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Not even a week ago, had to make use of Eric's kit over a weekend using the 2500W pure-sine wave inverter purchased from amazon prime shown above when my house lost both phases of power until Rocky Mountain Power could respond to resolve.



Happy to report my Gen1 with older APM pictured above was able to power all the small electronics I have using this inverter with a 'slightly' higher capacity than the @2000W rating of the legacy APM.;)


Previous 2000W modified-wave inverter I had used in the past was being overloaded/cutting off with the same load.
 

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Not even a week ago, had to make use of Eric's kit over a weekend using the 2500W pure-sine wave inverter purchased from amazon prime shown above when my house lost both phases of power until Rocky Mountain Power could respond to resolve.

Happy to report my Gen1 with older APM pictured above was able to power all the small electronics I have using this inverter with a 'slightly' higher capacity than the @2000W rating of the legacy APM.;)


Previous 2000W modified-wave inverter I had used in the past was being overloaded/cutting off with the same load.
Thanks for this! I have added this inverter to my wish list. Here's the link:

https://www.amazon.com/Reliable-Efficiency-Inverter-Converter-Display/dp/B0154C5F3A
 

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Thanks for this! I have added this inverter to my wish list. Here's the link:

https://www.amazon.com/Reliable-Efficiency-Inverter-Converter-Display/dp/B0154C5F3A
I'm happy with mine. I had it 'cooking' all weekend during my blackout. It is manufactured in China (like 95% of the inverters avail on amazon though).

Even though the APM on the Gen1 seems fairly bulletproof, I would be mindful about how far to exceed the @2kW rating of the APM as I was using this 2500W inverter. Try to keep accessory usage off in the Volt (heater/aircon/ect) since the APM is still supporting this existing load as well. Tacoma's advice back on the 1st page of this thread about adding a 2nd AGM into the circuit to be able to handle surges and put less 'stress' onto the APM would aid in supporting higher power loads,
 

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Discussion Starter #24 (Edited)
Availability Update: Hi all, these are going to have some limited availability continuing through December, 2019

We've had a bunch of people asking for help with the PG&E power outages, and we didn't want to leave people hanging. Please spread the word though, as at this time, it's highly unlikely that these will be available for ordering again after December.
 

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For those asking about the components: to me, the cables appears to be Design Your Own Dual Conductor Custom DC Power Cables from Powerwerx: https://powerwerx.com/dual-conductor-custom-cable

Not sure of the specific specs tho. The connector appears to be a 120 Amp SB Series Anderson Powerpole Connector (SB120)
or 175 Amp SB Series Anderson Powerpole Connector (SB175).
 

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I live in Phoenix and we don't have power outages very often. And when there is one, usually they only last for a couple of hours.

I'm trying to understand what the difference is if I bought my own inverter and open up the trunk floor to get access to the 12V battery and just clamp the connector (that usually comes with the inverter) to the 2 battery terminals, vs using the inverter kit offered here. I guess the advantages I see is that with the kit, it's basically routed to the side panel to help make it much more accessible, so you don't have to open up the trunk floor every time you need access, right?

The other advantage is that the inverter kit seems to come with a very nice fuse holder with fuse. But the actual inverters themselves usually already come with their own fuse as well, don't they? So is the kit's fuse redundant?

Is there anything else that I'm missing? I like the idea of the inverter kit because I see the value in it. However, the price for the kit without an inverter seems a bit prohibitive to me at almost $200 considering that it's basically a bunch of albeit very well made, cut-to-length wires, with very sturdy connectors that's very convenient to use if you want to access it on a regular basis, like maybe for power access if you camp regularly, for example. But for an occasional power outage that doesn't happen very often, is there anything wrong with simply opening up the trunk floor and clamping my own inverter onto the 12V battery posts?
 

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Website still showing "Sold Out" how to order?
 

