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Haven't heard much about this topic here... are people replacing their TPMS sensors when they change tires (at 50k or so miles) or waiting until they die? What's the cost for replacements? Seems it might be cheaper to do when they're already mounting new tires, but I don't really know. I'm looking to get new tires later this year and just want to hear some of your experiences.
 

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Haven't heard much about this topic here... are people replacing their TPMS sensors when they change tires (at 50k or so miles) or waiting until they die? What's the cost for replacements? Seems it might be cheaper to do when they're already mounting new tires, but I don't really know. I'm looking to get new tires later this year and just want to hear some of your experiences.
TPMS last a fairly long time, 7 years is not unusual. On some TPMS you can replace the battery but typically the whole TPMS must be replaced.
 

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You're looking at 4ish years for tires?
I would just wait it out and change them with your second round in year 8.
Not sure which grade we have, but I've read 7-10 years and 100 000mi is the design life.
 

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I've read 7-10 years and 100 000mi is the design life.
I'm at 6.5 years on mine, same as my 12V battery. Which will go first? :)
 

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What's the cost for replacements?
Hi, let me give you an estimate - here's the selection of the TPMS sensors for the 2013 Volt.

And also, let me tell you something about the service and repair of the TPMS sensors. There are TPMS service and repair kits, and we carry those, by the way. Yet when you replace the battery and insert the sensor back, most probably you will get the TPMS warning shortly. That sensor has got tiny electrical parts that not only wear with time due to moisture, vibration and stuff, and on top of that it gets damaged during the battery replacement process. So when the battery is dead, it's always better to replace, rather than try fix it.
 

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.... it's always better to replace, rather than try fix it.
+1
Tire shops will tell you, at the very least, to buy a kit at each tire change to 'refresh' the rubber bits.

But as always, Amazon has brand new AC Delco TPMS sensors amazingly inexpensive.

Sorry carid guys....

But if you just let them go, what's the worst that can happen? You get the light and no tire pressure info your display.

The shop I go to charged me $15 to replace a 'Bad out of Stock' one and do the 'Relearn'.
They only have to break the bead near the sensor to replace it and the tire/wheel does not have to be rebalanced.
 
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