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This would be the level of control that the computers have. It seams that just about all driver controles are processed & activated by the computers, with the possible exceptions of the unassisted breaking and steering.

This is a major step towards the day when we ride in cars that computers will be driving.

Any one have any concerns or better info on this?
 

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I don't think it's all that different from other cars. Prius is just about all drive-by-wire for example.
 

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Yes, the Prius would be the closest, but how close, I don't realy know, there may be a large difference between drive by wire and drive by a wire through as much processing as the Volt does.
 

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Consider that there has been significant steps in safety for this already.

  • Electronic Stability Control
  • Antiskid avoidance
  • Rollover avoidance
  • Vehicle Dynamics Control
  • Anti-lock brakes
  • etc

The Volt systems extend on this for efficiency for EV range it seems. As well the saftey issues related to having a battery (manage cells, look for problems, manage ON/OFF in the case of accident (off major, leave on for *minor* so you are not stranded).

http://www.smartplanet.com/business/blog/smart-takes/gms-volt-10-million-lines-of-code/12006/

Make no mistake about it. The Volt is more software and code than anything else. The car, which GM hopes will give it an edge on rivals, has 100 electronic controllers, 10 million lines of software code and its own IP address. A car in the 1980s was roughly 5 percent electronics. The Chevy Volt is 40 percent. GM likens the product development for the Volt to a rocket program.
 

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The Volt has electric powered steering and brake assist also. The brakes are an integral part of the computer controlled traction, Stabilitrac, and ABS, but there may not be any actual computer control on the steering.

Jerry, #536
 

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I agree that the Volt does not seem to have computer controlled steering.

But the position of the steering wheel is probably used as input to the computerized traction control system. And no doubt a future version of the Volt will automate parallel parking somewhat, a feature that is present in many cars today.
 

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I want a CUV version of the Voltec with the least amount of electronics ... I just want to commute to work..
I'm looking for reliability and durability... plain and rugged nothing fancy... a basic rugged reliable practical .... CHEVY.
Plain comfortable rugged seats like the ones I had in the Montana.. the seats looked like new after 9 years of city driving.
My last Chevy was 20 years old when I sold it everything still worked and it looked good driving away with it's new owner.
 

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I agree that the Volt does not seem to have computer controlled steering.

But the position of the steering wheel is probably used as input to the computerized traction control system.
The steering wheel position is normally an input to the stability control (anti-skid) computer.

At least on the 2nd generation Prius, the stability control system was rumored to reduce power steering assistance during a loss of traction to help the driver avoid excessive steering changes during a skid. I don't know if the Volt's Stabilitrak does this.
 

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I don't think it's all that different from other cars. Prius is just about all drive-by-wire for example.
Honoreitis is right....even today's non-hybrid gas cars have MANY electronic control units (ECUs).
In 2002, cars had between 50-90 ECUs each. Hybrids and the Volt are slightly higher, but not all that much compared
with conventional cars...

See chart below:
ECUs in cars.JPG
 
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