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Discussion Starter #1
1) So if you drive almost exclusively on electricity, how often do you need to put the thing in manual and substantially drain the tank of gas so it doesn't get stale?
2) How often should you crank the engine on (even for just a little while) just to make sure it stays lubricated?
3) What about putting in dry-gas to help stabilize a tank of gas if you almost never use it?
 

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1) So if you drive almost exclusively on electricity, how often do you need to put the thing in manual and substantially drain the tank of gas so it doesn't get stale?
2) How often should you crank the engine on (even for just a little while) just to make sure it stays lubricated?
3) What about putting in dry-gas to help stabilize a tank of gas if you almost never use it?
The engine fires up eventually to keep everything in good shape if you don't use the ICE.
Your fuel system is vapor sealed by law.
 

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1) So if you drive almost exclusively on electricity, how often do you need to put the thing in manual and substantially drain the tank of gas so it doesn't get stale?
2) How often should you crank the engine on (even for just a little while) just to make sure it stays lubricated?
3) What about putting in dry-gas to help stabilize a tank of gas if you almost never use it?
1) Not to worry, the Volt has you covered. The Volt's Fuel Maintenance Mode automatically keeps track of the average age of the fuel in the 8.9 gallon fuel tank and will automatically begin to burn the fuel as you drive when the fuel is approximately 12 months old.

2) The Volt has you covered here too. The Volt will automatically start the gas engine every 6 weeks for a short period, burning a small amount of gas, if you have not used any gas in that period of time. This will circulate the oil and lubricate the seals. This is called Engine Maintenance Mode (EMM) and can be negotiated/delayed by the driver a few times, then the Volt will perform EMM.
3) Not recommended by GM. The Volt's fuel tank is pressurized so there is little chance of moisture contaminating the fuel while in the fuel tank.

If you truly never use the gas engine, keeping a minimum of 3 gallons of fuel in the fuel tank (as recommended in the 2017 Volt Owner's Manual) will last thru a year of EMM cycles and any remaining gas will be used up as the Volt enters FMM. Then you would add 3 gallons of fresh fuel and be set for another 12 months.
 

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No need to worry about any of that. The car keeps track of when the engine was last operated and goes into an Engine Maintenance Mode (EMM) about every 6 weeks to lube everything up and check that everything is operating properly usually about 10 minutes. Then, about once a year it goes into what is called Fuel Maintenance Mode (FMM) which burns fuel that has been in the tank for an average of one year. FMM definitely runs longer since it needs to burn the old fuel to a point that any new fuel added brings the average age to a more recent figure. Some have said FMM runs until you have just under 2 gallons left so most who drive nearly exclusively in EV only keep enough fuel in the tank that it minimizes how long FMM runs.
 

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Why buy an EREV/PHEV if an EV would do the trick?
You are right, if you will never exceed the round trip range of an EV then having a PHEV is not necessary. Having the option of taking a longer trip without having to worry about finding recharging stations is one reason. Flexibility is another. CCS and other fast charge stations are not yet that common. You can take a long road trip in a Tesla vehicle and use the Tesla Supercharger network but even with the option of supercharging a really long trip such as Houston to Chicago (approximately 1100 miles) becomes a test of one's road trip endurance when you consider the time spent charging for both legs of the trip.

If you drove the same trip in a Volt, starting with a full tank (8.9 gallons), you would need to refuel twice using approximately 26 gallons of gas @ 42mpg. If you chose to use Hold Mode for the trip to Chicago you would still have 50+ miles of battery range when you arrive in the windy city and approximately 1 gallon of gas remaining in the fuel tank.
 

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I have to agree with jcanoe. I love being able to do all of my in town driving in EV mode only. However, longer trips make charging options a requirement. I really don't mind the idea of sitting for 30-45 minutes at an open and functioning charging station. However, as often as I read nail biting stories about "missing" or broken charging stations, nevermind those with a wait, I'd much rather stick with the convenience of finding a gas station. National charging infrastructure is definitely improving, and hopefully will continue to a point where my above concerns are no longer valid. I would imagine in the early days of cars, even gas stations were far and few between. I guess we're at a point where those who are adopting new technology are just having to go through the growing pains associated with it.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
1) Not to worry, the Volt has you covered. The Volt's Fuel Maintenance Mode automatically keeps track of the average age of the fuel in the 8.9 gallon fuel tank and will automatically begin to burn the fuel as you drive when the fuel is approximately 12 months old.

