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There is no such thing as 110v or 220v service anywhere in the world. When you talk appliances (such as chargers), please don't call them 110v or 220v. Those are 120v or 240v. Sure, you could see a few volts less than 120 or 240 at the outlets depending on the wiring and demand, but your service, outlets, and appliances are designed for 120v or 240v. If you see 110v or 220v at an outlet, you have a problem!

Mike
 

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Really bothers you doesn't it Mike. ;) It's been used for years and although it might not be technically correct, everyone knows what someone means when they say they have 110 volt plugs in their house.

Maybe if someone measures 115 volts with a VOM on a 120 volt outlet they feel cheated but 115 volts on a 110 outlet feels great, like you are getting more than you should? :cool:
 

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From Wikepedia

In the United States and Canada, national standards specify that the nominal voltage at the source should be 120 V and allow a range of 114 V to 126 V (RMS) (−5% to +5%). Historically 110 V, 115 V and 117 V have been used at different times and places in North America.
 

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There is no such thing as 110v or 220v service anywhere in the world. When you talk appliances (such as chargers), please don't call them 110v or 220v. Those are 120v or 240v. Sure, you could see a few volts less than 120 or 240 at the outlets depending on the wiring and demand, but your service, outlets, and appliances are designed for 120v or 240v. If you see 110v or 220v at an outlet, you have a problem!

Mike
Most of Europe (and Africa, Asia, Australia, NZ etc.) uses 230V 50Hz as mains voltage. Usually within +-6% of it but +-10% can be allowed. American 240V appears to be a split-phase system, in comparison our (Finnish) residential supply is 3-phase 400V which gives 230V between any phase and neutral.

Europe used to have 220V and 240V systems, later those were standardized to 230V. Some areas of UK still have 250V but they fall in the +-10% 230V spec anyway...
 

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Agreed, but at least it's close... my pet peeve is the large frequency of using kilowatts when you mean kilowatt-hours (and vice versa). Confusing power and energy in an enthusiast car forum... that's basically like confusing horsepower and gallons, they're totally different things!
 

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and then you get into 3 phase power and its 120/208 volts so the 220 volt covers everything
so you know it will work on 240 as well as 208v
the 110 volt tells you that you can have a little more line loss (reduced voltage over longer building distances in wire resistance) and it will still function ok
 

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Agreed, but at least it's close... my pet peeve is the large frequency of using kilowatts when you mean kilowatt-hours (and vice versa). Confusing power and energy in an enthusiast car forum... that's basically like confusing horsepower and gallons, they're totally different things!
No reason to obsess over that either, it's always clear from context.
 

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No reason to obsess over that either, it's always clear from context.
Yeah, lots of examples of that like, "I'm having troubles with my breaks, they chatter when I push the pedal."
 

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No reason to obsess over that either, it's always clear from context.
To me, it's about people not caring to learn a pretty basic thing about EVs, on a fan site. If you were on an ICE enthusiast forum and half the regulars frequently said things like "I only used 50hp on my 100 mile commute this morning!" it would get old fast, too.

But hey, I'm an engineer, so I care about stuff like this. I bet I write things (in passive voice!) that annoy the English majors out there... (but this isn't a writing forum)
 

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Yeah, lots of examples of that like, "I'm having troubles with my breaks, they chatter when I push the pedal."
. . . . or, I just mounted a new car charger on the wall of my garage - What do you think??

Don
 

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Another one that bugs me to no end is . . . . "I just bought some rims"

A rim is that portion of a wheel that the tire is mounted to - Usually, you buy a wheel . . . . but there are a few instances where the wheel center and the rim are two different pieces, bolted together, so I guess if you had a wheel you really liked, but you dinged up the rim, maybe you could just buy the rims and have them bolted onto your old wheels??

Naaaw - That doesn't happen. Nobody buys 'rims' . . . . they buy wheels

Don
 

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Too much OCD in this post. :p
 

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Oh NO, I have 121 volts on my 209 Volt 3 phase system. YIKES!! If one lives in the country, voltage can get up to 130 V or as low as 100 volts depending on the utility company and how well the transformers are regulated and how they manage the load. Only if one is anal does it really matter - unless of course your light bulbs and other items burn out prematurely because your 110 volt bulbs are drawing too many watts. As for kilowatts, that is 1000 watts. As for Kilowatt Hours, that is = to 1000 watts in an hour. You are talking equivalency, regardless.
 

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English is not Verilog, in English you don't have to be exactly correct because humans are intelligent, computers aren't. People understand context and are capable of inferring what someone says even if what they say isn't technically correct. It's fine to say charger instead of EVSE, everyone knows what you mean, it also makes more sense if you look at things as a black box. An EVSE looks like a scaled up phone charger, the fact that it passes AC through to the car and that the AC to DC conversion takes place within the car vs doing the conversion itself and passing DC is invisible to an observer, and completely irrelevant since the end result is the same, i.e. energy from the wall is converted into stored energy in the battery. If you say 60KW battery vs 60KWh battery nobody will misunderstand you, the energy stored in batteries is measured in kilowatt hours so in this context KW is merely shorthand for KWh, btw you would be technically correct if you stated the energy capacity of a battery in BTUs instead of KWhs but that would be confusing because nobody uses BTUs when describing electrical energy although it's common when describing the energy stored in a gallon of gasoline or a cubic foot of natural gas As for rims vs wheels, car wheels are commonly called rims, always have been, if you say rims people will always know that you are talking about the metal portion of the wheels.
 

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I work with an old-timer that still insists on referring to hertz as cycles:rolleyes:

To each his own I suppose!;)
 

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This is a blast and proof that too many of us have too much time on our hands. :p
 

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Discussion Starter #19
This is a blast and proof that too many of us have too much time on our hands. :p
True. It's all the time I save from not having to stop at gas stations: don't know what to do with that time. ;) Plus it's clear after posting this that I might be due for a name change. Thinking of changing my name to: A. Gnall. :D

Mike
 

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For some odd reason, this thread made me think of something I once heard Click and Clack say ....

Whenever a Boston native says "caaaa", that missing "r" instantly migrates to Texas where someone says "time to change my oirl". This proves that consonants, like energy, are never really used up, only converted to another form.
 
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