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Discussion Starter #1
Tesla Motors solves transmission problem without sacrificing low end acceleration and high top speed:

Link

They did a few things to achieve this:

1) Went to a single gear, which straddled the ratios of their previous two-speed transmision

2) Increased the current to the motor (without drawing more charge from the battery)

3) Increased (developed) the upper limit of rpm's the motor would turn

4) Beefed up many components and sub-systems to handle additional torque

The vehicle now has an excellent quarter mile time, due to the elimination of a gear shift, while actually increasing its range.
 

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Reading some of the linked info above gives me a real appreciation for the amazing complexity in automotive design. Thanks for posting this, Jason.
 

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You're welcome. Fortunately for Tesla Motors, they were able to design their vehicle based on the Lotus Elise, using Lotus Engineering support. This allowed Tesla Motors to concentrate on the electric power / drivetrain systems. They assumed they only needed to focus on the battery pack and motor, and the transmission ended up the Achilles heel. Traction and handling was another enormous project:

Link

Motor control also was difficult, given all the different loads:

Link2
 

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I'm halfway surprised many haven't criticized the Roadster as a conversion. I know the body is technically different from the Elise, but it isn't a wholly new idea. Don't get me wrong, I think it's an incredible concept that has spurred creativity in the industry.

But really, we're seeing conversions all over the place. Like the Sky conversion out of Cincinnati (AMP something-or-other)...that is classified as a conversion. The Roadster is not, although Lotus designed it. Odd IMO.
 

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This is one of the more positive signs I've seen from them lately. I'm releived they appear to be making some "traction". The upgraded IGBT's struck me as a nice little example of how EV's are on a steep part of their development curve. There are so many areas that they can be incrementally improved once "real" production is inevitable.
 

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This is one of the more positive signs I've seen from them lately. I'm releived they appear to be making some "traction". The upgraded IGBT's struck me as a nice little example of how EV's are on a steep part of their development curve. There are so many areas that they can be incrementally improved once "real" production is inevitable.

Agreed. All that is needed now is quick-charge capable batteries and the BEVs will become one of the best solutions for personal transportation. The wall plug-to-wheel efficiencies are just so high and only getting better. I just don't see how people can still think Hydrogen will beat this. My answer it that it can't.
 

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Agreed. All that is needed now is quick-charge capable batteries and the BEVs will become one of the best solutions for personal transportation. The wall plug-to-wheel efficiencies are just so high and only getting better. I just don't see how people can still think Hydrogen will beat this. My answer it that it can't.
Hydrogen beats the existing batteries in rapid refill. You can keep invoking the "quick-charge" battery wish, but, other than some lab test reports, they don't exist. The fuel cell Equinox is in customer trials right now.
 

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Hydrogen beats the existing batteries in rapid refill. You can keep invoking the "quick-charge" battery wish, but, other than some lab test reports, they don't exist. The fuel cell Equinox is in customer trials right now.
Oh does hydrogen really beat batteries? The last time I checked you can't buy a hydrogen car or go to a hydrogen station to fill it up. Toshiba will soon be actually selling their batteries. Maybe a few months late but you act as though they do not even exist! Battery technology is much further along than hydrogen technology. Honda's car is rumored to cost $200,000 and only 100 are going to customers. Why do you think this is ready for mass production? Even if the car was ready there are no hydrogen stations (the 5 test stations don't count). You refuse to face facts that either battery quick-charge stations or hydrogen refill station infrastructure is many years away. In five years we will pull these posts out and all get a good laugh. We will probably be driving cow manure powered cars. Read on:




"Toshiba will begin selling the SCiB quick charge-10 year battery in March, 2008. This industrial battery increases safety, versatility in power source and qualifies as environmentally sensitive.

Toshiba has developed a battery that can be recharged in five minutes with a lifespan of 10 years. Toshiba has trademarked the new accumulator, the SCiB. The new quick charge-Super Charge ion Battery will go to market in March, 2008. Initially, the SCiB distribution will focus on the industrial equipment sector. "
 

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Honda's car is rumored to cost $200,000 and only 100 are going to customers. Why do you think this is ready for mass production?
If you only build in quantities of 100, then of course the per unit cost is going to be $200,000. GM is planning on a 10,000 unit run to get the Volt down to $35,000, so Honda will have to do the same.

South Carolina, of all places, is looking to be a leading state in hydrogen vehicle propulsion systems, starting with hydrogen ICE vehicles, to force the build-out of the hydrogen infrastructure. When fuel cell vehicles become available for lease or purchase, South Carolina will be ready.
 

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OK for argument sake lets say GM or whoever has a hygrogen powered vehicle for 35K and lets assume there are hydrogen refueling station already built to supply the hydrogen. Where will the hydrogen come from (oil?) and how much will it cost to drive 40 miles on hydrogen.
 

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OK for argument sake lets say GM or whoever has a hygrogen powered vehicle for 35K and lets assume there are hydrogen refueling station already built to supply the hydrogen. Where will the hydrogen come from (oil?) and how much will it cost to drive 40 miles on hydrogen.
Wiki has good writeups on all the methods and estimated prices for various means of generation hydrogen from water:

Link

Remember, just as with the cost of goods at 7/11, hydrogen may be slightly more expensive than alternatives for the energy itself, but you are buying the convenience of rapid refill. Also, don't forget how expensive batteries are, if you choose to carry 200+ miles worth of batteries.
 
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