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I test drove the RAV 4 EV and really liked it. It has sufficient electric range for nearly any trip I take and is essentially a Tesla Model S with different skin.

Right now, I have a 2012 loaded Volt, with about 15 months left on the lease (409, including tax). I am way under on miles. My volt does not qualify for the HOV sticker.

I can lease the RAV 4 EV for no drive offs and about 440/month (including tax). I will get 2500 back from CARB and an HOV green sticker. It won't save me too much money, but I will have a versatile EV and I will save about $40 per month that I'm currently spending on gas. Come 2014, I will save another $40 per month that I'm spending on the Fasttrack lanes on the 110 freeway.

So, what do you think of this and whether I can get out of my lease through Leasetrader or swapalease?
 

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I'm sure someone out there would like to get a great deal on a used Volt.
 

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I know how you feel. I just got my RAV4 EV 3 days ago. My early 2011 Volt is not very attractive to people looking for a lease so it will just have to sit for a while.
 

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RAV4 = Tesla S?

Really?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I know how you feel. I just got my RAV4 EV 3 days ago. My early 2011 Volt is not very attractive to people looking for a lease so it will just have to sit for a while.
So, how do you like the RAV 4 EV and what are the pros and cons vis-a-vis the Volt?
 

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RAV4 = Tesla S?

Really?
No, not really the same. It does use the same battery technology, which is basically laptop batteries wired together, but it has many fewer cells. It also has a Tesla designed motor, but it only puts out 154 hp. That's more than adequate but hardly in the Model S class for power. Other than that there isn't any Telsa DNA in the car, which has it's good and bad points, the bad one being lots of plastic and an odd interior.

Toyota has cut the price since it has had trouble selling the thing, but it's still close to $50K. It's biggest problem IMO has been that Toyota chose to use the last generation RAV4 body, making the EV version look dowdy and dated.

It's something of a pig energy wise (74 MPGe Highway -- ugly) but it does has an EPA range of 103 miles, which should be more than adequate for local driving. Lots of storage space as well.
 

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So, how do you like the RAV 4 EV and what are the pros and cons vis-a-vis the Volt?
Well, 3 days is not a lot to be speaking but I like it so far. With the incentives and tax credit, the price is $35,000 and three year leases include the tax credit.

It is a lot faster than the Volt.... to the point that flooring the "gas" pedal causes tire squeal. It seems to be well built and has lots of technology. If your EVSE can do better, the onboard charger is capable of a 10Kw rate. Charging at a public Chargepoint unit was half the time I was getting (and it was limited to 6.6Kw). It is very quiet and rides well. The range "guess-o-meter" was saying 159 miles today.

A few minor odd things.... it has a lot of tech but no backup sensors. The backup camera is MUCH sharper than the Volt but I miss the guide-lines (which newer Volts don't have anyway).

I'll post more after about 2 weeks when I've had more time behind the wheel.
 

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I test drove the RAV 4 EV and really liked it. It has sufficient electric range for nearly any trip I take and is essentially a Tesla Model S with different skin.

Right now, I have a 2012 loaded Volt, with about 15 months left on the lease (409, including tax). I am way under on miles. My volt does not qualify for the HOV sticker.

I can lease the RAV 4 EV for no drive offs and about 440/month (including tax). I will get 2500 back from CARB and an HOV green sticker. It won't save me too much money, but I will have a versatile EV and I will save about $40 per month that I'm currently spending on gas. Come 2014, I will save another $40 per month that I'm spending on the Fasttrack lanes on the 110 freeway.

So, what do you think of this and whether I can get out of my lease through Leasetrader or swapalease?
You should definitely read this thread
http://gm-volt.com/forum/showthread.php?18692-2012-Chevy-VOLT-vs.-2012-Toyota-RAV4-EV-.-.-.-owner-s-perspective-of-both
 

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No, not really the same. It does use the same battery technology, which is basically laptop batteries wired together
Will you cut it out.

http://ev.sae.org/article/11923

SAE Interview With JB Straubel said:
Is Tesla still wedded to the 18650-form-factor cell? Are you looking beyond it?

For the immediate future we see 18650 as the most compelling. Believe me, we challenge it constantly. It always ends up being very controversial, for reasons I don’t totally understand. Nobody gives a damn about the shape and size of your fuel tank! But for some reason the shape and size of what you put your chemicals in to carry your energy in an EV is super controversial. What people should really debate is what are the nature of the chemicals inside; they’re what determines the cost and performance.

We use a nickel-cobalt-aluminum (LiNiCoAlO2) lithium-ion chemistry for our battery cathode material. We don’t use a titanate, which has about half the energy density but is generally good at high charge rates. Some start-ups are using metal oxides; we fall broadly in that category. At this point we really have heavily customized that cell. We’ve totally custom-engineered that cell working jointly with Panasonic to create. It’s an automotive cell, tested to automotive standards. It doesn’t go into laptops anywhere. What keeps us in that general shape and size is the production and cost efficiency. We’re seeing price points that none of the larger-format cells are able to meet.

The first question we ask when we meet a new cell company is, show us your roadmap and your cost roadmap. Nobody wants to talk about cost—they always leave that to the end of the discussion. That’s silly. For EVs, there are some key safety and performance metrics that are foundational. They have to be there. Beyond that the most important thing is cost efficiency of energy storage. So if anyone has a more cost-efficient cell architecture, we’d be all ears. Right now nobody has proven they have a more cost-effective cell architecture than ours.
 
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