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Highways England today announced a plan to start testing of wireless charging tech to allow EVs and hybrids to travel much longer distances on the UK's major roads without needing to stop.

Trials are to start before the end of the year and should run for around 18 months, after which the hope is to progress to testing the wireless charging infrastructure on real roads.

http://www.engadget.com/2015/08/11/under-road-wireless-charging/

Needless to say, that would be an interesting road upgrade, but I think it would likely take many decades to roll out for even a small percentage of highway roads.
 

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Despite seeming rather far-fetched, this idea of dynamic wireless power transfer is still intriguing.

But, looking into it, one thing I haven't been able to figure out is the physical layout of the under-road coils. I saw a video of a test done at ORNL where they used individual circular coils -- just like you'd have in a stationary wireless charger -- spaced out with one every few feet. But this seems like it would be very difficult to make work, given that the vehicle would only be aligned with each pad for a few milliseconds when traveling over it at highway speeds.

I also saw some renderings of a hypothetical system where the coils in the road were long loops, many yards long and maybe a couple feet wide. This seems like it would be much more practical, but I don't have any understanding of the technical implications of using long looped coils vs circular coils.
 

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A solution in search of a problem. Parking space charging would be a more appropriate use of this funding.

For a narrow use-case (such as a bus route) it could be feasible. Still, a bus is stationary A LOT.
 

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A solution in search of a problem. Parking space charging would be a more appropriate use of this funding.
If successful, dynamic wireless power transfer could:

-Make long-distance highway travel possible with BEV's without needing to stop periodically to charge
-Virtually eliminate the need for installation of most Supercharger/DCFC stations
-Allow BEV's to significantly downsize their battery packs -- reducing BEV prices, reducing vehicle weight, increasing efficiencies, reducing the upfront manufacturing energy requirements of BEV's, etc., etc.

In short, it could be a game-changer for widespread EV adoption. Emphasis on "could". There are plenty of pitfalls and hurdles, both technical and economical. And I wouldn't bet on this ever becoming a reality. But that's why you spend money on *research*, and not just a few more L2 chargers at the local mall.
 
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