2) The Volt has you covered here too. The Volt will automatically start the gas engine every 6 weeks for a short period, burning a small amount of gas, if you have not used any gas in that period of time. This will circulate the oil and lubricate the seals. This is called Engine Maintenance Mode (EMM) and can be negotiated/delayed by the driver a few times, then the Volt will perform EMM.
3) Not recommended by GM. The Volt's fuel tank is pressurized so there is little chance of moisture contaminating the fuel while in the fuel tank.

If you truly never use the gas engine, keeping a minimum of 3 gallons of fuel in the fuel tank (as recommended in the 2017 Volt Owner's Manual) will last thru a year of EMM cycles and any remaining gas will be used up as the Volt enters FMM. Then you would add 3 fresh gallons of fuel and be set for another 12 months.
Great explanation. GM thought of everything. Thanks.
 

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And make sure you use top tier fuel. I tend to stick with BP, Shell, or Exxon/Mobil and surprisingly Marathon was not top tier last time I checked. Avoid Caseys, Speedway, Pilot, etc.
 

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You could download the Owner's Manual and answer this sort of question.

The Volt was just a stepping stone for me to go full BEV.

A Bolt is in my future, but no hurry.
I am enjoying using a 82 mile range BEV, +30,000 miles in <2 yrs, mostly on Free Public charging.
I plug in at home overnight during the dead of winter for TMS reasons.

I RARELY fire up the 'Stinker', (a '04 Honda Element, 5spd AWD), and that is sometimes because I'm hauling a large amount of 'Stuff'....
 

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I have to agree with jcanoe. I love being able to do all of my in town driving in EV mode only. However, longer trips make charging options a requirement. I really don't mind the idea of sitting for 30-45 minutes at an open and functioning charging station. However, as often as I read nail biting stories about "missing" or broken charging stations, nevermind those with a wait, I'd much rather stick with the convenience of finding a gas station. National charging infrastructure is definitely improving, and hopefully will continue to a point where my above concerns are no longer valid. I would imagine in the early days of cars, even gas stations were far and few between. I guess we're at a point where those who are adopting new technology are just having to go through the growing pains associated with it.


Nothing convenient about smelling disgusting gas fumes and touching a disgusting gas nozzle while guzzling toxic finite fuel into the vehicle in which you are driving. I can't wait to get rid of my Volt and get a Tesla.


I drove from Simi Valley, CA to Vegas and Reno in a Model S absolutely no problem.


Unless you're a hard ass, you are going to stop multiple times on a rare long road trip. And thats when you take a lunch break/stretch and charge your car. Best thing ever.


Tesla has the greatest Navigation system which makes it fun to go and charge your car. Keyword: Fun, not an inconvenience. There is no rush in life.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
And make sure you use top tier fuel. I tend to stick with BP, Shell, or Exxon/Mobil and surprisingly Marathon was not top tier last time I checked. Avoid Caseys, Speedway, Pilot, etc.
I guess you've never seen the truck fill up the off-brand station, and then drive across the street to fill up the Shell tanks. It happens all the time, especially with independent dealers.

And Pilot is considered top-tier fuel.
 

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It's convenient, I didn't say pleasant. :) I would love to be able to go full EV but the Volt was the best I could do and a Tesla or any other long range BEV will be many years down the road if at all. I tend to keep my vehicles until the wheels fall off and I suspect barring any major electrical/computer issues, the Volt will be with me for many years to come.

