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The VOLT could never use home electricity if each time the car will come back in your garage, the battery is full charge. In fact, depending how many miles the car will cover during a day, the battery will be between low and full charge when it will come back at home.
GM said the car will cover 40 miles a day; so, if the distance between your work and your house is 20 miles, then, when you will come back at home, the battery will be at low charge and you will have to plug-in to recharge one's batteries.
But if the distance you will cover during a day is more than forty miles and just enough for the car generator to recharge the volt batteries at full charge, then, when the car will come back in your garage, you will no need to plug it in.
In this way, the VOLT will be a gaz car.
Do you think I'm right when I say that?
 

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You are mistaken. The generator only keeps the SOC, (state of charge) at 30% capacity. When you plug in at home, it will charge to 80% of capacity, which is the norm.
 

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I think there will be situations where the charge could come back up while driving such as on a long downhill after a long climb. I would assume they would use the excess power from the ICE (and regenerative braking) to bring the charge back up.

Or not.....
 

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Electric Motor: 120kW (peak)
Genset: 53kW (peak)

A full-charge at the end of the day would only happen if the electric motor (and other devices) ran at less than the power the genset supplies while running. And even then, it would probably take days.

A lot of engineering will be involved in optimizing the Volt. I would imagine GM plans to allow the genset to charge the battery beyond 30% to allow for a "buffer" so you can have short bursts of performance when needed, and then throttle the genset to keep the battery charge level consistent (at around 40%, allowing for a 10% buffer for performance-on-demand). But if the battery drops to 30% charge with the genset still running at peak power, throttle/cap the electric motor so it cannot demand more power than the genset can supply to the batteries.

But who knows, they may just run the genset non-stop at full power until it reaches 80% charge and skip all the complexities of trying to guess how the driver drives.

The genset can be underpowered, but it can also be overpowered. It all depends on your driving style and how GM plans to tune the genset usage. If you were to drive non-aggressively, and if the genset didn't throttle itself, I would imagine it could charge the batteries to full (80%) charge. But it would probably take days while driving.
 
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