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Hello:

I feel that the spare tire is worth the money. It only took me a 1/2 hour to install. I ordered it from my dealer. I believe it was a little over $400.00. You just have to get the tire put on the rim. The kit comes with a jack and tire iron. While I don't like to waste money, if I get a flat I like the idea that I have a spare. I can still pile all my groceries into the car and it doesn't weigh all that much! The first time someone gets a flat they will say to themselves, "I should have bought and installed a spare tire".

Big Moe
 

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Thanks for posting this, Big Moe. I have a question about the installation:

When the tire is removed from the trunk area, say to load it up with a big box or a piece of furniture, does the post stick up through the floor? or does it come out or lay flat?
 

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Why not trade the stock rubber for run flat tires ?
Good question.
Run Flats are very heavy and rough riding.
Cars need to be designed for them, in order to keep a decent ride quality.
Even then, most people (who have run-flats) ditch them, for non run-flats, and never look back.
 

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I don't really miss the space my spare takes up either. Everything I have needed to carry so far can be loaded around or on it.

I think the $400 is too high, though. Some people have put together equivalent equipment for much less.
 

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Good question.
Run Flats are very heavy and rough riding.
Cars need to be designed for them, in order to keep a decent ride quality.
Even then, most people (who have run-flats) ditch them, for non run-flats, and never look back.
Just as a note the Bolt EV is supposed to come equipped with Michelin energy saver tires that are the same size as the Gen II Volt and they are supposed to be self sealing. So these tires should work with the Volt.
 

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Good question.
Run Flats are very heavy and rough riding.
Cars need to be designed for them, in order to keep a decent ride quality.
Even then, most people (who have run-flats) ditch them, for non run-flats, and never look back.
Not true. We have been running Bridgestone DriveGuards on my wife's 2015 Volt for over 10K miles and love them. They are better than the stock GY Assurances in every way except range. They are much quieter, handle way better, stop better and have the same ride quality. You do pay a 10% mileage penalty but never have to be worried about a flat tire stranding you.
 

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How are you securing the tire, in the event of an impact I hate to think of what could happen with that 35 pounds of dead weight? Personally I'm replacing my OEM with the new Bridgestone DriveGuards. The new run-flats are not like the older ones. I know the new Michelin run falts on my 2014 Stingray are friggin awesome and Corvette guys are raving about them.
 

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Good question.
Run Flats are very heavy and rough riding.
Cars need to be designed for them, in order to keep a decent ride quality.
Even then, most people (who have run-flats) ditch them, for non run-flats, and never look back.
The main thing for me is that run flats are not low rolling resistance tires, so you will have shorter electric range and lower gasoline fuel economy.

Keith
 

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How are you securing the tire, in the event of an impact I hate to think of what could happen with that 35 pounds of dead weight?
The 2nd gen Volt spare tire kit comes with a threaded rod that screws into an already existing mounting point under the load floor and sticks up into the trunk area, the spare tire is laid face down on the load floor and a retaining nuts threads onto the threaded rod holding the tire securely in place.

Keith
 

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Good question.
Run Flats are very heavy and rough riding.
Cars need to be designed for them, in order to keep a decent ride quality.
Even then, most people (who have run-flats) ditch them, for non run-flats, and never look back.
Not true. We have been running Bridgestone DriveGuards on my wife's 2015 Volt for over 10K miles and love them. They are better than the stock GY Assurances in every way except range. They are much quieter, handle way better, stop better and have the same ride quality. You do pay a 10% mileage penalty but never have to be worried about a flat tire stranding you.
Well in the case of a 16 Volt, you would be going from a 21 lb tire to a 28 lb tire.
That is as much weight as carying the spare.
However, its worse because that is unsprung weight, which the suspension has to work harder to dampen.
Not the end of the world and probably worth it for peace of mind.

Glad to hear you did not percieve any negative side effects of the heavier tires.
If you were running high pressures on the stock tires, that probably helped you aclimate to the harsher ride of run-flats, which do have much stiffer side walls.
 

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What the heck is that cord from your EVSE?! What make EVSE do you have?! Looks like an air hose.
Ha, looks like the original 2011 EVSE.
 

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Good question.
Run Flats are very heavy and rough riding.
Cars need to be designed for them, in order to keep a decent ride quality.
Even then, most people (who have run-flats) ditch them, for non run-flats, and never look back.
Not true. We have been running Bridgestone DriveGuards on my wife's 2015 Volt for over 10K miles and love them. They are better than the stock GY Assurances in every way except range. They are much quieter, handle way better, stop better and have the same ride quality. You do pay a 10% mileage penalty but never have to be worried about a flat tire stranding you.
Gary, I think you're more exception than the rule. Ride quality is almost always a huge problem with run flats. The rubber is so hard that you feel every bump on the road.

