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Hello fellow Volt owners:

I was a little disappointed in the Model 3 after visiting the Tesla dealership for the second time. The price for the all wheel drive (the only other model is a rear wheel), was $65,000.00. It boasts a 310 mile range but you use between 20% to 30% of your mileage in below 30 degree cold with the heater on. I also fear two items. One; is the long range viability of the company. Two; What if Tesla decides to raise the rates on their super charger network or worse yet goes belly up and the Super Charge network closes down. You are then stuck with a car that you cannot travel far with.

I love my Volt. It is a blue 2016 and my second one. I purchased this one. I have no range anxiety. In the cold my ICE kicks in. I do not use my Volt for long distance travel so I try to stay on electric all the time. I still feel it is a trick car.

I will watch Tesla over the next year to see what develops.

Big Moe
 

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Even if Tesla raises the cost of using the Supercharger (price for Supercharging varies by location) it will probably still be much cheaper than gas. Using the Supercharger will always be more expensive than charging at home unless your Tesla comes with free lifetime super charging. Since you state you rarely drive beyond your Volt's EV range is the cost of using Tesla's Supercharger even a consideration?

I have visited the Tesla store and explored the Model 3. It is a a lot more car than a Gen 2 Volt but also about twice the price of a Volt. I am interested in the Model Y whenever Tesla decides to build that one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi it’s Moe

One of the reasons I’m interested in the super charger is I live in NJ and I travel to Annapolis weekly. I live on my sailboat half the year. I would like to ditch my Yukon and my Volt and buy a Tesla Model 3. I’m a little skeptical about the life of the Tesla company
 

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Hi it’s Moe

One of the reasons I’m interested in the super charger is I live in NJ and I travel to Annapolis weekly. I live on my sailboat half the year. I would like to ditch my Yukon and my Volt and buy a Tesla Model 3. I’m a little skeptical about the life of the Tesla company
Should be sorted out in a year or so. Aren't there adapters so you can use other types of chargers? If Tesla goes under the car will still work. I drive a 38 year old car of a company that has been out of business for 34 years.
 

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I'm not too worried about Tesla "going under" anytime soon. They are certainly having growing pains right now though.

As far as DC fast charging goes, if anything they could eventually sell off the Supercharger system. With so many Teslas around to service, and all the choice locations, there would be many buyers. Again I don't see this happening any time soon. Also as an alternative, Tesla has a CHAdeMO adapter for the S and X. It is supposed to work with the -3 real soon. Of course you can always fall back on J-1772 and Destination charging up to 11.5 kW.

Voorhees NJ to Annapolis is only 135 miles. You could do the round trip in a -3LR without problem. Though I guess in the winter time it might be a little tighter.
 

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One; is the long range viability of the company.
I think that is a concern, but practically speaking, I don't think it would be much of an issue for the car. It's already popular enough that you will have garage mechanic support for the Model 3 even if Tesla completely folds.

Two; What if Tesla decides to raise the rates on their super charger network or worse yet goes belly up and the Super Charge network closes down. You are then stuck with a car that you cannot travel far with.
I also don't think that will be an issue. While it's true that Tesla is currently mismanaging the Supercharger Network as an asset (using it as a moat rather than a means of generating additional revenue), even if they go belly up, someone will take over the network. They would possibly open it to all EVs (the smart move from a revenue perspective), but they wouldn't simply scrap the network.

As far as price is concerned, yes, you are almost wholly dependent on Tesla for your long-range fueling needs. However, it's never likely to cost anything close to what it would cost to travel in an ICE vehicle. Hopefully, they get an adapter working that gives Model 3 owners additional options, but I doubt you'd ever need it.
 

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This post leaves me very confused. Tesla doesn't have dealerships - that's another thing they are doing that's at least as radical as the cars themselves: they sell and service the cars directly, which has big benefits and some drawbacks and has created a lot of additional enemies for them that are changing laws to block sales in some states.

It's possible to make a $65,000 AWD Model 3, if you add almost all the options to the car that starts at $54k without a $1k destination fee.

$64/65k is the base price for the Performance model, though - Tesla's faster answer to the BMW M3.
 

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I drive a 38 year old car of a company that has been out of business for 34 years.
Most U.S. brands have third-party remanufacturing (OEM = Other Equipment Manufacturer) so you can buy parts for very old models where the brand has disappeared. I truly doubt Tesla has made any planning to allow a third party OEM to make parts for the Roadster yet, or for any models still in production. There is an OEM that makes parts for the DeLorean DMC-12.
 

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I think that is a concern, but practically speaking, I don't think it would be much of an issue for the car. It's already popular enough that you will have garage mechanic support for the Model 3 even if Tesla completely folds.

Hopefully, they get an adapter working that gives Model 3 owners additional options, but I doubt you'd ever need it.
Mechanical support is easy, just get the correct tools. Parts are another problem. See my previous post.

As for an adapter, there is one so the Tesla cars can all use any SAE J1772 Level 2 EVSE to plug in. I believe there is an adapter that works with the DCFC stations, too.
 

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Tesla is unlikely to go out of business with backers like Panasonic and huge financial investments from the likes of Fidelity. It also outsold Mercedes cars in the US last month.

Even if it does, your car will be fine. Saab bit the dust recently and parts are still available.

I think there will be third party superchargers soon, there are in China now and they even have mobile service. If not you still have access to L2 chargers with the adapter.
 

