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I did a quick search and pulled a thread on lightning strikes causing a surge, but I was wondering about a "normal" electrical surge and whether L2 EVSEs, particularly CC, protect against that. We all have the cars plugged in for hours at a time and I haven't seen any reports of issues due to electrical surges, changes in current.

Is there something in the EVSE that moderates current flow and/or protects against surges?

I also wonder whether the supplied 110 cord has any surge protection as well. Does anyone plug the 110 cord into a surge protector vs. plugging directly into an outlet?
 

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I did a quick search and pulled a thread on lightning strikes causing a surge, but I was wondering about a "normal" electrical surge and whether L2 EVSEs, particularly CC, protect against that. We all have the cars plugged in for hours at a time and I haven't seen any reports of issues due to electrical surges, changes in current.

Is there something in the EVSE that moderates current flow and/or protects against surges?

I also wonder whether the supplied 110 cord has any surge protection as well. Does anyone plug the 110 cord into a surge protector vs. plugging directly into an outlet?
The Volt is designed to be plugged in for extended periods. I don't worry about typical line surges. Voltage surges due to lightning strikes should be avoided, always unplug your Volt from the EVSE if the local weather forecast includes lightning close to your area, i.e closer than 10 miles. That's what I always do. You could also unplug your EVSE from the outlet in the event of an electrical storm but I don't bother.
 

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I've seen surge protectors for RV plugs. But they are pricey...at least in Canada.
 

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Also, if you have a lightning strike really close by (like 10 feet from your home), the surge protector might not help as the lightning can fry anything in that vicinity. Unplugging helps prevent the direct connection from your household wiring to the car, but that doesn't prevent the lightning from potentially hitting the car and frying stuff inside.

Just pray you never have to experience this first hand. 1.21 Gigawatts @ 88 MPG could be interesting.
 

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Also, if you have a lightning strike really close by (like 10 feet from your home), the surge protector might not help as the lightning can fry anything in that vicinity. Unplugging helps prevent the direct connection from your household wiring to the car, but that doesn't prevent the lightning from potentially hitting the car and frying stuff inside.

Just pray you never have to experience this first hand. 1.21 Gigawatts @ 88 MPG could be interesting.
It is very unlikely that a vehicle would suffer a direct lightning strike as the vehicle body is like a Faraday cage, the lightning discharge would flow around the vehicle to ground. It is more likely that lightning would hit a nearby tree and the tree could fall on the Volt or the home or both would be damaged by hail during a storm but not lightning. Unplugging the Volt before an electrical storm is the best prevention for damage from an electrical surge caused by lightning.
 

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The two green disks at the top-right on this board are MOVs (metal oxide varistors). They're there for line transients. A lightning strike surge will smoke these and the fuses.

 

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The two green disks at the top-right on this board are MOVs (metal oxide varistors). They're there for line transients. A lightning strike surge will smoke these and the fuses.

I had this happen to a power strip during an electrical storm, the MOV inside the power strip literally popped. The electrical surge went through the power strip into a laser printer. My work laptop was unplugged from the power adapter but plugged into the printer via a old parallel port connection. The printer was fine afterwards but the laptop motherboard was damaged. The power strip was done and when I opened the power strip it was crispy inside.
 

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I had this happen to a power strip during an electrical storm, the MOV inside the power strip literally popped. The electrical surge went through the power strip into a laser printer. My work laptop was unplugged from the power adapter but plugged into the printer via a old parallel port connection. The printer was fine afterwards but the laptop motherboard was damaged. The power strip was done and when I opened the power strip it was crispy inside.
Surge suppressor power strips cause a number of house fires. Get rid of all of your old surge protector strips. Newer/better quality strips should include a thermal fuse in series with the varistor to prevent a possible fire hazard. Or just skip the surge suppressors and there will be no varistors.
 

