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Discussion Starter #1
I feel like this is a potential owner FAQ, but I didn't see it in the FAQ. I also googled, but couldn't get the right terminology to find the result I'm looking for. Sorry if this has been covered before.

I'm shopping for a used Volt and I'd like to know if there's a way for me to determine how many of a Volt's total odometer miles are due to the combustion engine (vs how many miles are electric).

For example, consider the case of two Volts with 25000 miles and all other things being equal. Volt A was charged often and 75% of its miles are all-electric. Volt B was rarely charged and only 25% of its miles are all-electric. Since the Volt warranty covers the battery and electric motor for a greater time/duration than the gas engine, I would buy Volt A because it has less wear-and-tear on its combustion engine.

So I'm wondering if there's a way for me to find this information; hopefully there's some screen on the center stack, deep in the menu system.

thanks,

!!Dean
 

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Don’t think the Volt itself will show you the gas/electric miles breakdown, but here’s a quick and dirty method of evaluating two Volts:
Center display shows "Lifetime MPG" at bottom right side of usage display. If this number is lower than 250+:

Lifetime MPG = total gas + total electric miles/total gas used
or
Total gas used = odometer reading/Lifetime MPG

Pick a reasonable sounding lifetime MPGcs (mileage when using gas) for a Volt, such as 40 MPGcs

Total gas used x lifetime MPGcs = total gas miles

If both cars had similar MPGcs during their previous life, this method shows which car has more gas miles, thus fewer electric miles. Unfortunately, the Volt’s Lifetime MPG displays max out at "250+."
 

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I would just look at the lifetime MPG. If its around 200 mpg they likely drove 90% electric. 100 mpg, maybe 75% electric.... The high electric mileage 4 year old Volt's aren't really showing any degradation anyway...
 

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OK, seems to me that GM really missed an opportunity here. They design a car that can run much of its life on the battery system, and very little (or at least much reduced) life running on the ICE. To show confidence in there EV components they provide an relatively expansive warranty, then put a pretty lame warranty on the ICE system that has been under development for nearly a century. Really?

VIN # B0985
 

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The on star app shows lifetime ev miles. So just subtract that number from the total on the odometer. You won't have access to the on star app but you can call on star from the car. The vehicle records ev miles So you should be able to find out. Try taking the vehicle to a dealer to have it inspected, dealer should be able to pull the data as well. Easiest method is on star app, then call on star directly, or try dealer.
 

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Switch to metric units using the controls to the left of the steering wheel and press the leaf on the dash until you on the consumption page. This will show the lifetime fuel consumption in liters / 100 km. You can calculate mpg from this and it won't truncate like US fuel economy does at 250 mpg. This will let you calculate total gallons burned, multiply that by 35 mpg or so to get estimate of gas miles.
 

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Switch to metric units using the controls to the left of the steering wheel and press the leaf on the dash until you on the consumption page. This will show the lifetime fuel consumption in liters / 100 km. You can calculate mpg from this and it won't truncate like US fuel economy does at 250 mpg. This will let you calculate total gallons burned, multiply that by 35 mpg or so to get estimate of gas miles.
This works well. Mine comes out closest if I multiply by 34 mpg
http://calculator-converter.com/l_100km_mpg_convert_mpg_to_l_per_100_km.php

Total miles 21,568
.54L/100k = 435MPG
21,568/435=49.58 gallons
49.58g X 34mpg=1,686 gas miles (this is very close to my Onstar numbers)
 

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This works well. Mine comes out closest if I multiply by 34 mpg
http://calculator-converter.com/l_100km_mpg_convert_mpg_to_l_per_100_km.php

Total miles 21,568
.54L/100k = 435MPG
21,568/435=49.58 gallons
49.58g X 34mpg=1,686 gas miles (this is very close to my Onstar numbers)
Learn something new everyday. Thanks for this insight. I'll compare this to my car (Trip A has tracked the car since new and never reset and I registered on VoltStats from day one).

Stand by for results.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
OK, seems to me that GM really missed an opportunity here. They design a car that can run much of its life on the battery system, and very little (or at least much reduced) life running on the ICE. To show confidence in there EV components they provide an relatively expansive warranty, then put a pretty lame warranty on the ICE system that has been under development for nearly a century. Really?
On the one hand, I understand your sentiment.
On the other hand, and considering Tesla's 8 year infinite mile warranty, the fundamental nature of the EV drivetrain is showing its superiority to the multi-moving-part, metal-scraping-metal, explode-heat-and-exhaust drivetrain of an ICE.

!!Dean
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thank you, that is a good rule of thumb.
I'm going to adjust those numbers slightly for myself using voltstats.net

!!Dean
 

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Thanks everybody for the responses.
As an engineer, I particularly like the workaround to use metric to get an accurate number.
This was my first post to this forum and I am especially impressed by the quality responses and lack of trolls & arguments.