I agree that with a Tesla long drives are much easier and the integrated navigation with supercharger network makes finding a charging station much easier. I think Tesla is kind of a league all it's own in that respect since you not only have a dedicate, generally well maintained proprietary network of charging, but you can also utilize public charging which significant increases your charging options and reduces range anxiety. On the other hand if one were to own a Bolt, without that SC network then you have to rely on WORKING charging locations. I know that most charging stations are listed in apps and websites, but I also wish they would include a way to indicate working units. Chargepoint does well in showing how many and their availability but I believe those that are non-working tend to still indicate "empty and available" giving a false indication that they can be used.
 

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I guess you've never seen the truck fill up the off-brand station, and then drive across the street to fill up the Shell tanks. It happens all the time, especially with independent dealers.

And Pilot is considered top-tier fuel.
Pilot isn't listed here

http://www.toptiergas.com/licensedbrands/

And it's not the fuel itself. Itsit's the detergent packets they use. I'm not sure if they put the detergent in at the gas station or as they are filling the tanker. There is a local marathon fueling station with huge tanks, and you can see all the different tankers pulling up to get filled.
 

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While my daily commute is covered by the battery pack charge, I drive almost weekly to remote trailheads adjacent to wilderness areas throughout the Rocky Mountains. Last year, I drove 4,000 miles through the Northern Rockies without access to a single charging station. That is the reason that I must have a plug-in hybrid rather than an all-electric vehicle.
 

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Nothing convenient about smelling disgusting gas fumes and touching a disgusting gas nozzle while guzzling toxic finite fuel into the vehicle in which you are driving. I can't wait to get rid of my Volt and get a Tesla.


I drove from Simi Valley, CA to Vegas and Reno in a Model S absolutely no problem.


Unless you're a hard ass, you are going to stop multiple times on a rare long road trip. And thats when you take a lunch break/stretch and charge your car. Best thing ever.


Tesla has the greatest Navigation system which makes it fun to go and charge your car. Keyword: Fun, not an inconvenience. There is no rush in life.
I never notice the smell of regular gas unless someone has previously spilled some fuel. I call diesel fuel Chanel No. 2; the smell can linger on your hands and clothes for hours.

Simi Valley to Las Vegas being ~300 miles is well within the range of 1 tank of gas for the Volt. Simi Valley to Reno is ~500 miles, so it would require one fill up along the way. Sometimes when time was of the essence I would pack a lunch and stop only for gas and bathroom breaks. 500 miles is a lot of driving, would definitely want to switch off driving with a second driver/passenger. Adaptive Cruise Control is a big help on long trips. These days I would consider a trip in my Volt of 300 miles but traffic, construction zones and tolls make this less attractive that taking a train or flying.
 

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TG for built in nav system - I forgot where they put the gas station ;-)
 

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You just described my life with a Volt. 7+ months of ownership, 59xx miles as our DD and I'm operating our 2017 Volt at 99.2% all electric. Dealer delivered it with about 7 gallon's of gas and so far I have used less than 1/2 a gallon of gas. Hell I have used 3 gallons of gas in our lawn mower this spring.

So unless I take a LONG road trip come this Aug I will be forced to burn all that off. I could fill the tank and cause the computer to recalibrate the computer and extend it several months, but eventually I'll be forced to use it.

But don't worry I actually have a long trip planned before I'm forced to burn off that 7 gallons.

Looks like I could easily live with the old MS40.
 

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You just described my life with a Volt. 7+ months of ownership, 59xx miles as our DD and I'm operating our 2017 Volt at 99.2% all electric. Dealer delivered it with about 7 gallon's of gas and so far I have used less than 1/2 a gallon of gas. Hell I have used 3 gallons of gas in our lawn mower this spring.

So unless I take a LONG road trip come this Aug I will be forced to burn all that off. I could fill the tank and cause the computer to recalibrate the computer and extend it several months, but eventually I'll be forced to use it.

But don't worry I actually have a long trip planned before I'm forced to burn off that 7 gallons.

Looks like I could easily live with the old MS40.
Here's what you need to get your mowing down to 0 gallons of gas. They sell them at Home Depot

https://www.ryobitools.com/electric-riding-mower/

Norm51 on this forum bought one. I'm tempted, but I'm holding out for a wider mower deck (i need at least 54 inches) and bigger batteries.
 
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