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They're turning it back on after an eval period. Seems reasonable to me. OTA updates for the win.
Except when they neuter features customers PAID for upfront. This isn't some free beta test willing customers signed up for. It's a feature people paid cold hard cash for that got deactivated overnight (and never really worked well to begin with).
 

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Another example of Tesla using customers - and all those with whom they share the road - as guinea pigs. I am not looking forward to sharing the road with their "autonomous" trucks.

KNS
 

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It is hard to believe that the company with the most advanced autopilot technology is having trouble with AEB. However, good for them that they can detect this issue through live data from it's customer fleet, and can both put it in safe mode quickly, and most likely eventually deploy the fix with no real disruption to customers.

If this were a legacy company, they would have learned about it only after numerous customers had experienced accidents, and probably would have denied the problem hoping to avoid a costly recall.
 

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After reading the article, it seems they built the system on the production line, and now they're testing it to see if it works correctly. I'm glad Boeing doesn't operate this way.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
After reading the article, it seems they built the system on the production line, and now they're testing it to see if it works correctly. I'm glad Boeing doesn't operate this way.
Or car companies. (Tesla is an Energy Company).

"Joe? We could save a lot money using cardboard brake rotors."
"OK, ship 10,000 cars with them, and see how many end up at the body shop or junkyards."
...
"Joe, the first 5,000 are already in the junkyard."
"OK, recall the last 5,000 and put double wall cardboard in them..."
 

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It is hard to believe that the company with the most advanced autopilot technology is having trouble with AEB.
They don't actually have the most advanced autopilot technology. They have a higher risk tolerance and clientele willing pay for the privilege of participating in public beta testing.

That may allow Tesla to someday develop the most advanced technology, but for now the legacy automakers and their suppliers still have the best technology available.
 

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After reading the article, it seems they built the system on the production line, and now they're testing it to see if it works correctly. I'm glad Boeing doesn't operate this way.
...except for the Boeing 787 fiasco with the lithium batteries catching fire in flight.
 

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Another example of Tesla using customers - and all those with whom they share the road - as guinea pigs. I am not looking forward to sharing the road with their "autonomous" trucks.

KNS
That was my first thought.

They have a higher risk tolerance and clientele willing pay for the privilege of participating in public beta testing.
That's about the best spin I could put on this, if I were to spin it.
 

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This paragraph from the article is particularly hilarious:

"We recently introduced some minor hardware changes to the Autopilot system in new cars, and we are now in the process of robustly validating the new hardware using real-world driving data,” a Tesla spokeswoman said in a statement Sunday afternoon. “During that process, Automatic Emergency Braking will temporarily be inactive and will instead be in shadow mode, which means it will register how the feature would perform if it were activated, without taking any action. This temporary calibration period is standard Tesla protocol and is done out of an abundance of caution.

If Tesla was really interested in implementing features as safely as possible (oodles of caution), wouldn't they do thorough in-house testing BEFORE any customer vehicles hit the road with these "updated" features? It's one thing if these AP2.5 cars were launched with AEB in "shadow mode" from the beginning, but to release the vehicles with AEB active, THEN disable it via OTA months later is really an amateur move.

Low level Tesla engineer to boss: Umm.....I *think* AEB is good to go, but we should really log some miles with in-house testing vehicles so we make sure AEB performs as it should.
Boss: HEY! Elon set a deadline, so we gotta stick to that deadline no matter what! Is AEB ready or not?? Remember, our future job security depends on sticking to master Elon's timelines.
Low level engineer: Uhhh.........yeah, sure, it's ready to go live! *fingers crossed behind back*
 

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Discussion Starter #13
This paragraph from the article is particularly hilarious:

"We recently introduced some minor hardware changes to the Autopilot system in new cars, and we are now in the process of robustly validating the new hardware using real-world driving data,” a Tesla spokeswoman said in a statement Sunday afternoon. “During that process, Automatic Emergency Braking will temporarily be inactive and will instead be in shadow mode, which means it will register how the feature would perform if it were activated, without taking any action. This temporary calibration period is standard Tesla protocol and is done out of an abundance of caution.

If Tesla was really interested in implementing features as safely as possible (oodles of caution), wouldn't they do thorough in-house testing BEFORE any customer vehicles hit the road with these "updated" features? It's one thing if these AP2.5 cars were launched with AEB in "shadow mode" from the beginning, but to release the vehicles with AEB active, THEN disable it via OTA months later is really an amateur move.
Yeah I saw that too. But Tesla generates so much fog in their PR Dept, I just ignored it.

Luckily it wasn't the headlights or electric steering motor they needed to Robustly Validate. That would have sucked.

GM puts literally millions of test miles on cars before features make it to the public.

It's probably why the Bolt EV did not ship with ACC. They were not 110% ready for release.
 
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