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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 2013 Volt.
Recently bought this GE charger (model EVDSWGH-CP01):

http://amzn.to/1KZrGQc

It is rated at 40 amps maximum. As you know the Volt will only accept 16 amps. The charger is on a 20 amp circuit.
There is a jumper inside that allows you to change the maximum amps on this charger to 15, 20, 30 or 40 amps.
While using it at 40 amps with a Volt is not dangerous it is not ideal either. So I jumpered it to 20 amps. The Volt will not charge. Interestingly enough the Volt will charge with the jumper in 15, 30 and 40 amps.
Before I return it does anyone think it might be my car?
Thanks
 

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A 60 watt bulb consumes .5 amps even though it's on a 15 amp circuit, so the setting in the EVSE will make no difference, since the Volt will only charge at 3.3 amps, regardless. If it works at any setting, then will work for the Volt. It's up to you whether you care if it works on all settings.
 

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I have a 2013 Volt.
Recently bought this GE charger (model EVDSWGH-CP01):

http://amzn.to/1KZrGQc

It is rated at 40 amps maximum. As you know the Volt will only accept 16 amps. The charger is on a 20 amp circuit.
There is a jumper inside that allows you to change the maximum amps on this charger to 15, 20, 30 or 40 amps.
While using it at 40 amps with a Volt is not dangerous it is not ideal either. So I jumpered it to 20 amps. The Volt will not charge. Interestingly enough the Volt will charge with the jumper in 15, 30 and 40 amps.
Before I return it does anyone think it might be my car?
Thanks
It's far more likely to be the EVSE, since that's the thing that changes behavior when something changes on it. What to do about it depends on how much it bothers you. The Volt can only use the 15 amps anyway. But the EVSE is probably defective and you may someday own a car with a bigger charger, so replacing EVSE while it's still under warranty might not be a bad idea.
 

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A 60 watt bulb consumes .5 amps even though it's on a 15 amp circuit, so the setting in the EVSE will make no difference, since the Volt will only charge at 3.3 amps, regardless. If it works at any setting, then will work for the Volt. It's up to you whether you care if it works on all settings.
The volt charges at 14 to 15A on 240V, not 3.3A. It is 3.3 to 3.6kW (240V x Current in amps).

Edit: max rated for his circuit is 20A (which supports a continuous current of no more than 16A), so the EVSE needs to be configured to not exceed that. It seems like there is a design issue in the EVSE or maybe just a faulty part that doesn't allow it.

The OP might want to return it and look at one of these instead (I have no affiliation):
http://www.clippercreek.com/store/product-category/featured-products/
I don't know that you can configure them lower than rated current or not, but can always buy the -20 model which is for 20 amp wiring. I like that it has a longer 25' cord.

Eric
 

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It's far more likely to be the EVSE, since that's the thing that changes behavior when something changes on it. What to do about it depends on how much it bothers you. The Volt can only use the 15 amps anyway. But the EVSE is probably defective and you may someday own a car with a bigger charger, so replacing EVSE while it's still under warranty might not be a bad idea.
Since the EVSE advertises the current capability and the on-board charger determines how much current it will allow, I don't understand why anyone would want to reduce the EVSE advertised current capability. Anything over the maximum that the on-board charger will allow means nothing to the car and doesn't adversely affect the reliability of the EVSE, IMO. Does the car not charging when the EVSE is set for the 20 amp mean that it will not be able to output 20 amps or more when the setting is 40 amps?

From what little I know about the signalling, perhaps it is possible that the EVSE signal is slightly out of range of what the on-board charger is capable of recognizing and that is the problem here, not that the EVSE is not capable of outputting the 20 amps.
 

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I'd return it if possible, then get a Clipper Creek. That's just my bias from 40 years of dealing with the General in power generation. Usually way overpriced and very difficult to deal with.
 

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I have the same EVSE. It works great for my volt, but I did not monkey around with any of the jumpers inside.

The only complaint I have is that I can never get it to 'click' onto the charge port of my volt. I do not have this problem with other chargers out in the wild. It charges my volt perfectly fine though in about 3.5 hours.

The additional features of others did not justify the cost difference for me. I got the last one Amazon had in stock for prime shipping, on sale, and cashed in my Discover rewards, 2 days and $150 later I was installing it.
 

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It must've come with a manual that would have some troubleshooting instructions. Did you try any of those?

For the jumper amperage settings... as pointed out, a Gen 1 charging at 240V will top out below 14A -- possibly higher if the voltage is lower. But even still, if it's going on a 20A circuit, it would violate code to have the jumper at 20A. The "correct" setting would be 15A. (While unlikely, it's possible that some time in the future a different EV would plug into it that is capable of higher current draw.)
 

