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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
The numbers are out and traffic deaths went up again last year, with almost 2,000 more people dying in traffic accidents than the previous year. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 37,461 people died in traffic accidents in 2016.

That number is the highest it’s been since 2007. It’s a 5.6% increase from last year, and according to analysts, there are a few reasons why the fatality rate is increasing.

One factor was the rebounding economy. As the economy improved, the general reduction of highway fatalities of the past decade began to reverse starting in 2014. More people working meant more drivers on the road, and more vehicle miles traveled (VMTs). But the rise can’t only be blamed on the increased traffic on the road. Not only did Americans drive more in 2016 than the previous year, but the number of deaths per VMT increased by 2.6%.

Surprisingly, the increase cannot be blamed on distracted driving which actually went down last year. An increase in drunk driving, speeding, and not wearing seatbelts were contributing factors in most fatal crashes – and all showed an increase from the previous year.

https://www.nhtsa.gov/press-releases/usdot-releases-2016-fatal-traffic-crash-data

NHTSA’s 2016 data shows that:

  • Distraction-related deaths (3,450 fatalities) decreased by 2.2 percent;
  • Drowsy-driving deaths (803 fatalities) decreased by 3.5 percent;
  • Drunk-driving deaths (10,497 fatalities) increased by 1.7 per¬cent;
  • Speeding-related deaths (10,111 fatalities) increased by 4.0 percent;
  • Unbelted deaths (10,428 fatalities) increased by 4.6 percent;
  • Motorcyclist deaths (5,286 fatalities – the largest number of motorcyclist fatalities since 2008) increased by 5.1 percent;
  • Pedestrian deaths (5,987 fatalities – the highest number since 1990) increased by 9.0 percent; and
  • Bicyclist deaths (840 fatalities – the highest number since 1991) increased by 1.3 percent.

The number of fatalities in crashes involving large trucks also went up to 4,317. Of those, 722 were occupants of the trucks.

According to the NHTSA report, the estimated “comprehensive cost” of all traffic deaths in 2016 was $836 billion.

https://www.nhtsa.gov/press-releases/usdot-releases-2016-fatal-traffic-crash-data

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/traffic-fatalities-jump-by-5-6-percent-in-2016/

https://www.theverge.com/2017/10/6/16438444/traffic-fatalities-crash-statistics-us-2016
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Vehicle crashes are also hitting the insurance industry.

State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Co., the largest provider of car coverage in the U.S., posted an underwriting loss of $7 billion on the business last year, burned by higher-than-expected claims costs. Rivals, including Allstate Corp., Hartford Financial Services Group Inc. and the Geico unit at Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway Inc., have been pressured by rising costs on auto policies as repair costs climb.

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/arti...ntinue-to-rise-in-u-s-but-don-t-blame-texting
 

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The numbers are out and traffic deaths went up again last year, with almost 2,000 more people dying in traffic accidents than the previous year. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 37,461 people died in traffic accidents in 2016.

That number is the highest it’s been since 2007. It’s a 5.6% increase from last year, and according to analysts, there are a few reasons why the fatality rate is increasing.

One factor was the rebounding economy. As the economy improved, the general reduction of highway fatalities of the past decade began to reverse starting in 2014. More people working meant more drivers on the road, and more vehicle miles traveled (VMTs). But the rise can’t only be blamed on the increased traffic on the road. Not only did Americans drive more in 2016 than the previous year, but the number of deaths per VMT increased by 2.6%.

Surprisingly, the increase cannot be blamed on distracted driving which actually went down last year. An increase in drunk driving, speeding, and not wearing seatbelts were contributing factors in most fatal crashes – and all showed an increase from the previous year.

https://www.nhtsa.gov/press-releases/usdot-releases-2016-fatal-traffic-crash-data

NHTSA’s 2016 data shows that:

  • Distraction-related deaths (3,450 fatalities) decreased by 2.2 percent;
  • Drowsy-driving deaths (803 fatalities) decreased by 3.5 percent;
  • Drunk-driving deaths (10,497 fatalities) increased by 1.7 per¬cent;
  • Speeding-related deaths (10,111 fatalities) increased by 4.0 percent;
  • Unbelted deaths (10,428 fatalities) increased by 4.6 percent;
  • Motorcyclist deaths (5,286 fatalities – the largest number of motorcyclist fatalities since 2008) increased by 5.1 percent;
  • Pedestrian deaths (5,987 fatalities – the highest number since 1990) increased by 9.0 percent; and
  • Bicyclist deaths (840 fatalities – the highest number since 1991) increased by 1.3 percent.

The number of fatalities in crashes involving large trucks also went up to 4,317. Of those, 722 were occupants of the trucks.

According to the NHTSA report, the estimated “comprehensive cost” of all traffic deaths in 2016 was $836 billion.

https://www.nhtsa.gov/press-releases/usdot-releases-2016-fatal-traffic-crash-data

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/traffic-fatalities-jump-by-5-6-percent-in-2016/
If only 9% of the drivers were distracted, there are a LOT of homicidal maniacs with cars.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
If only 9% of the drivers were distracted, there are a LOT of homicidal maniacs with cars.
Unsurprisingly, it’s the unholy trinity of drunk driving (up 1.7 percent), speeding (up 4 percent), and unbuckled occupants (up 4.9 percent) that’s mostly responsible.
 

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And all of this is preventable by getting humans out of the loop. Heck, we'd probably be thrilled if even half of these people survived. I can't wait for self-driving cars. Even the safety valves of driver-assist features will help.

It's not so bad when drunks kill themselves. That's a Darwinian selection thing. It's the collateral damage. It's a very traumatic thing when a family member gets taken out by a maniac.
 

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How many were run over by EV's with no fake engine noise generators?
 
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