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Does anyone know how long the batteries in the TPMS sensors last? Should they be changed out at tire replacement time? Mine seem to be a little less accurate than they were when new.

I think new sensors are about $40 each, so they are not cheap.

Thanks to all who respond.
 

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Does anyone know how long the batteries in the TPMS sensors last? Should they be changed out at tire replacement time? Mine seem to be a little less accurate than they were when new.

I think new sensors are about $40 each, so they are not cheap.

Thanks to all who respond.
The consensus is that the current generation of TPMS should last 7 years or longer so replacing the batteries or the TPMS any sooner would be a waste of time and money. One thing I learned on the forum is that the TPMS will conserve battery power, only actively send data to the vehicle if the TPMS senses a sudden change in pressure or after the vehicle has been driven for ~ 2 miles.
 

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The consensus is that the current generation of TPMS should last 7 years or longer so replacing the batteries or the TPMS any sooner would be a waste of time and money. One thing I learned on the forum is that the TPMS will conserve battery power, only actively send data to the vehicle if the TPMS senses a sudden change in pressure or after the vehicle has been driven for ~ 2 miles.
How can it tell how far it's gone?
 

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I asked Discount Tire while getting a nail hole in my Bolt tire repaired. He said 9-12 years is what they see.

Also, the sensors can be replaced without removing the tire.
 

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How can it tell how far it's gone?
Number of wheel rotations maybe, else it could be that is how far you typically need to drive before the tires warm enough that the tire pressure increase triggers the TPMS to send data to the vehicle. This explains why in the Volt Owner's Manual it states that to get an accurate reading from the TPMS you need to drive the vehicle for approx. 2 miles.
 

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Number of wheel rotations maybe, else it could be that is how far you typically need to drive before the tires warm enough that the tire pressure increase triggers the TPMS to send data to the vehicle. This explains why in the Volt Owner's Manual it states that to get an accurate reading from the TPMS you need to drive the vehicle for approx. 2 miles.
It just seems easier to have it check for "am I moving?" over intervals and if it gets "yes" like three times in a row, wake up enough to start broadcasting pressure, and fall back asleep again if it gets "no" a number of times in a row as well. Which would make it a time interval of driving, not a distance.
 

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It just seems easier to have it check for "am I moving?" over intervals and if it gets "yes" like three times in a row, wake up enough to start broadcasting pressure, and fall back asleep again if it gets "no" a number of times in a row as well. Which would make it a time interval of driving, not a distance.
The TPMS also wakes up if you add or remove some air from the tire.
 

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They don't seem to be very accurate. I noticed they were quite uneven (two tires being outside of what I feel comfortable with) before I started on a longer drive. Checked with tire gauge and they were pretty much the same all round. Have to keep an eye on it so I know where they are at.
 

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They don't seem to be very accurate. I noticed they were quite uneven (two tires being outside of what I feel comfortable with) before I started on a longer drive. Checked with tire gauge and they were pretty much the same all round. Have to keep an eye on it so I know where they are at.
That's why the Volt Owner's Manual states that you need to drive the vehicle for up to 2 miles before the TPMS will provide an updated, more accurate reading.
 

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Everything I have come across cites the 5-7 years number.
For myself I have found my TPMS sensors to be extremely consistent if not terribly accurate. What I mean by that is when I check my tires with a good quality dial-type tire gauge, I get the following results;

TPMS #1 - Consistently agrees with the tire gauge
TPMS #2 - Consistently agrees with the tire gauge
TPMS #3 - Consistently reads 2lb less than the tire gauge
TPMS #4 - Consistently reads 1lb more than the tire gauge

This has remained exactly the same for the entire ownership of the vehicle to date.

As a result, I just know what to expect and don't worry about it even though it annoys my OCD (LOL)
 

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For myself I have found my TPMS sensors to be extremely consistent if not terribly accurate.
Concur. What the number on the dash reads is far less important than it not change much unexpectedly or not in line with the rest of the wheels. All four wheels down two PSI overnight? Normal. Only one wheel lost 5 PSI in two days? Problem.
 
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