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Discussion Starter #1
is it feasible to incorporate a 2016 battery pack into my 2013.when programming the battery,does it require the vin.Just spit balling here.I have a friend at the dealership who would help me,,but I don't want to brick the car.
thoughts
 

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My Thoughts

The only 2016 battery I would put in my 2013 is a 12V.

With all the battery management software involved, I don't know about "bricking" it, but I doubt you will achieve any additional range you are probably seeking.
 

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The chance is non-zero (it should be possible), but it's not a high chance, and it's going to take a lot of hacking, I would guess.
There are a lot of controls built into the software that you'll need to get around or trick into thinking everything is ok.

It would be a fun pet project if you got a cheap used volt at auction and wanted to tinker.

Besides that, you will still only be able to use 65% of the battery, because that's what the gen1 computer is going by.
So your improvement is going to be quite small for the effort - about 12kWh vs 10.5kWh or 15%.
 

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I would imagine the sarcophagus is different between the two, so your first hurdle would be trying to fit the new batteries. Sounds like a lot of trouble.
 

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I would imagine the sarcophagus is different between the two, so your first hurdle would be trying to fit the new batteries. Sounds like a lot of trouble.
And money. It's not a like-for-like exchange. All for very little actual gain in capacity.
 

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Well I suppose with enough money, time, programming and equipment anything is possible.

The Gen II battery is 9L larger than the Gen I and it is dimensionally different. It simply just doesn't fit. Just because they are both T shaped doesn't mean they are interchangeable.

They also have different connectors, and a different number of cells with different battery management computers.

It's not simple.
 

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It would actually be simpler to reprogram the gen 1 to allow a larger charge window than to move all the gen I bms, contactors, etc to a gen ii battery for install
 

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The project would be fraught with undocumented/proprietary technical details, necessitating plenty of reverse engineering on your part. Unless you're absolutely in LOVE with formidable technical challenges, this conversion has to be more trouble than it's worth.
 

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It would be far cheaper to trade your car in on a new 2017.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
It would actually be simpler to reprogram the gen 1 to allow a larger charge window than to move all the gen I bms, contactors, etc to a gen ii battery for install
that would be a great solution.I'd love to have 20kWh total,so adding a few cells elsewhere in the bottom of the car.
 

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The battery electrifical voltage and power specs appear to be really close, I would think a gen2 battery would work with a gen1 propulsion system. There isnt enough information on the physical interface specs to decide but the physical size is close, and no info on the cooling requirements. Also no details on compatibility of modules connecting to the battery. Bottom line, don't expect your dealer to offer a gen1 to gen2 battery upgrade anytime soon.
 

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I suspect you'll need to do some reprogramming. I don't think gen1's PCM firmware will know how to address and balance the extra cell groups in a gen2 battery.

Volt service manual said:
To maintain a similar state of charge on the cell groups, the hybrid/EV powertrain control module 2 looks at the cell group voltages and determines which cell groups need
energy removed in order to maintain the battery groups at a similar state of charge. This is known as cell balancing. There is a resistor wired in parallel with the cell group and
a transistor switch in series with the resistor internal to the drive motor battery high-voltage interface control module. The hybrid/EV powertrain control module 2 sends a
command to the battery energy control module to begin cell balancing through the drive motor battery high-voltage interface control modules
 

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I suspect you'll need to do some reprogramming. I don't think gen1's PCM firmware will know how to address and balance the extra cell groups in a gen2 battery.
Oops. I see gen2 will have fewer cell groups than gen1. However, I still think gen1 PCM firmware will have difficulty addressing and balancing given the cell-group discrepancy - and may throw DTCs when it attempts to address the missing cell groups.
 

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From a technical standpoint I'm pretty sure it is doable.

It won't be easy - after getting the pack to physically fit and improvising structure to hold it together that's crashworthy, your next challenge will be getting to coolant and high voltage DC connectors to line up or making adapters for them. Don't forget the high voltage interlock circuit that has to be connected together and is designed to physically block access to the high voltage.

Now comes the other hard part. You need to connect the data channels/canbus together and convince the generation two battery to talk to the generation one car controllers (especially HPCM2) correctly. Maybe the use exactly the same requests and responses, maybe they don't. Right now I don't think anyone outside GM knows.

So yes, I have no doubt it could be done. But unless you have thousands of cars to spread the cost over or nothing else you want to get done this year, I don't think it is practical.
 

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Oops. I see gen2 will have fewer cell groups than gen1. However, I still think gen1 PCM firmware will have difficulty addressing and balancing given the cell-group discrepancy - and may throw DTCs when it attempts to address the missing cell groups.
Unless I'm very confused, there are exactly the same 96 groups in both cars. The first generation has three cells in parallel in each series group, the second has only two in parallel - but with the same 96 groups that shouldn't matter.

Pretty sure the controller that handles all that is located in the battery housing anyway and would thus be a second generation controller (which will need to be persuaded to work with the first generation controllers on the rest of the car.)
 

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Unless I'm very confused, there are exactly the same 96 groups in both cars. The first generation has three cells in parallel in each series group, the second has only two in parallel - but with the same 96 groups that shouldn't matter.
Thanks. I think you got that right.

Pretty sure the controller that handles all that is located in the battery housing anyway and would thus be a second generation controller (which will need to be persuaded to work with the first generation controllers on the rest of the car.)
The repair manual quoted above describes HPCM2 as orchestrating cell balancing. That module is located under the front passenger seat.
 

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The repair manual quoted above describes HPCM2 as orchestrating cell balancing. That module is located under the front passenger seat.
Interesting. I would have assumed that was a BICM function - it and the four BECMs (or do I have that backwards again?) are the only ones with direct access to the cells and the only things able to measure individual group voltage.
 
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