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My 2011 Volt has never been classified as an EV in IL and I still need to do the EPA testing.

Sorry for the small claims hassle...
 

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We know we have to pay, and we know it's too much, but they continue to kick us down and create more obstacles to overcome just to be legal.
Why does every registration have to be a one of a kind unique situation breaking new ground that has never been foreseen before?
I feel like I am on the Lewis and Clark expedition.
SNAFU

Don't expect DMV to understand how the Volt works. The person at the DMV may have mixed up Volt with Bolt. Or just totally screwed up.

Every registration does not need to be one of a kind. Again, my Volt registration has been handled correctly since 2011. Ditto my Bolt EV (EV license). You just got someone who made a mistake.
Illinois classifies PHEV like the Volt as a hybrid, not an EV:
"Electric vehicle" means a vehicle that is exclusively powered by and refueled by electricity, must be plugged in to charge, and is licensed to drive on public roadways. "Electric vehicle" does not include electric mopeds, electric off-highway vehicles, or hybrid electric vehicles and extended-range electric vehicles that are also equipped with conventional fueled propulsion or auxiliary engines.

I recommend ignoring the DMV counter advise and call the Sec of States office at 217-782-4908 (a PITA but worth a try). Don't try to explain how a Volt works, it's useless. Just tell them the DMV issues you the wrong license (EV) for your hybrid. How do you get the money back? They have a form of course.

To obtain your refund, please mail your Refund Request to:
Secretary of State
Department of Accounting Revenue
Refund Division
501 S. Second St., Rm. 222
Springfield, IL 62756
Refunds are generally processed within 30 days of receipt. For more information, please call 217-782-4908.

Luck!
 

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There's no one system that will be fair to all, but I think paying a fee based on miles driven comes closest. The state gets a "road use" fee based on miles driven, the drivers pay whatever for the fuel of their choice. Those getting 12MPG will pay more per mile than someone in a Prius.
 

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Yes, no perfect solution, but an annual mileage reading does not require the dystopian big brother approach, nor toll stations, sat links, etc. And certainly more fair than charging someone with a 5k/year EV $200 extra same as a 50k/year EV driver, and way more than a 5k/year gas driver. The fee would be based on miles, maybe vehicle weight like they do with trucks given heavier=more road damage?

One downside is some of those miles may be out of state vacation miles. Again, not perfect.
 

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The volt is a different car and they don't get it.
Your Volt doesn't have a gasoline engine, never burns gasoline so no need to test it?:unsure: Your Volt really is different.
 
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I have a 2011 volt and mine does use gas. It switches over to the gasoline engine when the battery EV has been used
In relation to smog testing, it seems the state got it right then. It's a hybrid (gas and electric).
 

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But I would support a tax system based on GVW and mileage.
Me too. If the aim of the tax is to raise funds for road repairs, a use tax seems the most equitable. The more you use (miles + weight-based wear) the more you pay. The gas tax is an attempt at this, as are license fees. But obviously it struggles as the number of non-gas powered transport vehicles increase.

Another option is a flat tax that everyone and every business pays even if you don't own a car. The assumption is roads are something you still benefit from whether directly or indirectly.
 
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