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There are many issues when a car as new and complex as the Volt stops being manufactured. The main question from a maintenance perspective is: will the Volt's platform continue as an SUV or in some other form in the US?

If not,

1. Will Volt techs be available in 2, 5, or 10 years (especially in areas where few Volts were sold) to fix problems?

2. What is the trade in value of a used G2 Volt - will it fall off a cliff?

3. How will parts be made available? Can people find replacement batteries and other parts in 2, 5, or 10 years?

One wonders if it was a good idea to be an early adopter of this technology when GM does not commit fully to the technology as evidenced by its dropping the G2 model (and the technology?) so soon after its introduction.
 

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There are many issues when a car as new and complex as the Volt stops being manufactured. The main question from a maintenance perspective is: will the Volt's platform continue as an SUV or in some other form in the US?

If not,

1. Will Volt techs be available in 2, 5, or 10 years (especially in areas where few Volts were sold) to fix problems?

2. What is the trade in value of a used G2 Volt - will it fall off a cliff?

3. How will parts be made available? Can people find replacement batteries and other parts in 2, 5, or 10 years?

One wonders if it was a good idea to be an early adopter of this technology when GM does not commit fully to the technology as evidenced by its dropping the G2 model (and the technology?) so soon after its introduction.

1. Most likely not. It is even hard today to find someone who knows complicated problems. But more and more of diagnostics depend on on board computers anyways.

2. It may go up or down, depending on various factors most importantly gas prices and economy. I don't think this will have a big impact on sale price. Besides new GM EVs will be $7500 (+some) more expensive very soon. But if you are specifically asking about trade in, dealers always low balls anyways.

3. Definitely! Manufacturers are required to support cars with parts for a very long time. Part prices may go up but there will be parts 2030 and forward.

I expected 2020 would be the last year when I bought mine in 2017, it came a year earlier. It doesn't make any sense to try to sell this tiny interior car in US market alone. It is a niche product, not an area GM usually focuses on.
 

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Federal law is that parts have to be available to repair a car 8 years after it's last production date. Note, you can have REALLY long delays if current stock runs out before 8 years. I've owned 2 fairly low volume cars that saw the parts phase out start affecting them right at that 8+ year mark, and it's not fun because the usual problem areas tend to be breaking on all the cars out there, so those few "common replacement parts" dry up in a real hurry. Sometimes the aftermarket steps in, sometimes they don't...
 

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Does an extended warranty make more sense now?
I think that decision has no bearing on if GM is still producing the Volt.

IMO, there are going to be some pretty compelling EV/PHEV options on the market in a few years... or every car manufacturer is completely full of BS with their talk of "huge influx of EV models coming!!!"
 

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Does an extended warranty make more sense now?
Probably not. Just because GM is going to stop building the Volt in 2019 doesn't mean they won't be required to maintain an inventory of essential parts for at least 7 years.
 

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This might be a little counter intuitive, but I think the Volt prices could go up some at least in the short term as I am not sure how much the auto manufacturers will be pursuing the the PHEV market and as there is a demand for some of this, there may be a market shortage for the demand. At some point in the future, and I don't know how far exactly before this becomes apparent, pure battery EV's will be the cheapest, simplest, most reliable vehicles. A plug in hybrid will be more of a luxury item which will afford the convenience of a dual fuel source available to the owner. This doesn't really change the usefulness to me or my perceived value of my Volt. There may yet be a GM plug in hybrid that is a cross over or SUV. Perhaps they will call it the CrossVolt? I plan on hanging onto mine for a while and see what the future brings.
 

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This might be a little counter intuitive, but I think the Volt prices could go up some at least in the short term as I am not sure how much the auto manufacturers will be pursuing the the PHEV market and as there is a demand for some of this, there may be a market shortage for the demand. At some point in the future, and I don't know how far exactly before this becomes apparent, pure battery EV's will be the cheapest, simplest, most reliable vehicles. A plug in hybrid will be more of a luxury item which will afford the convenience of a dual fuel source available to the owner. This doesn't really change the usefulness to me or my perceived value of my Volt. There may yet be a GM plug in hybrid that is a cross over or SUV. Perhaps they will call it the CrossVolt? I plan on hanging onto mine for a while and see what the future brings.
agreed; demand and prices will go up. Demand is somewhat softer than usual right now because the Tesla M3 is sucking the air out of the room, but not everyone is ready for the Tesla prices. A used gen2 Volt is a superb alternative at a much lower price so I see used gen2 Volts getting any cheaper for awhile.
 