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I can't find a replacement battery for my 10 year old laptop made in far larger numbers than any Tesla to date. Unlike the Volt/Bolt where a (very careful) "some guy" 20 years in the future could bolt together a functional replacement battery pack out of junkyard parts, the Bazillion cell Tesla packs are essentially unrepairable. If Tesla goes under or simply decides to end support on old models (that's the Silicon Valley mentality) owners could be SOL in the not-that-distant future.
 

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I can't find a replacement battery for my 10 year old laptop made in far larger numbers than any Tesla to date. Unlike the Volt/Bolt where a (very careful) "some guy" 20 years in the future could bolt together a functional replacement battery pack out of junkyard parts, the Bazillion cell Tesla packs are essentially unrepairable. If Tesla goes under or simply decides to end support on old models (that's the Silicon Valley mentality) owners could be SOL in the not-that-distant future.
You can get batteries for anything from Hong Kong. With car and battery production starting in China by 2020 (Elon's prediction) you should be able to pick them up on eBay in ten years, at least the Chinese knock offs and probably free shipping as well. The way things are going you may have to have it delivered to Canada and smuggle it across the border..
 

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Most U.S. brands have third-party remanufacturing (OEM = Other Equipment Manufacturer) so you can buy parts for very old models where the brand has disappeared. I truly doubt Tesla has made any planning to allow a third party OEM to make parts for the Roadster yet, or for any models still in production. There is an OEM that makes parts for the DeLorean DMC-12.
The O in OEM = Original. OEM = Original Equipment Manufacturer. You are describing the aftermarket manufacturers, which will make parts available as long as demand exists. 3rd party remanufactured parts, such as battery arrays for Tesla models, will be the only option in a short period once/if Tesla folds. The only option for older vehicles that are out of production will be the same as today: standardized or universalized parts. Some will require minimal or significant modification to adapt.
 

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I can't find a replacement battery for my 10 year old laptop made in far larger numbers than any Tesla to date. Unlike the Volt/Bolt where a (very careful) "some guy" 20 years in the future could bolt together a functional replacement battery pack out of junkyard parts, the Bazillion cell Tesla packs are essentially unrepairable. If Tesla goes under or simply decides to end support on old models (that's the Silicon Valley mentality) owners could be SOL in the not-that-distant future.
What gives you that idea?

The S/X packs are made up of 16 identical modules (14 for small packs,) which can be easily swapped out with a little care (as I understand it, the hardest part is pulling open the upper pack skin and getting it back down again.

Whereas the Volt uses four modules, which are not interchangeable - you need the correct one of the four, since they have different lengths/numbers of cells. I'm not sure how the Bolt is set up internally.
 

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What gives you that idea?

The S/X packs are made up of 16 identical modules (14 for small packs,) which can be easily swapped out with a little care (as I understand it, the hardest part is pulling open the upper pack skin and getting it back down again.

Whereas the Volt uses four modules, which are not interchangeable - you need the correct one of the four, since they have different lengths/numbers of cells. I'm not sure how the Bolt is set up internally.
On top of that, Model S/X packs are produced at much higher quantities compared to a specific model laptop battery. It's also one of the advantages to having a smaller product lineup. For example, I can easily find a replacement battery for my 2012 Macbook Air, however a 2012 Dell laptop from the same era is pretty much screwed. Apple only sells three laptop options (Macbook, Macbook Air, Macbook Pro), while Dell sells hundreds of different models. There's much better aftermarket support when manufactures can guarantee that their parts will fit the majority.
 

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You can get batteries for anything from Hong Kong. With car and battery production starting in China by 2020 (Elon's prediction) you should be able to pick them up on eBay in ten years, at least the Chinese knock offs and probably free shipping as well. The way things are going you may have to have it delivered to Canada and smuggle it across the border..
You could get a little unexpected warmth coming through the seats from the Chinese batteries ;)
 

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This post leaves me very confused. Tesla doesn't have dealerships - that's another thing they are doing that's at least as radical as the cars themselves: they sell and service the cars directly, which has big benefits and some drawbacks and has created a lot of additional enemies for them that are changing laws to block sales in some states.

It's possible to make a $65,000 AWD Model 3, if you add almost all the options to the car that starts at $54k without a $1k destination fee.

$64/65k is the base price for the Performance model, though - Tesla's faster answer to the BMW M3.
Tesla might not call their sales facilities "dealerships" but they do operate much the same. If you inquire about a car, they will try to get your phone and email, and will contact you if you don't buy on the spot. They will try to upsell you (they do get commission).

The only thing missing is the opportunity to negotiate pricing, but they do have promotions that come and go.

The AWD edition is a good value, but yes, with paint, and AP, the price is up there, and it's not a luxury car. You can't even order things like HUD, 360° view, A/C seating, etc.

Whether the $65k Performance model will be competitive with the 3.4s RWD, 1.04g, $63k Camaro ZL1 will have to be seen. I'm guessing nothing Tesla sells will be competitive or as nimble. In particular, the brakes, lateral g's, control, and traps speeds won't be there. The Teslas might be quicker in a straight line at certain speeds, but anything past 75mph is not going to be there. The ZL1 cannot put down 100% power until then.

The 2018 BMW M3 CS @ $99k won't come close to catching a base ZL1, and will get pummeled by the performance version (ZL1 1LE). But I will be surprised if anything Tesla sells will catch any 2018 M3.
 

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You could get a little unexpected warmth coming through the seats from the Chinese batteries ;)
That would be good for those cold climes, heated seats for nothing. :)
 
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