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While my past two "big money" jobs were in the oil and gas business (Petroleum Landman and MWD Specialist) I can quite honestly say gasoline can shoot back to $4 a gallon for all I care... even with my long commutes (70 miles a day) I'm still only having to gas up every 4 to 5 weeks and its only 9 gallons in the Gen2 :)

I was a bit sad when I took delivery of my 2017 a few months ago and gas prices dipped to around $1.70 here in n. texas... to the point where I'm seeing way more bigass hummers on the road. I'm well insulated from any gas price hikes with my volt though, bring it on!

Funny enough the same people who were dumb enough to think cheap gas was here forever, and went out and bought the suburbans and hummers... will be the first on TV whining and crying how they can't afford to pay their bills again because of gas.
 

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It isn't going to rise enough to make a huge difference. But these low gas prices also aren't going to stop rising sales of BEVs as the long-range models hit the market, and it's not going to stop governments from continuing their support for plug-ins and improved fuel economy standards (even if the USA shifts its approach to more footprint-based fuel economy).
 

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It means that the fracking boom will be resumed in the US until they reached some sort of balance in the world price. So the rise in prices may not be like before but attenuated.
 

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I've been from $0.79/gallon all the way to $5.01/gallon.
It's been an interesting ride for sure.
When I first started driving in 1968, oil companies were dumping gasoline in the Kansas City market. I was told at the time it was because refineries were making JetA and gasoline was a by-product. It was at 19.9c/gal for years. Which was basically all taxes.

And then 1973 happened.
 

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In practice, Saudi has little clout to enforce pumping goals. They also have zero influence on shale and already-built non-OPEC infrastructure.

When the price went up to >$100, OPEC couldn't control it because they ran out of ability to pump more and lower the price.

Rational pricing is the key. If they keep the price too high, we will find a way to not use their oil!

P.S. I already did!
 

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I wish I remembered where to find it, but someone put together an infographic that displayed all of the costs of producing a barrel of oil. Shale, fracking, tar sands, etc. don't really become cost effective until oil gets past $70 a barrel.
 

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I wish I remembered where to find it, but someone put together an infographic that displayed all of the costs of producing a barrel of oil. Shale, fracking, tar sands, etc. don't really become cost effective until oil gets past $70 a barrel.
Dated information. "Experts" I keep hearing on CNBC quote much lower numbers. The US is still producing a lot of oil even after several years of low prices.
 

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Dated information. "Experts" I keep hearing on CNBC quote much lower numbers. The US is still producing a lot of oil even after several years of low prices.
Ya, with the new fracking technology, shale oils is probably closer to $50/barrel. Tar sands and some other difficult oils are around $100/barrel.
 
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