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Not sure why this is here But the Chevy Volt concept and electric car is Unique to GM there is no competitors because there is no other car built with similar or same configuration.
 

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Well.....

Not sure why this is here But the Chevy Volt concept and electric car is Unique to GM there is no competitors because there is no other car built with similar or same configuration.
Actually, there are several companies that are working on either BEV's, PHEV's, parallel hybrids and series hybrids. Check out autobloggreen.com for some of the info.
Tagamet
 

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The future isn't that grim.

Not sure I can trust GM to deliver the Volt if there aren't any competitors, think EV1... Luckily, by the time the Volt is at my local dealership, there will be competition. They won't be the same as the Volt, but they will allow people to commute on electricity instead of gasoline like the Volt.

2011 is shaping up to be a good year to buy something to wean yourself from gas, and plug in to the grid for your daily commuting needs.
 

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Grim?

I don't think that the future is grim at all! I do agree that competition will drive innovation that will result in many "flavors" of solution that wean us off petroleum. GM's choice to go with a series rather than parallel design is a HUGE improvement over Toyota's current (no pun) hybrid. I'm totally in love with the idea of All Electric Range and its ability to recharge from the grid. Eventually, V2G may also become a reality. GM acknowledges its stupid handling of the EV1 and they can't afford to repeat old mistakes (on a LOT of levels). The transparency of the Volt's development is a symptom of past lessons learned.
Be well and God Bless,
Tagamet
 

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A few years ago, I told my wife that when I have a mid-life crisis and buy a car - I plan to make sure that it is a "plug-in".:) I see the current challenge of an "all electric" car being the cost of the batteries (look at the Tesla, for example). I'm hopeful about the Chevy Volt as it seems like good solution until the underlying technology advances to the point that batteries become relatively inexpensive. I'm curious to see what Mitsubishi might come up with over the next few years. Their MIEV technology (with in-wheel motors) looks promising.

I am fortunate enough that I walk to work, while my wife either rides her bicycle or takes the bus (when weather is bad). However, we still end off driving about 15,000 km (9500 miles) per year - a lot of it driving across town, etc. - but also occasional "road trips": 200 km to 2000 km.
 

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oil

We must find a way to stop our oil dependency.. this is a BIG step in that direction. I hope it is soon on the market and it is as good as we expect:) I have never owned any thing but GM in my driving history.. 49 years :eek:
 

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First Step

This is indeed a first step. But there is another step we all can benefit from. I just replaced all my gas powered garden tools with electrics. They work better with no fumes and no trip to the gas station. All you need to do is get the right amps machine for the job you want to do. Even the wood chipper works great. My neighbors here in oil country Texas think I
 

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I was going to say the exact same thing. What competitors? Toyota's car is set back a couple of years and will have inferior technology.

On a related note, I saw my first Smart Car in town the other day. Now if they ever turn that into a PHEV, that could pose some competition, at least at the low price end.
 

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Jack Welch always pushed his executives to broadly define their markets, so that they no longer ranked themselves #1 or #2. I say the Chevy Volt competes in the same class as other vehicles with the same seating and styling, and needs to meet or beat ICE vehicles in some aspect to command a premium price - in most cases, mileage / cost per mile.

As far as tech, there are vehicles emerging with tech that could easily be dropped into a competing vehicle - Fisker hybrid, Tesla Motors REEV, Tata Air Car, eTec Hydrogen ICE and so on. Perhaps there are no vehicles in the Volt's class for $35K, but in a year or two, any of these companies (with the right partner) could offer one.
 

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.

Plenty of competitors and a whole bunch more coming. The most well known is the prius, another would be phoenix motor cars ev truck just to name a couple.
 

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One thing to think about that an electric car is it's own enemy. The more people use electricity to drive, the higher electricity rates will be and the more oil goes down. Just the psychological effect of knowing that oil isn't the only option we have could drop oil prices to rock bottom levels. What happens then? Everyone just sticks with their regular ICE only cars.

Do I really think that will happen? Nope, I think oil will be expensive for a long time, probably forever. Everyone has completely forgotten that as recently as the beginning of the current presidential term, oil prices were at $30 a barrel. 6 years ago oil was in the teens! Now OPEC is freaking out that they can't balance their budget unless they can get it back up to $80-90/barrel. I don't think they'll ever come back down. Not until there's absolutely no use for it. Gas is perfect for small engines like chainsaws and lawn mowers, but hopefully, the government can figure out how to plan a little more long term and help get this oil dependency in the past.
 

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One thing to think about that an electric car is it's own enemy. The more people use electricity to drive, the higher electricity rates will be and the more oil goes down.
That's true to some extent but if the Volt's specs are accurate, there is an order of magnitude difference in the cost per mile between gas and electricity.

Of course there is more to it than just cost. Almost all of our electricity is produced domestically which means all the money we spend on it stays in our economy, not someone else's.
 
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