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Imagine what we could do with all the money our government wastes on pointless conquests, lining corporations with money, and actually use our tax dollars for something that helps the people.
 

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Many well thought out pieces to make the community self sustaining. Love the mix use between homes, farming and in an area the world where potable water is scarce with the use of grey and black water. Love the fact that is in area of the world known more for pumping oil from the ground, although UAE has limited oil resources.

Thanks for sharing.
 

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I kind of expected someone in California to implement something like this, but I guess there's money in Dubai. One thing that is missing is that this is more of a neighborhood, not a city. There are no shops or grocery stores or businesses that I could see, only a convention center. I'd love to see us up this a notch, make an entire city where EVs can drive, but if you have an ICE, you have to park outside the city (like at Disneyland) and take public transportation to get in.

Some unanswered questions are what happens to the food that they grow? Do they sell it or do the community members eat it? What happens if you are a meat eater and not a vegetarian? I'm guessing people still bring in outside purchases and depend on the regular economies of a city to buy meat and furniture.
 

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I kind of expected someone in California to implement something like this, but I guess there's money in Dubai. One thing that is missing is that this is more of a neighborhood, not a city. There are no shops or grocery stores or businesses that I could see, only a convention center. I'd love to see us up this a notch, make an entire city where EVs can drive, but if you have an ICE, you have to park outside the city (like at Disneyland) and take public transportation to get in.

Some unanswered questions are what happens to the food that they grow? Do they sell it or do the community members eat it? What happens if you are a meat eater and not a vegetarian? I'm guessing people still bring in outside purchases and depend on the regular economies of a city to buy meat and furniture.
Dubai does have money. So does the US. But the money Dubai has is put towards the betterment of its citizens. That's the difference. Not to say there aren't problems there or I'm a fan of the place. But there is absolutely no respect or regard for Americans by its own country anymore. We, ourselves, are mostly to blame.

I agree there are unanswered questions and always improvements. But as a first attempt, it's absolutely fantastic and nothing comes close in this scale.

I assume there may be a program that the city offers to its residents to either have food brought in or there may be a food/shopping centre that wasn't mentioned.
 

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It was a nice video. Dubai has similar weather to Phoenix. They were wise to film during the coolest month of the year or those two men would have been sweating a lot and all those a/c units would have been running non-stop.

They did mention that residents prefer to drive large gas guzzlers. It may be that fuel prices are low there. then they said that to motivate them to buy electric cars, they are offered a $14,000 subsidy.

A comment was posted below the youtube video asking to have something like this built in Arizona. Well it was, back in 1970. Arcosanti https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arcosanti was meant to be a new type of town, just like the town in Dubai. It never really worked out. People had different needs and not everyone wants to live in a commune. Parents eventually decided to ask outside schools to send buses in to take their kids to nearby towns to be educated. Other set-backs resulted in the place being mostly a place for tourists to visit, not a place to live.

In the late 1990's, The Grand Canyon was developing some plans to remove gas powered vehicles and install electric buses and trains that could bring visitors in from nearby Tusayan. I took part, helping do surveys to get a feel what visitors would be willing to do. CVIP, the visitors center, was where trains would drop people. It is walking distance from Mather Point, a popular viewing area. The first electric buses were German made. I rode one on my way to the Bright Angel Trail Head. I talked to the driver, asking him why he was driving so slow and backing up so many other cars on the road. He said the buses cost over $250,000 each and were useless when below 50% charge. They would only go 5-10 mph up grades when the battery was below 50% charge. The visitors center also had plans to rent bicycles for people to use to get around the village. Paved trails were constructed for hikers and bikes to connect from hotels to shops and to the rim of the Canyon.

It was a total failure. The average time a tourist spends at the Grand Canyon was something like 19 minutes. They just want to drive in, park next to the rim, take some pictures, and head back out to the interstate highway and continue on their way to Disneyland or Sea World in California. The park purposely did not construct parking for car, so people just pulled over and parked along the road near the rim, causing all sorts of traffic problems. Half of the reliable buses were loud and dirty diesel buses. They did buy many new CNG fueled buses that were very quiet. The trains and tracks were never built. Nobody wanted to use them and nobody would have used them. The Grand Canyon gets 4.5-5 million visitors a year and if they are going to drive 1000 miles from Kansas or Texas or even further, they are not going to park their cars outside the park and ride a train the last five miles to see the Canyon. In Zion National Park, they mostly do, but not at The Grand Canyon.

One last story is about the Biosphere, near Tucson. It was where scientists lived for an entire year without outside assistance, growing their own crops to eat. It also turned out to be a failure, and the scientists would regularly call to have pizzas delivered to them. Now it is called Biosphere II and I believe it is sponsored by University of Arizona, or owned by them.

It's hard to change the way people live. It's worth trying to get people to go solar and to drive electric cars. I walk the dogs along a parkway each day and for every 100 cars that pass by, I see either no electric cars or maybe one. Most are work trucks and vans and SUV's. Realistically, a goal to get 5% of drivers into Volts or Bolts would be an amazing achievement. And solar, in place like Arizona where the sun shines a lot, makes sense. But if you aim too high, and you attempt to force people to do something they refuse to do, you will spend a lot of money and be forced to subsidize your dream town, to make it work.
 
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