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Discussion Starter #1
Surprise! Texas clean energy leader

As we’ve said before, because of its abundance of natural gas, sunshine and wind power, Texas is uniquely poised to meet the Clean Power Plan’s standards. That also means that should those Environmental Protection Agency regulations fall by the judicial wayside, Texas is still poised to dramatically improve its emissions. State leaders don’t have to do anything other than let old coal power plants retire.
Note: That's exactly what my utility, CPSEnergy, is doing - retiring their older coal-fired plants.
 

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Most Texas residential energy plans have an option for renewable energy exclusively. You can buy wind power, for example, over the grid.

This is why I would never put PV solar on my roof. It is not economically viable compared to current grid pricing.

Texas is having a boom in new business due to competitive energy costs. Housing is becoming way more costly as a result of the influx of businesses and people.

ERCOT.com Electric Reliability Council of Texas reported several peak day usage records this year with no impact to electric service. ERCOT has authority to reduce peak usage (by rolling blackouts or other methods) to keep the grid alive.
 

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Most Texas residential energy plans have an option for renewable energy exclusively. You can buy wind power, for example, over the grid.

This is why I would never put PV solar on my roof. It is not economically viable compared to current grid pricing.

Texas is having a boom in new business due to competitive energy costs. Housing is becoming way more costly as a result of the influx of businesses and people.

ERCOT.com Electric Reliability Council of Texas reported several peak day usage records this year with no impact to electric service. ERCOT has authority to reduce peak usage (by rolling blackouts or other methods) to keep the grid alive.
DFW resident here as well -- and as much as I'd love to put a solar array on my roof and a nice sized battery storage system, just doesn't make sense. I locked in a 2 year electric rate of 8.8 cents... (still 1 year before I can renew) and prices have dropped even lower. I saw long term contracts for 7.5 cents per kwh with no fees :) Hope the pricing lasts another years so I can re-up :)
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Most Texas residential energy plans have an option for renewable energy exclusively. You can buy wind power, for example, over the grid.

This is why I would never put PV solar on my roof. It is not economically viable compared to current grid pricing.

Texas is having a boom in new business due to competitive energy costs. Housing is becoming way more costly as a result of the influx of businesses and people.

ERCOT.com Electric Reliability Council of Texas reported several peak day usage records this year with no impact to electric service. ERCOT has authority to reduce peak usage (by rolling blackouts or other methods) to keep the grid alive.
To your edit, CPSEnergy, San Antonio's provider, is often a net exporter to the grid during peak loads. They have a program in place (which I participate in) to dial back residential thermostats by 4*F during what they call "Conservation Events" to help them stay under demand - and reduce the need for bringing their peakers online. What they get in revenue from selling to ERCOT helps to keep our rates low since buying from ERCOT is expensive to utilities.

On wind power, I can't see myself buying into their program for the sake of thumping my chest that "I'm Green" in some way.

https://www.cpsenergy.com/en/about-us/programs-services/energy-generation/wind/windtricity.html
From the link above:
Windtricity − wind power from West Texas and the Texas coast − is slightly more than conventional electricity, but every kilowatt of wind you purchase supports the continued development of renewable power.
I couldn't locate the exact premium difference, but I think I remember it being like 3 cents/kWh a few years ago. I've seen the West Texas and coastal wind farms. They're impressive but I'll wait for the rate differential to come down more before I'll take a shine to utilizing them directly on my bill. They're already "in the mix" of what we pay already.

San Antonio does, however, uses "Windtricity" to charge its electric bus fleet. I have no idea what rate they charge themselves for it.

Note: CPSEnergy is wholly-owned by the City of San Antonio.
 
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