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Surge suppressor power strips cause a number of house fires. Get rid of all of your old surge protector strips. Newer/better quality strips should include a thermal fuse in series with the varistor to prevent a possible fire hazard. Or just skip the surge suppressors and there will be no varistors.
I've thrown out or given away the cheap surge protectors, but have a bunch of more expensive Tripplite ISOBARs. I don't know if this was money well spent or a waste, but I bought the sales pitch - hook, line, and sinker.
 

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Does anyone plug the 110 cord into a surge protector vs. plugging directly into an outlet?
Not recommended. The surge protector must be rated at 20amps so that you could plug a continuous draw device like an EVSE into it. Most surge protectors (and I should put that in quotes) are 15 amps max.

I'm more worried about a $1700 fridge, a $1500 tv, a $2500 commercial freezer and a $43k car than a $300 EVSE. Fortunately, even living in tornado alley, we don't get a lot of lightening strikes or other surges.
 

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Not recommended. The surge protector must be rated at 20amps so that you could plug a continuous draw device like an EVSE into it. Most surge protectors (and I should put that in quotes) are 15 amps max.

I'm more worried about a $1700 fridge, a $1500 tv, a $2500 commercial freezer and a $43k car than a $300 EVSE. Fortunately, even living in tornado alley, we don't get a lot of lightening strikes or other surges.
It is not recommended to add a surge protector to GE refrigerators and freezers. The compressor is sensitive to temperature and current overloads and will shut itself down with a surge. It will also restart itself. A surge protector will override this system, and if there is a power surge, your refrigerator will not restart.
http://products.geappliances.com/appliance/gea-support-search-content?contentId=16877

I'm more inclined toward a UPS for my sensitive electronics. I haven't added one to my TV, but I have a whole house surge suppressor installed next to my service box.
 

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I've thrown out or given away the cheap surge protectors,
LOL - here, have a fire starter for your house?

but have a bunch of more expensive Tripplite ISOBARs. I don't know if this was money well spent or a waste, but I bought the sales pitch - hook, line, and sinker.
I was looking at Zero Surge but didn't bite. Damned things are very expensive.
 

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Here on the West Coast I haven't seen a lot of surges and dont worry too much. In the Midwest, Chicago ComEd, wow was it bad, got a lot during thunder/electrical storms.

Only Midwest damage I had was to a really mid-tier Fridge, Kitchenaid. After a storm I walked by and smelled smoke - noticed fridge compressor wouldn't come on. Remembered Kitchenaid had a 10 year warranty on the compressor (Parts only) but decided to take a look at what happened. When I took the covers off I quickly realized Kitchenaid (Whirlpool) had protected the compressor by using isolation in the form of a 120 to 120 relay. The relay was charred and blown to pieces. I think I got a new relay for about $25 and wasn't worth calling service for as warranty would only cover parts, $25 relay and $200 for service - not a good deal.

That said I was a little worried about the Volt's charger due to the 2012 recall on chargers. I often check to see if the charger gets hot, but I have had no problems to date.
 

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All electronics have some degree of surge and transient protection. Some better than others.
I use numerous small transient plug in devices on outlets.
Also have two of these whole house suppressors. One on my main entry panel, one on my subpanel in garage.

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Square-D...Takes-2-Load-Center-Spaces-QO2175SB/100202111

I did have an incident in Houston some years back where, apparently, a nearby lightning strike induced a transient on my old phone line cables (which were Not plugged into anything outside of the house, I was running VOIP phones). It blew apart multiple components in the VOIP box, and got through the CAT5 to the first Ethernet switch too.
 

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From what I've seen, most EVSE's have some form of current protection, usually just fuses. They are not able to regulate current or voltage. That's what the charger does. (The AC-DC inverter in the car itself)

I haven't heard of EVSE's or EV's being damaged by surges, though it would be wise to unplug the car before a lightning storm. Whole house surge protection is also a good investment. Most of the units cost around $80 and wire directly into a two pole breaker on your load center.
 
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