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I have a 2013 Volt.
Recently bought this GE charger (model EVDSWGH-CP01):

http://amzn.to/1KZrGQc

It is rated at 40 amps maximum. As you know the Volt will only accept 16 amps. The charger is on a 20 amp circuit.
There is a jumper inside that allows you to change the maximum amps on this charger to 15, 20, 30 or 40 amps.
While using it at 40 amps with a Volt is not dangerous it is not ideal either. So I jumpered it to 20 amps. The Volt will not charge. Interestingly enough the Volt will charge with the jumper in 15, 30 and 40 amps.
Before I return it does anyone think it might be my car?
Thanks
You should look at the install instructions of the EVSE. Likely the instructions tell you to have a 40A breaker. You would have to determine if your wiring is setup for that.

Not sure why it is not ideal though. You will never draw more than 16A on the circuit with the Volt and probably only around 14A continuous most of the time. If it ever went above 20A there would be a problem and the breaker would trip. So if it works at 40A setting, leave it alone. If you must, set it to 15A. The Volt will likely never need to exceed that. You will not notice any difference in charge times if you do anyway.
 

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I'd call the manufacturer and see what's up. Or, just use it at a setting that works. Depends on how much time I got to deal with phone calls.

Since it should limit charging (J1772 spec) to what the car asks for, I'd opt for just using it as is. It won't be 'dangerous' that I can see. Even though it is set for 40-amps it will only deliver the Volt's max input.
 

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It must've come with a manual that would have some troubleshooting instructions. Did you try any of those?
The manual sent with these is very poor... almost as if they paid some intern to stand in front of the xerox machine and staple the two resulting pages together in a book form.
 

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On a 20 amp circuit, it should be set to 15a regardless. While it won't matter to your Volt, it should always be set to 80% (or less) of the circuits maximum capability. That way if some your or some friends future car with a higher power charger plugs into it, the circuit won't be overloaded.
 

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Before you think about returning it, there is another thread this week about a modified Leaf charger set to 20A that won't charge a gen 2 Volt and GM apparently admits the issue "may" be with the car. Since you have a 20A circuit, set the charger for 15A max and be done with it. It's fine. If you put the charger on a different circuit with a different car in the future, you can change the setting.
 

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Since the EVSE advertises the current capability and the on-board charger determines how much current it will allow, I don't understand why anyone would want to reduce the EVSE advertised current capability. Anything over the maximum that the on-board charger will allow means nothing to the car and doesn't adversely affect the reliability of the EVSE, IMO. Does the car not charging when the EVSE is set for the 20 amp mean that it will not be able to output 20 amps or more when the setting is 40 amps?

From what little I know about the signalling, perhaps it is possible that the EVSE signal is slightly out of range of what the on-board charger is capable of recognizing and that is the problem here, not that the EVSE is not capable of outputting the 20 amps.
You reduce the EVSE maximum to avoid melting the wiring in your walls. Sure the volt won't overload a 40A EVSE plugged into a 20A circuit, but if you plug in a Leaf or a Tesla, say goodbye to your electrical wiring. So setting it lower is necessary to be safe. When my electrician installed my EVSE, he only put in the gauge of wire to support 30A when it should have been a 40A circuit. So I backed down my EVSE to 24A to avoid overloading my 30A circuit. You never know when someone will stop by for a charge.
 

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. . . but if you plug in a Leaf or a Tesla, say goodbye to your electrical wiring.
That is . . . if the breaker fails to do its job or is over-sized. We don't know what his wiring is, what his breaker is, or whether it is hardwired or not.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Since a new EV is in our future I can't see buying the 20 amp model with no upgrade possibility.
And this does have a 3 year warranty.
They are shipping me a replacement.
 

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You reduce the EVSE maximum to avoid melting the wiring in your walls. Sure the volt won't overload a 40A EVSE plugged into a 20A circuit, but if you plug in a Leaf or a Tesla, say goodbye to your electrical wiring. So setting it lower is necessary to be safe. When my electrician installed my EVSE, he only put in the gauge of wire to support 30A when it should have been a 40A circuit. So I backed down my EVSE to 24A to avoid overloading my 30A circuit. You never know when someone will stop by for a charge.

I agree completely with the safety issue you point out. My thought was that there might not be something wrong with the EVSE but that there was a timing issue with the EVSE advertising its current limit and the Volt recognizing that advertisement. Edk-austin posted what I was thinking about. I think that is the issue with the OP's problem.
 
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