I've had fun flats in my Mini Cooper S. Switching out the run flats for a regular (not run flat) Michelin tires made a world of difference. The ride was exponentially better. And I had the same experience with the BMW 6 series. Everyone who I talk to who had both regular and run flats on the same car, they always prefer the regular tires over the run flats.

Obviously, run flats won't always give you a worse ride than non run flats, especially if you compare a top of the line run flats with an economy non run flats. And not every tire will agree with every car. But generally speaking, all other things being equal, non run flats should give you a better ride than the run flat tires.

More on topic, I prefer to NOT change the tires myself when I get a flat, especially because I live in southern California. I'd much rather press the OnStar button, get the car towed, and have a mechanic work on it. I feel much safer this way. People drive too fast on the highways, the shoulders are much too narrow, and it's just not worth the risk. I've changed the tires about a dozen times in my life, but that was when I lived in the Midwest (20 years ago). Much wider shoulders with people driving at more reasonable speeds.
 

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Ha, looks like the original 2011 EVSE.
Naaa, the 2011 EVSE has a strait cord, his is a "stretchy spiral" like an old school land line telephone cord.
Look like the original "Voltec" L2 EVSE that GM teamed up with SPX to offer: http://www.pluginamerica.org/accessories/gm-voltec-evse

I've got the same one, except a later version with a black cable instead of orange. The coiled cable works well to keep the cable coiled and neat and also allows you to stretch it out over a decent distance when needed.



Edit:

Or could be that one too. :)
 

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Well in the case of a 16 Volt, you would be going from a 21 lb tire to a 28 lb tire.
That is as much weight as carying the spare.
However, its worse because that is unsprung weight, which the suspension has to work harder to dampen.
Not the end of the world and probably worth it for peace of mind.

Glad to hear you did not percieve any negative side effects of the heavier tires.
If you were running high pressures on the stock tires, that probably helped you aclimate to the harsher ride of run-flats, which do have much stiffer side walls.
Compared to the OEM tires the Drive Guards are an improvement except for the loss of range. If I run the tires at high pressure they can be a harsh ride but, not as harsh as the OEM tires were. Run the Drive Guards at 36-39 PSI and they are quite smooth and they do not seem to suffer any significant decrease in range at the lower pressures versus higher pressures. They are grippy and thus the rational for their range decrease. Their alignment has held up very well thus far. I have about 10K on the Drive Guards. I like my space in the back as it is, so the spare would not work for me.

By the way, I had a puncture already in one tire. The only sign of such was that there was a slow leak.....just as much of a leak of pressure that the OEM tires routinely had. They replaced the tire without a fuss.

I would buy them again for the Volt without any reservation. I also got them for roughly the same $$$ that a quality name brand tire would have cost. A win in my books.
 

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Compared to the OEM tires the Drive Guards are an improvement except for the loss of range. If I run the tires at high pressure they can be a harsh ride but, not as harsh as the OEM tires were. Run the Drive Guards at 36-39 PSI and they are quite smooth and they do not seem to suffer any significant decrease in range at the lower pressures versus higher pressures. They are grippy and thus the rational for their range decrease. Their alignment has held up very well thus far. I have about 10K on the Drive Guards. I like my space in the back as it is, so the spare would not work for me.

By the way, I had a puncture already in one tire. The only sign of such was that there was a slow leak.....just as much of a leak of pressure that the OEM tires routinely had. They replaced the tire without a fuss.

I would buy them again for the Volt without any reservation. I also got them for roughly the same $$$ that a quality name brand tire would have cost. A win in my books.
I also have Bridgestone Driveguards on my Volt....swapped out the OEM GYs at 36k miles due to wear and sidewall cracking.

The Driveguards drive better than the GYs...the ride is slightly rougher over larger bumps, but other than that they are fine. I have taken a range hit (probably somewhere around 5 EV miles on a full charge), but I haven't been able to do an apples to apples comparison against my GYs yet.

Almost as a cruel joke, after putting just 300 miles on the Driveguards, I found a nail stuck in one of them. It's a very slow leak, so still haven't gotten around to having it patched/repaired at Costco yet. I'm tempted to deflate it entirely and drive around just to see how it feels.
 
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