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I was reading about the Hyundai Ioniq EV lease deals, and Hyundai is offering something they call the "Ultimate" lease package. Under that lease agreement, miles are unlimited, the owner receives a reimbursement for charging costs, brake replacements, etc. However, one thing stuck out to me... the package also included free 12 V battery replacement.

Does this mean Hyundai didn't find a way around the U.S. requirement for a 12 V backup electrical system?
 

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I don't know about the 12v battery, but in my mind the ultimate lease package is 100% down, $0 per month 0% money factor, unlimited term, unlimited miles. Sadly, most people don't qualify for this ultimate lease because they can't get that first part down. But anything less, you're putting your future at risk. People should be more risk averse.

Why in the world would you need brake replacement on an EV? Regen should mean very little brake wear. It makes me think they're giving you a free q2v baterynif you need it, and if it doesn't have one, well?

Unlimited miles can't be true. Otherwise someone can destroy the value of the residual by putting 100k miles on the car in 3 years.

What are the terms for the reimbursement of charging costs? Could I go plug in at a $2 per hour chargepoint and expect that to be reimbursed? And when I leave it all day, the charges increase to $8 per hour, what happens then?

This must be a regional thing as I can't seem to find anything online about this ultimate lease for an ioniq. If it truly is unlimited miles and free charging where I can charge at the overpriced chargepoint at work, you might see LLninja break two of his rules of like: never lease, and never get a Korean car. Bacardi would drop dead from laughter if I ended up leasing a car.
 

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Ah, the fine print.... only available to California residents.
 

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If the Ioniq doesn't have that 12 VDC battery, then the HV battery is always live and that is DANGEROUS. Maybe they get around the danger by placing the DC-DC converter directly on the HVDC terminals and the 12 VDC output is always live and fused. Then the HVDC output is through a relay under the 12 VDC power as it is done on other EVs. But it is risky in a way.
 

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There is always going to be a 12v battery, even if it's small. It'll be necessary to run the hazard blinkers when the car is disabled. The main traction battery would never tolerate a constant inverter draw given that it will commonly have the LiOn run to low SOC and a useable range that can't be exceeded.
 

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If the Ioniq doesn't have that 12 VDC battery, then the HV battery is always live and that is DANGEROUS. Maybe they get around the danger by placing the DC-DC converter directly on the HVDC terminals and the 12 VDC output is always live and fused. Then the HVDC output is through a relay under the 12 VDC power as it is done on other EVs. But it is risky in a way.
You can get rid of the traditional 12 VDC battery and use something else. The lower voltage and higher voltage systems have to be present, but there are many ways besides a 12 VDC lead acid to meet the safety requirements for disconnecting the traction battery. The Ioniq uses an additional 12 VDC Li-ion module.
 
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