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https://www.carcarekiosk.com/video/2013_Chevrolet_Volt_1.4L_4_Cyl./battery/jump_start

This web site shows the positive and negative terminals to hook up to an inverter.

I have an inverter with jumper cables attached to it ... I have used it with cars before to power the 1500 W inverter before .. no issues.

The kit being sold would be useful if one routinely uses the car this way .. for once a year or two? I'll just stick with my current setup and connect it as I have been ... via jumper cables connected to the inverter.
 

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https://www.carcarekiosk.com/video/2013_Chevrolet_Volt_1.4L_4_Cyl./battery/jump_start

This web site shows the positive and negative terminals to hook up to an inverter.

I have an inverter with jumper cables attached to it ... I have used it with cars before to power the 1500 W inverter before .. no issues.

The kit being sold would be useful if one routinely uses the car this way .. for once a year or two? I'll just stick with my current setup and connect it as I have been ... via jumper cables connected to the inverter.
Is the physical wiring from the battery in the rear brought up to the front under the hood really enough to handle the kind of current draw a 1500W inverter demands? Or is it just barely enough to bring the voltage of the battery up to the right level to just start the car. If it's the later, then it may not be safe to clamp the inverter to the front of the car terminal like that. After all, the purpose of that post in the front is to jump start only, and I don't think the current demand from the Volt to start itself is that high to begin with.
 

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O/M says that front is for jump starting the Volt only. To jump a car that uses a 12V starter motor you must use the terminals in the back close to (or on) the battery. I'd be willing to bet that jumping another Volt would work from either end without blowing the fuse that feeds the front contact posts.

The one time I needed a jump in a hybrid car AAA showed up with a little jumper battery and it took 30 seconds to get the 12V battery voltage high enough to start the CPU and get the HV battery to crank over the engine.
 

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Discussion Starter #31 (Edited)

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Discussion Starter #32
I live in Phoenix and we don't have power outages very often. And when there is one, usually they only last for a couple of hours.

I'm trying to understand what the difference is if I bought my own inverter and open up the trunk floor to get access to the 12V battery and just clamp the connector (that usually comes with the inverter) to the 2 battery terminals, vs using the inverter kit offered here. I guess the advantages I see is that with the kit, it's basically routed to the side panel to help make it much more accessible, so you don't have to open up the trunk floor every time you need access, right?

The other advantage is that the inverter kit seems to come with a very nice fuse holder with fuse. But the actual inverters themselves usually already come with their own fuse as well, don't they? So is the kit's fuse redundant?

Is there anything else that I'm missing? I like the idea of the inverter kit because I see the value in it. However, the price for the kit without an inverter seems a bit prohibitive to me at almost $200 considering that it's basically a bunch of albeit very well made, cut-to-length wires, with very sturdy connectors that's very convenient to use if you want to access it on a regular basis, like maybe for power access if you camp regularly, for example. But for an occasional power outage that doesn't happen very often, is there anything wrong with simply opening up the trunk floor and clamping my own inverter onto the 12V battery posts?
The main benefits are:
- The kit provides a means to do a very quick connect/disconnect, which can be especially handy when the power's out.
- The kit provides an integrated installation of the battery side cables so you don't need to have the hatch open with battery terminals exposed.
- The wiring here is heavy duty marine grade wiring, which is much better than the standard NEC-rated wiring you'd typically get with an inverter set. It ensures that you can pull power from the Volt for longer durations wtihout needing to worry about the wiring.
- The fuse setup is better for safety as well, than just using a standard clamp setup without a fuse (btw, the clamps may not really be rated for that much continuous power either).

All in all, it's a personal preference. We've sold lots of these kits because people find them very useful, but some amount of personal preference comes into play as well. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #33
Hi all,

Seemingly against all odds, we've found a way to keep these going into 2020. We needed to find an alternate supplier that was able to meet our specifications and also handle some of the assembly. Luckily we're in good shape now. Thanks for everyone's support and kind words, I'm very glad the kit is working out well for so many people, both in the US and abroad.
 