The result of this discussion is that in the hunt for my first Volt (used),
I am going to accept more miles on the odometer because they're likely electric (and not combustion) miles.
And in doing so, I'll be able to find a blue one and not settle on another external color to get all the features I'm looking for.

regards,

!!Dean
 

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I am not so sure that a high percentage electric miles makes it a better used car. Even in gasoline mode the Volt engine is charging the battery and mostly driving with the electric motor. Driving all gasoline probably means the battery has been cycled thru a narrow range (40 to 50% SOC). This may not be bad. Both the gas engine and the battery/motor may be good for 200k miles. There are not enough reports yet of those miles to know.
In a used Volt I would be having wheel alignment and front suspension checked. The few Carfax I have seen have pointed in that direction in high mileage Volts.
 

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I feel like this is a potential owner FAQ, but I didn't see it in the FAQ. I also googled, but couldn't get the right terminology to find the result I'm looking for. Sorry if this has been covered before.

I'm shopping for a used Volt and I'd like to know if there's a way for me to determine how many of a Volt's total odometer miles are due to the combustion engine (vs how many miles are electric).

For example, consider the case of two Volts with 25000 miles and all other things being equal. Volt A was charged often and 75% of its miles are all-electric. Volt B was rarely charged and only 25% of its miles are all-electric. Since the Volt warranty covers the battery and electric motor for a greater time/duration than the gas engine, I would buy Volt A because it has less wear-and-tear on its combustion engine.

So I'm wondering if there's a way for me to find this information; hopefully there's some screen on the center stack, deep in the menu system.

thanks,

!!Dean
Using my car as an example:

Total miles divided by lifetime mpg = total gallons used (18155 / 168 = 108)
Gallons used multiplied by 37= miles driven on gas (108 * 37 = 3998)

Using this method gets me within 95% of what it shows on voltstats. Of course, it only works if the lifetime mpg is below 250.
 

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On the one hand, I understand your sentiment.
On the other hand, and considering Tesla's 8 year infinite mile warranty, the fundamental nature of the EV drivetrain is showing its superiority to the multi-moving-part, metal-scraping-metal, explode-heat-and-exhaust drivetrain of an ICE.

!!Dean
My real concern is that ALL miles count against the ICE warranty, even when it is not involved. Doesn't seem to make sense to me. There should be a separate odometer keeping track of engine miles (or hours). Just because the ICE is a component of the car doesn't mean wear is happening.

VIN # B0985
 

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Using this method gets me within 95% of what it shows on voltstats. Of course, it only works if the lifetime mpg is below 250.
The VoltDC app will give you your lifetime MPG number in whole numbers, and voltstats.net will show you the number to two decimal places. Voltstats also lists the lifetime MPGcs. MyVolt.com stops the MPG number at 1000+. Volt owners who use US units can find precise MPG numbers there and don’t need to convert from liters/100 km to discover their lifetime gas used.
 

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The VoltDC app will give you your lifetime MPG number in whole numbers, and voltstats.net will show you the number to two decimal places. Voltstats also lists the lifetime MPGcs. MyVolt.com stops the MPG number at 1000+. Volt owners who use US units can find precise MPG numbers there and don’t need to convert from liters/100 km to discover their lifetime gas used.
If you select "Download Reading Data" on your VoltStats login page, the .CSV file captures to 5 decimal places when the furthest are non-zero.

Data.JPG

Data2.jpg
 

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Switch to metric units using the controls to the left of the steering wheel and press the leaf on the dash until you on the consumption page. This will show the lifetime fuel consumption in liters / 100 km. You can calculate mpg from this and it won't truncate like US fuel economy does at 250 mpg. This will let you calculate total gallons burned, multiply that by 35 mpg or so to get estimate of gas miles.
FYI it still truncates. Just at a different extreme. I see no valid reason why it should, but it does.
I should be reading about 0.18 L/100km lifetime, yet it says 0.00
It gave up around 0.25 IIRC
 

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Thanks to the forum info, I turned the DIC until the trip "A" was showing, and lo and behold, about 40 gallons had been used for 24K miles on my used 2012. I took the safe road and and multiplied it by 35 and figured about 1400 miles had been driven in two years with the ICE. Glad I am not the only one asking this! Of course, several trips have passed since we got the car, and I have used almost another 3 gallons! My available miles on electric now reads a consistent 48 after a full nights charge. So far, that has been fairly accurate, 43 being about the best actual miles before battery is depleted. So far, so good!


Mike
 

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On my MY 2011 -- assuming this is true of other MY as well just don't know -- it shows the total gallons used. You can multiply by 35 to get a pretty good approximation of the gas miles.

On the other hand, and considering Tesla's 8 year infinite mile warranty, the fundamental nature of the EV drivetrain is showing its superiority to the multi-moving-part, metal-scraping-metal, explode-heat-and-exhaust drivetrain of an ICE.
Of course this would miss the point that Tesla was forced to come up with this warranty because its customers were freaking out about how often the drive train was needing a multi-thousand dollar repair. That may have been addressed in more recent copies, but in no case can you say the electric drive train has been superior. In thinking about it, the Nissan Leaf has been even worse if you consider the battery to be part of the drive train.

In truth there are thousands of parts in a car and any one of them can cause a problem. The Model S has a fairly bad repair history. No idea how much of that is related to the drive train. The Volt has probably had more problems the 12v battery and the heater than with anything. Who would have figured?
 
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