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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know more and more cars are not coming with a spare tire. But I wanted to know what everyone here does in the real world when they get flat tires on their Volt? Do you have to get towed to a dealer to get the flat replaced or repaired?
 

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Depends on whether the flat is pluggable with the sealant that comes with the car (or a plug kit you may carry). If not, you need either a tow or you supply your own spare. The link in the previous post explains more.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The link has a lot of good ideas. If only someone would make a briefcase type of accessory (containing a jack, lug-nut wrench and spare tire) that we could put into back of the car for roadtrips. Thank you for the information.
 

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2 things I did. After getting two flats from the OEM tires, and yes, towing galore -$2,000 in damages one time from this. I bought the thicker Goodyear Comfortreds as replacements to the OEMs. They have meat and heft on the tires and are excellent in snow, rain, and dry weather. I also bought a refurb Volt wheel and put a spare in the trunk. Finished.
 

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The link has a lot of good ideas. If only someone would make a briefcase type of accessory (containing a jack, lug-nut wrench and spare tire) that we could put into back of the car for roadtrips. Thank you for the information.
My jack and lug wrench fit nicely in the space for the first aid kit and reflective triangle under the trunk floor. Along with a plug kit and pliers. I did have to put a bit of foam padding around it so that it wouldn't rattle around though. The spare tire is not so easy to hide.
 

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That is what I'm doing. I just received an used original wheel, I'm getting an used tire from craiglist, and I already have a GM type jack. All will go within a tire tote strapped to the hooks for when my wife drives it to Florida to see her mother and I'm working abroad.

Although I think she can change a tire, all she really has to do is call OnStar and get the tire changed.
 

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I have run flats on my Stingray and love them. Since the Volt is my wife's car I'll probably be replacing the OEM GY's with run-flats.
 

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When you ride a motorcycle for transportation, as I have for over 50 years, you learn to live without a spare. GM is on the right track not wasting precious interior space and adding unnecessary weight with a spare wheel.

On motorcycle, it is necessary to carry a plug kit and an inflation device. The inflation device is most important. Most tire punctures are caused by construction nails and screws. This type of missile almost always partially seals the hole it makes as it goes in. Air will still slowly escape, maybe 5 or 10 lbs a day, easily enough to detect if you check your tire pressures every day, and keep a close eyeball on your tires. If you get a puncture away from home or service facility, you simply add air as you go. Until you get to tire shop, where the tire is replaced and you go on your way. GM provides a seal device combined with an inflation device that runs off the car's electric.

Personally, if the hole is well sealed by the puncturing agent I would not use the sealer spunk, but rather just the inflation device, to get me get to a repair place, without unnecessarily messing up the inside of my wheel with that sticky stuff.

If the nail/screw hole is letting air escape so fast that you can actually HEAR it come out, hissss, then you need the seal spunk, too. In that case I usually will use a pliers to pull out the offending spear and install a sticky string type of plug. Inflate to pressure and then head direct to tire store to replace tire. I never continue to use a tire that has been punctured. The idea of a roadside repair is to get you home without a tow.
 

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Most tire punctures are caused by construction nails and screws. This type of missile almost always partially seals the hole it makes as it goes in. Air will still slowly escape, maybe 5 or 10 lbs a day, easily enough to detect if you check your tire pressures every day, and keep a close eyeball on your tires. If you get a puncture away from home or service facility, you simply add air as you go. Until you get to tire shop, where the tire is replaced and you go on your way.
This might be true for "normal" tires, however, the Goodyears on the Volt are very thin in the side wall and the tread. I have had two blowouts with inch long slits. One in the tread and the second in the sidewall of its replacement with less than 1000 miles on it. And I am very careful to never curb these tires. There was no obvious reason for either of these blowouts.
 

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Wow, blowouts are scary! When these two blowouts happened, were you driving the car at the time?
Yes. The first one, thru the tread, was on a residential road at <30 mph. The second one was at interstate speed. Both were the left rear tire, but the car handled well and was very stable to drive to the next exit and the side of the road.
 

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I have been carrying either a donut spare or a full size spare and jack for 3 years of Volt ownership and have not had any tire failures. I am sure the first day i leave the spare in the garage I get a flat.
 

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This might be true for "normal" tires, however, the Goodyears on the Volt are very thin in the side wall and the tread. I have had two blowouts with inch long slits. One in the tread and the second in the sidewall of its replacement with less than 1000 miles on it. And I am very careful to never curb these tires. There was no obvious reason for either of these blowouts.
Wasn't there a batch of tires that had a manufacturing defect in the side wall that caused cracks? Someone even posted pictures showing the cracks. IIANM, these tires were covered under warranty.
 

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I have been carrying either a donut spare or a full size spare and jack for 3 years of Volt ownership and have not had any tire failures. I am sure the first day i leave the spare in the garage I get a flat.
Superstitious! This is actually a big reason I rotate my own wheels. Frequent close up eyeball examination of every square inch of tread and sidewall go a long way to catching these defects before they cause roadside trouble. Especially the inside sidewall that is hard to see. Since I got anal about my tires while riding motorcycles, I have had a few punctures but I caught every one of them either at home before I left, or during inspection while getting gas. A spare, besides using up all the cargo space and adding a bunch of dirty stinking rubber to the inside of the cabin, has to be installed, maybe on the roadside, which is an exquisitely dangerous place to try to jack up a car. Spare tires are relics of the past: when tires weren't as good, flats a lot more common, cars stood a lot taller, and traffic on the roads was much lighter.

Now having wrote all that I realize I must be about to have an embarrassing flat tire experience...
 

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