. My commute is less than 10 miles. I have other cars we use for longer trips and travel.

Should the ICE be run periodically? What about the fuel? Does the fuel go bad after a few years sitting in the tank? Crazy questions for my first electric vehicle.
The engine will take care of itself, charge on and enjoy the ride :)
 

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When did GM start offering 0% on the 2017 Volt? I bought mine on Aug 20th and had to use traditional financing, Got 1.79% from my military CU so it's not a big deal. But every penny helps.
 

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When did GM start offering 0% on the 2017 Volt? I bought mine on Aug 20th and had to use traditional financing, Got 1.79% from my military CU so it's not a big deal. But every penny helps.
The 0% financing offer may be regional. Or was a Labor Day special.
 

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The car will use gas. Eventually. See above good posts.
 

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When did GM start offering 0% on the 2017 Volt? I bought mine on Aug 20th and had to use traditional financing, Got 1.79% from my military CU so it's not a big deal. But every penny helps.
0 has been available for months in Michigan. You get state tax credit, we get cheap money.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
The 0% financing offer may be regional. Or was a Labor Day special.
Thanks for the quick replies. I must have missed that section in the manual.

The 0% financing may be regional. I'm in Florida.

This financing deal was not advertised. I made my best deal on the car, and when I went to pay cash, the finance manager asked if I wanted to use their 0% financing for 60 months. Free money!
 

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When did GM start offering 0% on the 2017 Volt? I bought mine on Aug 20th and had to use traditional financing, Got 1.79% from my military CU so it's not a big deal. But every penny helps.
I got mine at 0% 8/29 here in Ohio.
 

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We have a 2016 Volt LTZ with now well over 4,000 miles. We use the gas engine quite a bit. My wife has a 32 mile round trip to her business which is easily done in the Volt, with usually 25 electric miles or more still left when she returns home. Living out here in the northwest coast of Oregon to go to Portland Oregon or Longview Washington is a roundtrip of at least 150 miles or more. Not a problem as the gas engine delivers mpg as good, probably better than a new Civic or Corolla, 45 mpg+ is our current average, which is improving all the time it seems. Infact it cost about the same or even less to take our Volt to Portland or Longview instead of our 2010 Prius even when you include the cost of electricity and gas with the Volt.
 

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I recommend looking up EMM (Engine Maintenance Mode), FMM (Fuel Maintenance Mode) and ERDTT (Engine Running Due to Temperature) in the Volt's user manual. Pages 181 and 182 have some info on EMM and FMM.

The owner has very little control on these modes. The Volt (both GEN 1 and Gen 2) uses these modes to ensure that the gas engine is run from time to time (every 6 weeks of non-use/little-use), and that the fuel in the tank does not go stale (average age of fuel is less than one year). ERDTT is a special mode that kicks in at very low temperatures.
 

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I have other cars we use for longer trips and travel.
Why would you deny yourself the pleasure of driving your Volt on longer trips? It is a great road trip car plus it gets 40+ MPG on the highway.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Why would you deny yourself the pleasure of driving your Volt on longer trips? It is a great road trip car plus it gets 40+ MPG on the highway.
Because I have three kids and the lousy rear seat of the Volt is pretty lame. It's my major gripe about the car. For long trips I have a Lexus RH hybrid or our Honda Odyssey depending on luggage requirements.
 

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Because I have three kids and the lousy rear seat of the Volt is pretty lame. It's my major gripe about the car. For long trips I have a Lexus RH hybrid or our Honda Odyssey depending on luggage requirements.
You knew this before you got the Volt, right?
 

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You knew this before you got the Volt, right?
Of course. I bought this car as my daily commuter vehicle. I am merely responding to the question about why I won't take the volt on longer trips.

I did look in the back seat before I bought the car. The Gen2 volt rear seat is marginally better than the Gen1 IMHO.
 

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Of course. I bought this car as my daily commuter vehicle. I am merely responding to the question about why I won't take the volt on longer trips.

I did look in the back seat before I bought the car. The Gen2 volt rear seat is marginally better than the Gen1 IMHO.
The rear seat is cramped.....almost any compact car will have a cramped rear seat. But I've found that 3 (small, 10 and under) kids can be driven around in the rear of my '17 with no complaints from them. We're talking 200+ round-trip trips.
 

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You ask, "What if I never use gas?" The EMM, FMM, and ERDTT sections of the manual clarify that the Volt is engineered to self-maintain the condition of the ICE, even if rarely or never used.

The other part of the answer is that using gas in a Volt is a personal decision, but a reassuring option. The Volt’s all electric range is said to meet the daily driving needs of a large percent of users, but not every day is a "daily driving" day. For one member of this forum, it is. He hasn’t used gas to propel his 2012 Volt for many years, choosing to maximize his enjoyment of the Volt as an electric car by efficient driving and utilizing charging opportunities when away from home. I myself rarely drive far enough to approach my 2012 Volt’s battery range - perhaps once a month or less - but having gas in the tank means never cutting my driving short on those once-a-month days out of worry the drive will be too far for the fuel I have in the car... even when I get an invitation to visit a friend on the coast, where the round trip is 140 miles with no sure recharging when I get there... or for that 5,000+ mile round trip I’m about to take to attend a 55th high school reunion... The day will come when your destination will be "just for the two of you," and that will be the day you can arrive driving an electric car.
 
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