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So, I had my window smashed and my 120V wall plug charger stolen. I have automotive(comprehensive) and renter's insurance.

Both insurers are telling me the ($525) charger is the other's responsibility. Renter's (in my opinion I agree) say that it's a car part, it's a necessary part of the car's functioning, it was removed as part of the larger vandalism, it's an automotive insurance issue.

Automotive is telling me that since it's a loose part, it counts as 'personal property in the car' and therefore is renter's.

Can anyone advise? Who should I be going after to pay for this?
 
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So, I had my window smashed and my 120V wall plug charger stolen. I have automotive(comprehensive) and renter's insurance.

Both insurers are telling me the ($525) charger is the other's responsibility. Renter's (in my opinion I agree) say that it's a car part, it's a necessary part of the car's functioning, it was removed as part of the larger vandalism, it's an automotive insurance issue.

Automotive is telling me that since it's a loose part, it counts as 'personal property in the car' and therefore is renter's.

Can anyone advise? Who should I be going after to pay for this?
I'm no expert when it comes to insurance but I believe the automotive insurance is correct. Basically if it's not attached to the vehicle it's a personal item and thus covered under renters. Here's an analogy which may be helpful:

If your vehicle is totaled you are permitted to remove any personal items from within. My insurance company defines personal items as essentially anything that is not physically attached to the vehicle. Thus an aftermarket stereo would be considered part of the vehicle whereas the a dash camera would not.

Of course this all depends on your insurance carrier. I assume you do not have the same carrier for both?
 

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I'm no expert when it comes to insurance but I believe the automotive insurance is correct. Basically if it's not attached to the vehicle it's a personal item and thus covered under renters. Here's an analogy which may be helpful:

If your vehicle is totaled you are permitted to remove any personal items from within. My insurance company defines personal items as essentially anything that is not physically attached to the vehicle. Thus an aftermarket stereo would be considered part of the vehicle whereas the a dash camera would not.

Of course this all depends on your insurance carrier. I assume you do not have the same carrier for both?
You could argue that the OE EVSE is Volt factory equipment, not an after market accessory. It came with the vehicle when you purchased the Volt. Ask the auto insurance company whether a stolen key fob would be covered on the auto policy, it too came with the Volt.

If you had luggage in the Volt or a laptop that was stolen then those items would be covered under renter's insurance. OTOH, if the EVSE had been stolen from your home or garage, you would no doubt claim the loss on your renter's insurance.

Which policy has the lower deductible limit?
 

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Option three, log on to Amazon, order new EVSE, stop worrying about insurance. Save it for big stuff like when someone runs a red light.
 

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Seems to me it would count just like the air pump or spare tire - how ever that is done as i don't know ?

If a home insurance - mine has a limit on away from home items taken and IRS claims for loss never help on low cost loss.

but with the glass and charger cord I guess you many be near the break even on a claim.
 

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What's your deductible? You're probably paying most of the cost anyway, plus higher future premiums if you file a claim.
 

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Don't know where you live but in my state there is a State Insurance Commission that oversees insurance disputes. My suggestion is ask your insurance where you can take a dispute, then file a complaint against both insurance companies.
 

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What's your deductible? You're probably paying most of the cost anyway, plus higher future premiums if you file a claim.
Volterado is right, chances are your deductible is more than the cost of a new EVSE so there is no reason to file a claim. Your renters insurance won't cover it because it wasn't taken from your house unless you bought a specific rider to cover it and I can't imagine that you did. I would have thought that the EVSE would be considered part of the car because it's a component that came with the car, but unless you have a $0 deductible, and nobody does, it really doesn't matter. A new portable ClipperCreek is $395.
 

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Not sure about the "advisability" of filing the claim. You can figure that part yourself based on the total claim and your policies.

As for the EVSE, assuming it is the OEM EVSE, then it should be covered under car insurance because: it came with the car and is essential in operating the car. Also, it is not a "loose part" because it has a storage compartment under the trunk floor. It is exactly like a spare tire. If someone stole your spare tire, would they say it is a 'loose part" and not covered? Ask the insurance agent that.
It is understandable that they would not know this because, realistically, most people know almost nothing about EV technology and are unfamiliar with EVSE's, etc.. However, if they don't accept this explanation, then I would switch insurance companies.

One other reason it is considered part of the car is that if you sold the car, you would have to include this item since it is essential. No EV knowledgeable buyer would accept the car without this part, or at least an adjustment to the sales price to cover replacing it. In this way, it would be kind of like listing a minivan for sale, but failing to mention that the 2nd and 3rd row seats have been removed and are not included. That would not fly either. The seating is an essential part of the minivan for the typical buyer.
 
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I'm surprised the OP has different insurance companies for the car and renters insurance. Typically people use the same insurance company as they receive discounts when combining different types of policies. My condo, vehicle, umbrella, and major appliance insurance is all with the same company for that reason (and no finger pointing).
 

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I can buy a replacement EVSE for the Volt for less than my deductible on either my car or homeowners insurance. I wouldn't even file a claim. I would file a police report.

The other question is which carrier is paying for the broken car window? That should be who's paying for the EVSE as well since the car was physically damaged.
 

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Sue yourself and John Doe for the cost of a new one and send them both a notice to defend you from yourself. It'll be fun.
 

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Ebay is your friend. You can pick up perfectly good used OEM units for $200 or less. I bought a spare OEM (Clipper Creek version) last fall with the intent of converting it to 240v.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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I can buy a replacement EVSE for the Volt for less than my deductible on either my car or homeowners insurance. I wouldn't even file a claim. I would file a police report.
I would guess part of the calculus on this issue is that if the same policy covers both losses, then the deductible is exceeded and it may make sense to file the claim. If the insurance companies can succeed at splitting up the losses between the two policies, then they avoid paying anything because both deductibles would then have to be met.
 

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I would guess part of the calculus on this issue is that if the same policy covers both losses, then the deductible is exceeded and it may make sense to file the claim. If the insurance companies can succeed at splitting up the losses between the two policies, then they avoid paying anything because both deductibles would then have to be met.
I think you hit the nail on the head - since OP's car was physically broken into (broken window) anything stolen from inside the car should apply against OP's auto policy. Had OP's car been unlocked and the thief simply opened the door then this would be renter's policy.
 
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