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My plan

I appreciate the thoughts and commentary on this subject. Our 2019 Premier is due to be built (tpw) the week of 12/17. I've been looking at them for a few months prior and decided it would fit our needs very well.

I wish I considered the Volt in 2012 when we were looking for a car for my wife to use for her short commutes to work 5 days a week. The 2013 Focus that we purchased new with the DCT was a poor choice as the more shifting the trans does, the shorter the life of the BS dual clutches. It's on the 3rd set of replacement clutch packs and seals in 55k miles. The Focus owners that put a majority of highway miles on get longer life out of the clutches and apparently are relatively satisfied with the DCT. :/

I bought a 2005 ford Excursion during their phase out. This was to replace the 2000 m/y with the V-10 that we owned. I wanted to get the diesel engine to tow our trailer. I still have it. It's in great condition with 80,000 miles and gets stored over Winter these days with our trailer. I liken this experience with our soon to be purchased Volt. It will fill a niche and be cared for and maintained for the duration of it's life, just like our Excursion. And what I hoped would have been the case for our Focus. I'm hoping.
 

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What I see is that in 5 years my car may become unrepairable when everyone refuses to service it. Then your vehicle will be a brick and it will be GM's doing at the direct fault of their management. When your car becomes a high-tech brick you should know exactly who to blame. You should know then who inflicted financial damage on you and yours.
 

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What I see is that in 5 years my car may become unrepairable when everyone refuses to service it. Then your vehicle will be a brick and it will be GM's doing at the direct fault of their management. When your car becomes a high-tech brick you should know exactly who to blame. You should know then who inflicted financial damage on you and yours.
I think you would only have yourself to blame. If you bought an expensive, unique, and innovative vehicle in a fast changing market, then you weren't particularly prudent. If you leased it, you wouldn't have a care in the world, because the bank would absorb all the downside risk on the investment.

Financially speaking, when there is relative stability, you want to hold assets for appreciation. When there is instability, you want to hedge and use leverage to your advantage.

Another example would be water front property. Considering the concerns of climate change, would you really want to buy your dream summer house on the Outer Banks, or Miami Beach? Best to spend your money on renting a place there instead.
 

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I think you would only have yourself to blame. If you bought an expensive, unique, and innovative vehicle in a fast changing market, then you weren't particularly prudent. If you leased it, you wouldn't have a care in the world, because the bank would absorb all the downside risk on the investment.

Financially speaking, when there is relative stability, you want to hold assets for appreciation. When there is instability, you want to hedge and use leverage to your advantage.

Another example would be water front property. Considering the concerns of climate change, would you really want to buy your dream summer house on the Outer Banks, or Miami Beach? Best to spend your money on renting a place there instead.
I'd disagree with this. Most lease rates I saw were $2000-$3000 down, $299 a month for a base model. Over three years, you're shelling out $13,000-$14,000 in lease payments, and you walk away at the end of the day with nothing or you purchase the car for the residual, which is almost certainly more when combined with your lease payments, than what you would have paid if you bought the car off the lot.

Compare buying a base LT. They go for about $28,000 before incentives most places outside of California. You get $7,500-$12,000 off in state and Federal rebates, so your out the door price is $18-$21K. Even if the car depreciates down to $10,000 in 3 years (which I'd say is unlikely as Gen 1 Volts still sell for ~$15K with around 40,000 miles, and the main factor depressing used Volt prices was the massive discounts available on new cars, which will obviously no longer be available). You're still only $8-11K out of pocket, not $13K.

Let's say alternatively that you keep it for 8 years, through the end of the robust powertrain warranty, during the period that parts are still readily available. You rack up 90K miles. Let's be pessimistic and say you brick the car completely (unlikely) and get $3000 on a trade-in, which is more the dealer doing you a favor to get you to buy a new car. You paid $15-$18K for 8 years of use versus paying $13K for 3 years.

