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I think California tried to make 10% of new cars ev by 2000. They repealed that when it was obvious that it wasn't possible. Hard to legislate changes if people don't like it.
Ev's will continue to grow in market share. IMHO there are a few hurdles that need to passed before it becomes normal to have an ev vs an ice. I have two ev and one ice, the ice isn't in danger of getting replaced with an ev any time soon.
They're managing almost 3% this year so far. And that's before the M3 registrations start.
 

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Car noob, but I understand a higher octane combusts at a higher energy and thus endures higher compression ratios (more power), correct? This is why high-performance engines need them. So, say my Volt suffers from afterfire on 87 (10% ethanol) gas. If I ran 89 or even 91, afterfire should be less likely, correct? I'm assuming the afterfire means unburnt fuel is making it to the exhaust and when it meets a hot element it produces the afterfire BANG effect. If 89+ fuel was used, would this be more difficult to ignite along the exhaust route, especially with lower pressure?
Nope, it's PURELY how resistant the stuff is to spontaneous combustion when squeezed during the compression stroke. That's exactly what you WANT it to do in a diesel, but for a normal engine, you need the thing to burn exactly when the spark lights, and not before. Higher compression engines don't get the oomph from the different fuel, they get it from the longer power stroke, and the higher octane is important to make sure that burn doesn't happen before it should. Like on the upstroke.
 
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