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We can only hope. A battery breakthrough is needed. If something like the solid state battery from the University of Texas works, then we will see this happen for sure. Perhaps even faster. Without it we'll have to endure a slog.
 

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It still feels like a glacial pace to me. In 2010 the first Volt was in the wild. 7 years later, I'm still waiting for the perfect PHEV or EV. The Tesla Model S and X are too expensive, the CT6 is too expensive, the Volvo XC90 is too expensive, the Leaf/i3/Focus EV/Golf EV have range anxiety (Leaf getting updated soon), the Bolt is too small, the Model 3 isn't here yet, and nothing else compels me to buy anything anytime soon. I say this multiple times a week - Subyukonade!!!!
 

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We can only hope. A battery breakthrough is needed. If something like the solid state battery from the University of Texas works, then we will see this happen for sure. Perhaps even faster. Without it we'll have to endure a slog.
Samsung might use a solid state battery in a cell phone within 2 years, probably longer for EV (needs more safety testing). They estimate 2025, or second/ third gen EV?
https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.xd...s-for-its-galaxy-phones-within-two-years/amp/
However, I think incremental improvements, not world changing.
 

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In Europe and the U.S., EVs will account for 13% and 12% of electricity demand by 2040. Charging EVs flexibly, when renewables are generating and wholesale prices are low, will help the system adapt to intermittent solar and wind....especially when power companies start to bill like the current Exxon/Mobil...:rolleyes:
 

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is not hard to be considered accelerating when you start from near zero. in use battery technology isn't there yet. sorry but requiring 800 or more pounds of battery to eek out much less than three hundred miles is just bad
 

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It still feels like a glacial pace to me. In 2010 the first Volt was in the wild. 7 years later, I'm still waiting for the perfect PHEV or EV.
You may never find the perfect EV but technological disruption is usually glacial until it isn't. What I mean is that you naturally think the changeover will be gradual -- kinda like the chart in the article shows -- but what happens is very little and then a lot. Think of a dam giving way rather than water pouring over a spillway.

In the meantime, yes it does seem glacial. LOL
 

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You may never find the perfect EV but technological disruption is usually glacial until it isn't. What I mean is that you naturally think the changeover will be gradual -- kinda like the chart in the article shows -- but what happens is very little and then a lot. Think of a dam giving way rather than water pouring over a spillway.

In the meantime, yes it does seem glacial. LOL
The perfect EV to me is simple. A Voltec Equinox with 60 miles of EV range for $40-45K would do it. I still don't understand why GM won't sell different sized batteries to give folks a choice like Tesla does. For example, urban dwellers might be fine with a 30 mile battery where commuting warriors might wasn't a 60 or 90 mile battery. Allowing the car to be upgradable at the dealership for the difference in cost would be a real welcome option, so I could buy a used car with a 30 mile battery and upgrade it later.
 

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You may never find the perfect EV but technological disruption is usually glacial until it isn't. What I mean is that you naturally think the changeover will be gradual -- kinda like the chart in the article shows -- but what happens is very little and then a lot. Think of a dam giving way rather than water pouring over a spillway.

In the meantime, yes it does seem glacial. LOL
Batteries have been in use before petroleum was discovered. Remember Alessandro Volta, the guy who discovered the chemical cell or "pile"? Many here are believing that electrochemical development moves as fast as computer technology. It doesn't! So take your time and wait if you want better batteries, or put up your own money and start up a lab.

Thomas Edison did this and created his own brand of nickel-iron cells and batteries that have lasted over a hundred years. Most of the first EVs used his technology and are still operational. All they need is a recharge and they can run again, but due to modern safety laws, these old EVs can only run on private roads and in classic car shows. The nickel-iron cell's only limitation is the small cell voltage (1.2 VDC versus Li-ion 3.7 VDC), but are safer and longer lasting.

Read more about them here, and you can buy modern versions, too:
http://www.earthineer.com/blog/29533/the-idiot-edison-battery-diy
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nickel–iron_battery
"Over a century ago, Thomas Edison found a battery design that he considered to be nearly perfect. Today, Iron Edison is proud to offer an updated version of this incredible design that is specifically manufactured for Renewable Energy systems."
https://ironedison.com/
 
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