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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
During the long power outage in the East I started charging my 1,500 watt portable battery using the DC outlet in the Volt. Does anyone know if you could use all three 12v outlets in the Volt at once to charge back-up batteries?

Also, has someone put a DC to AC inverter in the Volt's 12v outlet and what is the maximum size. I assume only 100 watts? Can you put one in all three 12v outlets? or are they all connected and would be tripped?

Thanks,
MrEnergyCzar
 

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During the long power outage in the East I started charging my 1,500 watt portable battery using the DC outlet in the Volt. Does anyone know if you could use all three 12v outlets in the Volt at once to charge back-up batteries?

Also, has someone put a DC to AC inverter in the Volt's 12v outlet and what is the maximum size. I assume only 100 watts? Can you put one in all three 12v outlets? or are they all connected and would be tripped?

Thanks,
MrEnergyCzar
The "cigarette lighter" receptacle in the front is on one 20A fuse and the other 2 receptacles (center console, rear seating) SHARE another 20A fuse. So you may not be OK to use all three (depending on your charger load) but definately TWO!

As far as using a 12V>120V inveter, you're pretty much safe to use any typical 100-200W accessory inverter that is designed to plug into an automotive 12V cig lighter socket, providing they dont exceed 20A and blow the fuse.

As far as something with more power, there is another thread somewhere that it is discussed the potential to connect an industrial grade inverter to an unused 80A or 100A Mega-fuse located in the rear of the car (on top of the battery connected to the positive post)
With all regular vehicle loads minimized (lights, heater, radio etc OFF) IMO the converter should be able to handle AT LEAST 500 watts and perhaps as much as 1000 watts (as the DC-DC converter is rated to ~2000watts @ 12V ) But one would have to be very wary of "in-rush" surge current levels when devices are switched ON.

So this really isnt really something I could recommend as you'd be risking serious damage to the very expensive converter unit that would NOT be covered under warranty in this case. So be fore-warned
HTH
WOT
 

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Also, has someone put a DC to AC inverter in the Volt's 12v outlet and what is the maximum size. I assume only 100 watts? Can you put one in all three 12v outlets? or are they all connected and would be tripped?

Thanks,
MrEnergyCzar
Search is your friend...

http://gm-volt.com/forum/showthread.php?5949-VOLT-as-auxiliary-power

I'm hardly an expert in the subject. Other threads have said that the APM (Accesory power module - the DC-DC converter in the spare tire well which provides 12V power from the main battery bus) is capable of 175 Amps - or just over 2kW. Obviously, you can't pull that kind of power from a cigarette lighter outlet - I'm told there's a couple open spots in the driver's side hatch area power group that could. (I'm pretty sure there's another thread where the details of that power block are discussed.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The "cigarette lighter" receptacle in the front is on one 20A fuse and the other 2 receptacles (center console, rear seating) SHARE another 20A fuse. So you may not be OK to use all three (depending on your charger load) but definately TWO!

As far as using a 12V>120V inveter, you're pretty much safe to use any typical 100-200W accessory inverter that is designed to plug into an automotive 12V cig lighter socket, providing they dont exceed 20A and blow the fuse.

As far as something with more power, there is another thread somewhere that it is discussed the potential to connect an industrial grade inverter to an unused 80A or 100A Mega-fuse located in the rear of the car (on top of the battery connected to the positive post)
With all regular vehicle loads minimized (lights, heater, radio etc OFF) IMO the converter should be able to handle AT LEAST 500 watts and perhaps as much as 1000 watts (as the DC-DC converter is rated to ~2000watts @ 12V ) But one would have to be very wary of "in-rush" surge current levels when devices are switched ON.

So this really isnt really something I could recommend as you'd be risking serious damage to the very expensive converter unit that would NOT be covered under warranty in this case. So be fore-warned
HTH
WOT
OK, this is what I was looking for. The front one and back two are on separate fuses. Ideally, I'd want a small pure sine wave inverter of 100 - 150 watts made for a car (if they make a pure one for cars) just to be safe that is smaller than 20A max. Should I keep the car "on" with lights and everything off while using the inverters? Does it just use the 12volt battery or the main volt 16KW battery? Does the main 16KW battery back-fill the 12volt regular battery? I assume the car would come on after drawing the Volt's main battery down below 29%?
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OK, this is what I was looking for. The front one and back two are on separate fuses. Ideally, I'd want a small pure sine wave inverter of 100 - 150 watts made for a car (if they make a pure one for cars) just to be safe that is smaller than 20A max. Should I keep the car "on" with lights and everything off while using the inverters? Does it just use the 12volt battery or the main volt 16KW battery? Does the main 16KW battery back-fill the 12volt regular battery? I assume the car would come on after drawing the Volt's main battery down below 29%?
Thanks
To get it to charge the 12 volt battery the car has to be in the on/run state. It should start the ICE if drained the main battery but I suspect that would take a long time in your case.
 

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OK, this is what I was looking for. The front one and back two are on separate fuses. Ideally, I'd want a small pure sine wave inverter of 100 - 150 watts made for a car (if they make a pure one for cars) just to be safe that is smaller than 20A max. Should I keep the car "on" with lights and everything off while using the inverters? Does it just use the 12volt battery or the main volt 16KW battery? Does the main 16KW battery back-fill the 12volt regular battery? I assume the car would come on after drawing the Volt's main battery down below 29%?
Thanks
Yes, providing the car is "ON" (recommend all accessory loads turned OFF as well) it will provide power to the 12V outlets sourced from the Volt's Lithium Ion battery using the DC-DC converter as a "go-between"and 12V AGM battery acts as a stabilizer of sorts.
At ~22% SOC the ICE will come ON and it theoreitically will contiue to generate the required power for as long as it has fuel.
WOT
 

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Don't forget the standard warning: if the engine comes on so that you're using your Volt as a generator, make sure it is parked in a well-ventilated area (i.e. not in a garage) to avoid the possibility of carbon monoxide poisoning.
 

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I've successfully wired and tested a DC-AC inverter hooked to my Volt via the large battery terminals below the hatch. 1000W inverter, seems to work fine and can handle my fridge's load surge on startup without any issues.
 

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To get it to charge the 12 volt battery the car has to be in the on/run state. It should start the ICE if drained the main battery but I suspect that would take a long time in your case.
What about opening the hood in run mode, this will start the ICE, not sure if it will supply power to the outlets however (if your battery is up). Yes, make sure the car is outside.
 

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What about opening the hood in run mode, this will start the ICE, not sure if it will supply power to the outlets however (if your battery is up). Yes, make sure the car is outside.
Kinda confused about the goal of this suggestion. If the car is in run mode, it'll use the engine to hold the traction battery SoC as needed - which I think was the OP's goal. Opening the hood to start the engine seems superfluous (and there's a note in the manual that says the traction battery is neither charged nor discharged by that action.)
 

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You would want the car in on mode. Not just the hood open as the hood open i do not believe charges the battery. It would be better if and when the ICE kicks on you switch the car to MM mode let it build up a buffer then when the ice kicks off switch back to normal and llet the HV battery substain the charge of the 12v system until the ICE kicks on again and then you just repeat the process.
 
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