GM Volt Forum banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
96 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I wanted to let everyone know these textile traction devices are wonderful and I'll never go back to chains. I got a set off Ebay for $35 and took them up after we got &' of fresh snow. They seriously took 30sec to install per tire and the have zero noise/vibration. Light weight, great traction, doesn't scratch my TSW wheels and durable even though I was driving on exposed pavement for 5+ miles. I would recommend any brand of textile traction that fits properly according to your tire and wheel size I see no reason one design is better than another as they are just elastic and heavy polyester fiber, it is not complicated.

unnamed-2.jpg unnamed-2.jpg
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
20,022 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,405 Posts
Few MFRs recommend metal chains anymore on passenger cars, and the ones that do, often say 25 to 35 mph max speeds for chains or cables. This is for liability reasons. Chains can trash a car or even cause an accident.

Putting on cables/chains the side of a mountain road sucks big time. Obviously you need to work with gloves, and jacks aren't an option. Sometimes you need a shovel to do it right. Then you need to retightened them after a mile.

There are two different Snow/Ice situations: Seasonal and Mountain.

Mountain snow is unpredictable and can extend deep into spring, as late as May. It's much colder in general, more black ice especially on northern slopes, much steeper grades, and lots of one-way or zero shoulder areas. They don't salt the roads, and plowing is less frequent because roads are longer between turnaround areas. Chains are not optional when posted. They will ticket you for not having them when required, even 4x4 with snow tires. This is because of the slope of the roads and the fact one car can cause a massive traffic blockage.

These sound like they are suitable for mountains if they have enough grip on ice. Note that the most significant feature of chains is stopping distance. This is what keeps you on the mountain instead of the 2500' down the side of the embankment.

For flatland seasonal snow, I'll bet most people have never even dealt with chains or seen a CHAINS REQUIREMENT roadblock. Certainly not the Consumer Reports crew since they did not check stopping distance or compare them to chains. Example: Studded tires are as good as chains for accelerating. They will not stop nearly as well though, hence why they don't allow them as a chain replacement. Ditto for AWD with snow tires, except they won't even come close to accelerating like chains will either and really suck at stopping.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,439 Posts
Saw socks for the first time on Highway Thru Hell. Heavy wrecker was pulling a semi (with socks) up The Smasher. Told the driver they weren't for up here truck was from California) and to get some proper chains.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,672 Posts
I purchased a pair of Snow Socks for my 2017 Volt but have not had a chance to use them. My understanding is that the Snow Socks are intended for use on snow covered roads, only for limited distance at speeds up to 25 MPH. I purchased these with the idea that they might get my 2017 Volt that I run with the Michelin EnergySaver A/S tire unstuck or up the hill on my street but never intended to use the Snow Sock on the highway. Also, I think I got ripped off as I paid the U.K. seller for the deluxe model socks but from the color of the product I believe I received the standard model Snow Socks. I contacted the seller and they fed me this B.S. about how I needed to falsify an import/export document to avoid paying the VAT in order to return them. Right, like I am going to falsify a customs document. Buyer Beware!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,405 Posts
Did a little reading on the snow socks, since they are recommended by Jaguar Land Rover. At least the mainstream brands seems to be effective and legal in almost every country. AutoSock is the brand the JLR sells. Oddly enough, they are recommending them for front wheels only when using just 2. Best guess on that? Less likely to get damaged during a tight corner on pavement.

For Class 8 trucks, they even have them available with steel studs in them (Peerless).
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top