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Is the physical wiring from the battery in the rear brought up to the front under the hood really enough to handle the kind of current draw a 1500W inverter demands? Or is it just barely enough to bring the voltage of the battery up to the right level to just start the car. If it's the later, then it may not be safe to clamp the inverter to the front of the car terminal like that. After all, the purpose of that post in the front is to jump start only, and I don't think the current demand from the Volt to start itself is that high to begin with.
I'll have to double check I guess...
 

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Discussion Starter #35
Is the physical wiring from the battery in the rear brought up to the front under the hood really enough to handle the kind of current draw a 1500W inverter demands? Or is it just barely enough to bring the voltage of the battery up to the right level to just start the car. If it's the later, then it may not be safe to clamp the inverter to the front of the car terminal like that. After all, the purpose of that post in the front is to jump start only, and I don't think the current demand from the Volt to start itself is that high to begin with.
My understanding is that the Volt's under-hood points for jumping are intended for providing just enough power for the Volt to start up if its 12V battery were dead, not what would be required to jump another vehicle. For that kind of current you're supposed to use the battery terminals directly IIRC.
 

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Would you please comment on this post:

HiFlite HiFlite is offline
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'Loose', not 'Lose'.

I've been meaning to do something like this for some time. More, later, but first a very important point:

Do NOT put anything like a ring terminal or washer under the nut for the clamp to the battery for the ground (black) wire! It's labeled (1) in the first picture. That nut is tapered on the bottom and that taper is what tightens the clamp.

The EVExtend instructions, for example, has the user do exactly that, which means the clamp is loose thereafter.


I recently ordered one of your kits but haven't yet done the install...Thanks
 

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First post from a new Volt owner. I have a new to me 2017 Volt Premier.
I see they still have EV Extend kits in stock. My question is which 'pure sine wave inverter' do they ship? I am happy to buy the standard kit, but I think I would prefer to buy an inverter from a local business. (Like HomeDepot or Lowes possibly with extended warranty). That way if I have a warranty issue or a faulty unit a return will be an easy 5 minute drive vs shipping the inverter somewhere and hoping to get it back one day.
I have no doubt the kit itself is well made, I doubt I would have any issues.
Is there any reason to buy the inverter with the kit vs separately locally? Which model inverter ships? Will the wiring kit allow any 1500W/3000 peak inverter to be used?
Example: https://www.lowes.com/pd/Power-Bright-1500-Watt/3125911?

Thank, Dan in Goodyear AZ
 

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Will the wiring kit allow any 1500W/3000 peak inverter to be used?
Example: https://www.lowes.com/pd/Power-Bright-1500-Watt/3125911?
Being a happy owner of an EV Extend kit, I can't imagine anything in the kit that would be incompatible with any inverter. I'm sure Clarkson would be happy to address this as well. However, a couple key points re the particular unit you mention. First, it is not a pure sine wave model and that is a personal preference. Second, the input voltage is limited to a max of 15V, or shutdown will occur. I see you have a Gen2 and perhaps the DC-DC converter on it is different, but some Gen1 (all?) vehicles will show 15V or very slightly more for extended periods of time. I know this to be a problem because the first inverter I purchased would shut down instantly when the input hit 15V. Likewise, my fridge would occasionally trip the breaker when compressor(s) started.

So, my replacement inverter allows for input voltages up to 16V, and I chose a 2000W unit to solve the surge problem. I generally try to "buy once, cry once," but this time it took me two shots. It really doesn't cost that much more to get all three: sine wave, broad range of input voltage, and higher surge tolerance. The last thing I wanted in an emergency was for my backup energy supply to fail just like the grid.
 

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Thank you for all that info. Please, what is the brand and model of inverter you purchased that met all 3 requirements mentioned.
Im happy to spend more to get quality the first time.
 
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