Add to this that the Volt has been by all measures a very reliable car, and I think buying is a more prudent option.

Comparing cars to real estate in terms of investments is silly. 99% of cars depreciate over time. In contrast, real estate generally appreciates over time.
 

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I'd disagree with this. Most lease rates I saw were $2000-$3000 down, $299 a month for a base model. Over three years, you're shelling out $13,000-$14,000 in lease payments, and you walk away at the end of the day with nothing or you purchase the car for the residual, which is almost certainly more when combined with your lease payments, than what you would have paid if you bought the car off the lot.

Compare buying a base LT. They go for about $28,000 before incentives most places outside of California. You get $7,500-$12,000 off in state and Federal rebates, so your out the door price is $18-$21K. Even if the car depreciates down to $10,000 in 3 years (which I'd say is unlikely as Gen 1 Volts still sell for ~$15K with around 40,000 miles, and the main factor depressing used Volt prices was the massive discounts available on new cars, which will obviously no longer be available). You're still only $8-11K out of pocket, not $13K.

Let's say alternatively that you keep it for 8 years, through the end of the robust powertrain warranty, during the period that parts are still readily available. You rack up 90K miles. Let's be pessimistic and say you brick the car completely (unlikely) and get $3000 on a trade-in, which is more the dealer doing you a favor to get you to buy a new car. You paid $15-$18K for 8 years of use versus paying $13K for 3 years.

Add to this that the Volt has been by all measures a very reliable car, and I think buying is a more prudent option.

Comparing cars to real estate in terms of investments is silly. 99% of cars depreciate over time. In contrast, real estate generally appreciates over time.
I grant you that leasing is more expensive overall. But you've made assumptions that may or may not turn out to be true. That's the risk that leasing transfers to the bank. What's even better is that if the car doesn't depreciate as fast as the lease anticipated, you can extract the upside by buying and selling the car, or having the dealer put the positive equity towards a new one. You get all the upside, with none of the downside.

Agreed that cars and real estate are different animals, but my example was to demonstrate stability vs. risk. Real estate is almost always a good investment, but with climate change you need to make smarter real estate decisions now too.
 

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Yes. An expensive lesson for myself: Never rely on GM for any reason. Ever.
Don't blame GM. All they did was manufacture a product. It's your choice how to invest in it or not. Sometimes we buy junk, sometimes we get lucky. But it's our job as buyers to become well informed consumers, and try to mitigate risk on large purchases. Heck, my current house is way underwater, and it's the first time in many home purchases I've experienced that. I can't blame the builder.
 

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Well 2 days ago I tried to find a 2017 Volt within 250 miles of Reno Sparks using carmax and there were none. I am keeping my 2017 until the wheels fall off and when gas is 5.00 a gallon I will be able to go to the store for my 400 dollar loaf of bread!:p

Tow a volt
 

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you bought an expensive, unique, and innovative vehicle in a fast changing market
Yes, the market was changing fast. But by 2018, the Volt had been around for 7 years - long enough to think that it was no longer novel, and long enough for GM to show that they were committed to producing a very nice gen 2 based on what they learned from the customer response to gen 1. It was not unreasonable to think that GM was committed to the Volt long term.

That said, I'm not terribly surprised.
 

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Well 2 days ago I tried to find a 2017 Volt within 250 miles of Reno Sparks using carmax and there were none. I am keeping my 2017 until the wheels fall off and when gas is 5.00 a gallon I will be able to go to the store for my 400 dollar loaf of bread!:p

Tow a volt
I always thought oil/gas would go through the roof one day, but I'm not so sure anymore:

Oil.JPG
 

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Yes, the market was changing fast. But by 2018, the Volt had been around for 7 years - long enough to think that it was no longer novel, and long enough for GM to show that they were committed to producing a very nice gen 2 based on what they learned from the customer response to gen 1. It was not unreasonable to think that GM was committed to the Volt long term.

That said, I'm not terribly surprised.
My thought was that the Volt was always a technology outlier -- nothing else like it in the marketplace -- and BEVs were already getting traction.
 
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