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Discussion Starter #1
Hello!

I'm currently looking into getting a 2017 Volt and I was wondering what I'd need to do to use the charger that comes with the car with a NEMA 14-50 outlet we have in the garage. From my searching so far it sounds like even though Chevy doesn't advertise the charger as handling 240v, it will, so then do I just need a plug adapter?

Sorry in advance - I've had a hard time searching for the answer (it doesn't help that google half the time takes you to the archive version of this forum).
 

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Thanks! I knew it was out there somewhere

it looks like that thread is at 47 pages long: I think I may need to block off the rest of the week to get through it
Most of the 47 pages is an argument about how to keep someone from plugging a 120 volt device into your new 240 volt socket, (hint: don't leave your adapter plugged in if you remove the EVSE).
It boils down to, for the Gen 2 EVSE, you just need an adapter to go between your 120 volt plug on the EVSE and the 240 volt socket on the wall.
 

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it looks like that thread is at 47 pages long: I think I may need to block off the rest of the week to get through it
Just read the first post. If you understand what Chris TX is saying, you can make your own adapter plug. If you don't (that would be me), you can pm him and he'll make one for you (for a reasonable price!). That's my plan, if I ever feel the need to install a 240v line to my garage.
 

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I made the adapter and keep it in the car with the L1 EVSE just in case I'm at a place where they have a 240V outlet available. I did a NEMA 6-50 plug since my brother-in-law has welding machines in his garage, but some day I'll also make a 14-50 version and just keep both in the car.

All you really need to know is where the two hot lines and the ground are in the 240V plug and wire those up to a 120V female receptacle.

Do at your own risk of course, and label the gizmo accordingly so that nobody does anything especially stupid with it.
 

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Here's a cheaper adapter from Amazon, only 40 Amps, but you will never exceed that with the Volt.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00TCZZ16M?psc=1

Make sure to label your Home Depot female connector with 240 V.
You could alternatively purchase a 14-30 version for a clothes dryer, and grind off the neutral blade so that it would also plug into a 14-50. Advantage is thinner wiring for easier handling (but still way overkill for the 12 amp charge cord) and maybe save a dollar or two.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Here's what I did:

I bought this one from Amazon:
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And then this plug adapter from Home Depot:
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Connect the green wire to the ground on the female plug, then the red and the black to the other two. Tuck away the white wire and cover it.

Has worked flawlessly for me.
Perfect; thanks! I just got around to going through the first few pages and was about to ask if it just basically comes down to buying a simple dryer cord and a connector. I ended up getting both from Amazon since the connector was more expensive at home depot (and my Volt won't be in for a few days so I have time to spare).

Regarding the neutral wire: did you leave it unhooked in the connector or cut it off? (might be a stupid question - I've never put something like this together so I'm not sure what the inside of that connector actually looks like)
 

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I made the adapter and keep it in the car with the L1 EVSE just in case I'm at a place where they have a 240V outlet available. I did a NEMA 6-50 plug since my brother-in-law has welding machines in his garage, but some day I'll also make a 14-50 version and just keep both in the car.

All you really need to know is where the two hot lines and the ground are in the 240V plug and wire those up to a 120V female receptacle.

Do at your own risk of course, and label the gizmo accordingly so that nobody does anything especially stupid with it.
What's the advantage of 14-50 vs 6-50? They are both grounded from what I read.
 

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What's the advantage of 14-50 vs 6-50? They are both grounded from what I read.
Generally - a 14- series can provide a neutral so that a plugged in device can use either/both 120v and/or 240v. A NEMA 6 is 240v only.

From an EV point of view, a 6-50 would be fine. However Tesla recognized early on that folks would want to take their long-range cars on road trips. And sans Superchargers, a relatively convenient way to charge on the road is at RV campgrounds where NEMA 14-50s are almost ubiquitous. You can pull up to 10kW from a 14-50 - which strangely enough, just matches the default charger supplied in the Model S (up to a few months ago.) So every Tesla comes with a 120v 5-15 adapter and a 14-50 adapter. Other adapters are also available.
 

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Regarding the neutral wire: did you leave it unhooked in the connector or cut it off? (might be a stupid question - I've never put something like this together so I'm not sure what the inside of that connector actually looks like)
I only cut off partially the neutral wire and sealed off the end, and taped it to the main wire so it doesn't dangle. I did this just in case I may need to use the wire again, like installing a permanent outlet on the wall.
 
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